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Thread: What dog breed?

  1. #1

    Cool What puppy breed?

    We are going to get a puppy, the owner is 13, but small, and I think a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is the best way to go? (We are not sure as they have so many things that can go wrong....) She doesn't want a big dog, but not small either. It should be intelligent and fit (just not unfit...). Can you suggest any dog breeds?

  2. #2

    Cool What dog breed?

    Hi all,
    We are going to get a puppy, the owner is 13, but small, and I think a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is the best way to go? (We are not sure as they have so many things that can go wrong....) She doesn't want a big dog, but not small either. It should be intelligent and fit (just not unfit...). Can you suggest any dog breeds?

  3. #3

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    Please consider saving a dog. Look at petrescue: petrescue.com.au
    Many of the dogs are fostered so they tell you about the dog's personality. They also have 2 weeks trial period in case it doesn't work out and for your peace of mind.
    So many dogs there that could make your daughter happy. It also teaches her compassion and so many other life lessons.
    I have a tiny 9 year old boy (he really is so small for his age) and we adopted a dog out of the pound. Best thing we have ever done.
    My boy tells anyone who would listen that he saved his dog and how he is taking care of him now because life has been unkind to him.
    I can't help you with breed as our dog is a cross of many breeds but his personality is just perfect for us.
    Edited to add - they have many puppies there as well as young dogs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Cavalier King Charles Spaniels make great family pets. I would be hesitant to let a 13 year old be completely responsible for a dog though... if that is what you mean.

    When choosing a breed you need to look at exercise requirements - how much are you willing to do, grooming needs, how long the dog will spend alone each week - as far as I am aware Cav's don' like to spend a lot of time alone, size of dog, will the dog be inside or outside and how easily will the dog fit into your current lifestyle. I am sure there are more things you need to look at as well.... but they slip my mind now post personal training session haze!

    I've also merged both of your threads into one... there is no need for two
    Last edited by jadielee87; 07-23-2012 at 07:25 PM.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    The main thing is to make sure you get your new pet from a responsible breeder. RSPCA sets out some good criteria and their knowledge base has loads of information on what a new puppy would need from you.

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    How do I find a good dog breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    I cannot recommend strongly enough to avoid puppies from petshops. Stay away from petshops that sell kittens and puppies. They only care about profit, not you or the baby animal.

    and this website is great for info on how to choose a puppy and how to manage it when you get it home.
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are very forgiving. If you can get one from a responsible breeder that has done all the health checking (and can show you written documentation of it), and that involves xrays and dna tests... not just a vet check.
    LIDA Dogs - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    I would also consider Papillon - very cute, super intelligent and energetic...
    Pommeranian - though their coat does need some more care - eg crutching. A little bit more laid back than the papillion..

    I also like terriers like the border terrier - they're in quite a few movies and tv ads. And cairn terriers. Though if mishandled - by teenage children - terriers can get snappy. I grew up with an Aussie Terror - she gave as good as she got - but we never told because we knew it would be curtains for her and it was usually all our fault. Most of them are very sturdy dogs. And if you get a border terrier you will never have a rodent problem in the house. (Don't get if you keep pet mice).

    And given a dog can live 15 or so years, get a dog you - the parents - love because if your daughter grows up and moves out - she may not be able to take the dog with her to rental accommodation.

  6. #6

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    Go to animal planet website answer 10 quick questions about what breed to get or something
    anyway it is good basis
    m<(o.o)>m

  7. #7

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    I recommend saving a mongrel from your local shelter. Mixed breeds are genetically stronger, they live longer, they have less inherited conditions, and they are much cheaper to insure. Don't make the mistake of automatically associating pure breeding with quality, that isn't how genetics work. The more genetic diversity in the dog's bloodline, the less likely it is to suffer from defects like hip displasia, brachycephaly, or eye popping, and it will cost you a lot less on vet bills in the long run and be cheaper to buy initially. Many people shell out thousands of dollars on a new purebred puppy only to discover it will have a lifetime of health problems.

