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Thread: What breed my dog is? Pllease help me find out.

  1. #11

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    I'd bet $50 that those mottled stripes and the skinny body means she's got greyhound in her. Those ears, solid build, and facial structure look like ridgeback, but could possibly even be weimaraner.

  2. #12

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    have you got her dna tested its not as good but i will give you basic breed in her
    If you are reading this then you're doing just fine as to
    I'm not going to tell ya I lost the ' , . ? ! " Keys to my head
    No grammar no problem I don't know how to fly it any way Bye

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    South West WA
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    Maybe it's just me but I see Vizlsa in the mix

  4. #14
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    Jul 2011
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    se qld
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    Lovely girl, I agree with the others regarding the gun dog look, especially her ears and long legs.
    Does she love tracking and staring at birds?

  5. #15
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    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post

    And Beloz is right, even some ridgeback puppies are born without ridges. That's usually considered a breed fault and these days those puppies get desexed before they're rehomed.
    Just on this note;

    (BTW- **** within text is h o m o )

    ''Geneticists studying the ridge have concluded that it is a simple autosomal dominant trait – that is, only one parent needs to have a ridge in order for it to be passed down to offspring.

    Ridgeless Rhodesian Ridgebacks don't carry the ridge gene at all, and cannot produce ridged offspring any more than a Chesapeake Bay retriever or Chihuahua can. Ridgeback breeders who are interested in ridge inheritance often forget that not having a ridge is the normative state in dogs. The ridge gene is a dominant mutation that makes our ridged dogs different.

    If a Ridgeback has a ridge, he is either carrying two copies of the ridge gene (****zygous), or just one copy (heterozygous). Either way, the dog will have a ridge -- you can't tell if he has one or two copies from just looking at him. You might be able to figure out his genotype (that is, whether he is heterozygous or ****zygous) retrospectively based on breeding history.*

    It is the breeding of heterozygous Ridgebacks that produces ridgelessness.*

    When two heterozygous dogs are bred together, each puppy has a 25 percent chance of being ridgeless; a 50 percent chance of being ridged and heterozygous (only having one copy of the ridge gene) and a 25 percent chance of being ridged and ****zygous (having two copies of the ridge gene, and so never producing ridgeless no matter who they are bred to).

    ****zygous dogs -- those with two copies of the gene -- will never produce ridgeless. That's because, when it comes time for ****zgyous Ridgebacks to donate one of their two genes to offspring, all they have to pass on is a ridge gene. And because the ridge gene is dominant, no matter what the other parent contributes, the offspring will have a ridge.

    When a ****zygous Ridgeback is bred to a heterozygous Ridgeback, all the puppies will have ridges, but genetically they can be different. Each puppy has a 50 percent chance of being ****zygous (having two copies of the gene, and never producing ridgeless) and a 50 percent chance of being heterozygous (having only one copy of the gene, and so potentially producing ridgeless if bred to another heterozygote).*

    Unfortunately, without a genetic marker test, we cannot tell the last two apart just by looking at their outward appearance (what scientists fancily call phenotype).

    So once a genetic marker is available, will the goal be to eliminate ridgelessness entirely from the Rhodesian Ridgeback population?

    We hope not, for several reasons.

    The Khoikhoi dogs of South Africa, from which our dogs derive the ridge trait, were not an all-ridged population. Because their breedings were not managed and directed by humans, a degree of ridgelessness in their breed population was normal. This arguably maintained an important balance in the gene pool: As we know from breeds that have tried to “fix,” or standarize, dominant mutations – such as hairlessness in Chinese crested dogs and taillessness in Manx cats – ****zygosity can lead to unwanted results. (In both those cases, ****zygous offspring are born dead.)*

    Ridgeback breeders and researchers have long known that there is a relationship between the presence of the ridge (or some element of it) and dermoid sinus, a congenital defect that is found in the world’s two ridged breeds -- Rhodesian and Thai ridgebacks. While we do not fully understand this correlation, some have posited that increased ridge ****zygosity could have an impact on the prevalence of dermoids. While this is just educated conjecture, it does remind us that moderation – in our dogs as well as our breeding practices – is often the wisest approach.

    We are not suggesting that Ridgeback breeders increase the incidence of ridgeless puppies, but rather that they take a nuanced, textured look at our breed and its genetic history, and not rush to swing the pendulum in any one direction, lest we invite unforeseen – and potentially disastrous -- results.''

    From: Rhodesian Ridgeback Health GENETICS OF THE RIDGE

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by chubbsecurity View Post
    Lovely girl, I agree with the others regarding the gun dog look, especially her ears and long legs.
    Does she love tracking and staring at birds?
    Yes she used to stare at birds and try to chase them when she was I think 7 months old but now being a 10 month old dog now she no more stares at birds and also has left being intrigued by little insects she has kinda become a serious dog she does stare at peoples specially strangers and bark at them when she sees them doing any thing unusual I mean like when someone passes by her runningly or if the bell rings.
    Last edited by dannygracia; 08-16-2012 at 03:06 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    So ridgeless ridgeback x ridged ridgeback - is actually a desirable mating health wise?

    Is it ANKC ridgeback policy to desex the ridgeless or can they be main registered (suitable for breeding - with a ridged ridge back)?

  8. #18

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    I agree with the others, Ridgeback x Great Dane with a few others in the mix too somewhere.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
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    871

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    What country or state are you in?

    In Australia tail docking is illegal - and even the roo dogs/lurchers were never docked.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I think DannyGracia might be in Pakistan or there abouts.

    I've been admiring the tiles in the photos - gorgeous patterns of blue and white that are popular in Muslim countries.

    This dog is nothing like the semi-feral ones in that area - or across Asia and Northern africa. So it must be from a home that likes to have dogs.

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