    Dog shelters have litters of puppies all the time, choose a cute little mongrel that you like, and make sure you pick the quiet, calm puppy.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosh View Post
    I recommend saving a mongrel from your local shelter. Mixed breeds are genetically stronger, they live longer, they have less inherited conditions, and they are much cheaper to insure. Don't make the mistake of automatically associating pure breeding with quality, that isn't how genetics work. The more genetic diversity in the dog's bloodline, the less likely it is to suffer from defects like hip displasia, brachycephaly, or eye popping, and it will cost you a lot less on vet bills in the long run and be cheaper to buy initially. Many people shell out thousands of dollars on a new purebred puppy only to discover it will have a lifetime of health problems.

    Dog shelters have litters of puppies all the time, choose a cute little mongrel that you like, and make sure you pick the quiet, calm puppy.
    do have some figures to back up your claims here please? I would be very interested to read it

    I do think the above is a generalisation - there is good and bad in both purebreds and mongrels. If you research your breeder and they do all the health checks needed to ensure they are breeding healthy dogs, they socialise them and also look at what support you would receive from the breeder - if your circumstances change, will they help you rehome your dog or help find other solutions? this is what you need to look for in a breeder

    Going to a rescue that uses foster care would also give you a better idea of how the dog is in a home situation, so you could also talk to some rescues and ask for help in finding the right dog for your family

  9. #9

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    do have some figures to back up your claims here please? I would be very interested to read it
    Sure do. Genetic diversity trumps purebreeding every time - the reason is because when you bottleneck a population's genetic material, the defects are recycled along with the attributes. Since the defects are most often recessive, both parents must have the recessive gene in order for the characteristic to be displayed in the phenotype. The smaller the gene pool, the more likely both parents will have a recessive condition. The larger the gene pool, the more likely only one or neither of the parents will have the recessive condition. Genetic defects don't tend to be dominant because dominant defects are easily identifiable and thus easily weeded out from a population through natural or artificial selection.

    In nature, the most adaptable and successful animal is always the one with the largest population and most diverse genetic background. This makes them more resistant to diseases, poisons, and environmental hazards/challenges. Genetic diversity (and the benefits it brings) is one of the reasons organisms evolved from using self-replicating asexual reproduction (echinoderms and annelids) to sexual reproduction (mammals and birds) where the genes from both parents are combined to create a new genotype.

    Humans have got it into their heads somewhere in history that a pure bloodline with a limited genetic background makes a stronger animal, but this is usually always false. You can breed certain characteristics (appearance, temperment, etc) into an animal, but you will always be breeding unwanted characteristics into it as well, it is unavoidable. Even the most responsible breeder will unintentionally be breeding weakness as well, this is because one of the prime factors that they are breeding is the apperance of the dog. They will claim that you can purebreed without unwanted genetic conditions, but this is totally false because unless you DNA test every dog, the recessive genes cannot be spotted until they display themselves in an offspring. Most purebreeds will also have a much higher mortality and deformation rate in newborn puppies than mongrels and crossbreeds. People want a dog that can be easily identifiable as a particular breed with particular attributes, but this is very bad for the species as a whole. The healthiest, fittest, most adaptable animals are always the ones with the most diversity in their bloodline.

    It's important to note that this would not happen without such a fixation on appearance - if people bred dogs purely on the basis of their temperament, abilities, and intelligence, the genetic problems would not be anywhere near as common or pronounced because the gene pool would be a lot larger. Of course this would mean that each breed would not have a standard of appearance, and every dog would look unique. The problem here is that people want the breeds to be easily identifiable because it's a quick way of knowing what role or job a dog is good for.

    With a pedigree as long as his tail, you might expect the pure-bred pooch to trounce his mongrel cousin in an IQ test.
    But it seems that all that breeding may be for nothing. For when it comes to intelligence, scientists say the crossbreed wins, paws down.
    Researchers who tested dozens of dogs found that mongrels have superior spatial awareness and are better at solving problems.
    Their abilities mean they would be well-suited to working for the police, for the blind, and as sheepdogs.
    And those tempted to spend hundreds on a pedigree pup should take note. It could be that these skills also make crossbreeds better pets.
    The Aberdeen University researchers put the dogs through a series of tests designed to rate their abilities out of 30.
    In one test, a bone was covered with a tin to assess whether the dogs were intelligent enough to realise it still existed.
    In another, they had to find their way through a maze.
    Top dog was a collie-spaniel cross called Jet, which scored full marks.
    Joint second came a labrador-collie cross, a labrador-golden retriever cross, a Jack Russell-cocker spaniel cross, a German shepherd-labrador cross, and a lhasa apso-poodle cross.
    The crossbreed also did better overall, with an average score of 20 - two points higher than the pedigrees.
    In fact, seven out of the top ten were crossbreeds.
    Researcher Dr David Smith said: "Being a purebred does not improve the intelligence, and our tests showed that a number of cross-bred dogs actually scored higher than pedigrees.
    He suggested that it might be wise for the police to consider training crossbreeds, rather than relying on pedigree German shepherds.
    "Crossbreeding a German shepherd with a rottweiler, for instance, would produce as good a police dog as a pure-bred German shepherd," he added.
    There is another downside to the pedigree animal. They can be susceptible to medical problems that arise from inbreeding.
    For example, German shepherds are vulnerable to hip injuries which may cut short their working lives.
    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association is already certain of mongrels' value. It breeds more 1,000 animals a year to train as guide dogs.
    Matthew Bottomley, breeding manager for the charity, said: 'We are finding that, statistically, crossbreeds make better guide dogs.
    About 45 per cent of the dogs we now produce are crossbreeds and we are planning to produce more in the coming years.
    About 80 per cent of the crossbreeds currently become guide dogs compared with 65 per cent of pure-bred dogs.
    We will always produce purebred dogs because some of our clients still want them.
    But crossing breeds definitely makes for a good mix in terms of adaptability and temperament."

    SOURCE
    The theory of hybrid vigor suggests that as a group, dogs of varied ancestry will be healthier than their purebred counterparts. In purebred dogs, intentionally breeding dogs of very similar appearance over several generations produces animals that carry many of the same alleles, some of which are detrimental. This is especially true if the dogs are closely related. This inbreeding among purebreds has exposed various genetic health problems not readily apparent in less uniform populations. Mixed-breed dogs are more genetically diverse due to the more haphazard nature of their parents' mating. "Haphazard" is not the same as "random" to a geneticist. The offspring of such matings might be less likely to express certain genetic disorders because there might be a decreased chance that both parents carry the same detrimental recessive alleles. However, some deleterious recessives occur across many seemingly unrelated breeds, and therefore merely mixing breeds is no guarantee of genetic health.

    "Hybrids have a far lower chance of exhibiting the disorders that are common with the parental breeds",[10] but crossbreeding two poor specimens together does not guarantee the resulting offspring will be healthier than the parents because the offspring could inherit the worst traits of both parents. This is commonly seen in dogs from puppy mills.[11] Healthy traits have been lost in many purebred dogs lines because many breeders of showdogs are more interested in conformation - the physical attributes of the dogs in relation to the breed standard - than in the health and working temperament for which the dog was originally bred.[citation needed]

    Purebred and mixed-breed dogs are equally susceptible to most non-genetic ailments, such as rabies, distemper, injury, and infestation by parasites.

    Several studies have shown that mixed-breed dogs have a health advantage. A German study finds that "Mongrels require less veterinary treatment".[12] Studies in Sweden have found that "Mongrel dogs are less prone to many diseases than the average purebred dog"[13] and, referring to death rates, “Mongrels were consistently in the low risk category”.[14] Data from Denmark also suggest that mixed breeds have higher longevity on average compared to purebreeds. [15] A British study showed similar results but a few breeds (notably Jack Russell Terrier, Miniature Poodles and Whippets) lived longer than mixed breeds.[16]

    In one landmark study,the effect of breed on longevity in the pet dog was analyzed using mortality data from 23,535 pet dogs. The data was obtained from North American veterinary teaching hospitals. The median age at death was determined for pure and mixed breed dogs of different body weights. Within each body weight category, the median age at death was lower for pure breed dogs compared with mixed breed dogs. The median age at death was "8.5 years for all mixed breed dogs, and 6.7 years for all pure breed dogs" in the study.[17]
    SOURCE



    Some more links on hybrid vigor and heterosis:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heterosis
    http://www.plantcell.org/content/22/7/2105.abstract
    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/articles...osiseffect.htm
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/...4358/heterosis
    Last edited by Mosh; 07-24-2012 at 08:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    Thanks Mosh - will have a bit of read over the weekend

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