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Thread: What dog breed?

  1. #11

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    I think a Cavie is a great choice for an 11 year old, others that would make a great pet growing up with an 11 year old could be a Lhasa Apso, or a * cough* it-shitzu, they would be my fit for an 11 year old looking for a first dog to grow 15+ years with.
    My personal choice wouldn't be them at 11, I was fond of Basenji dogs and jack russles and what not then.
    Beau.
    If you find yourself going through hell; Don't stay. Just keep on going.
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  2. #12

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    My personal favorite for kids is a cavalier cross pug, they are friendly, low energy, and gentle and don't need a lot of exercise.



    Any kind of whippet cross is also awesome, they require a bit of exercise but most of the time they will lounge around. They are very smart and their fur is soft and velvety.

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  3. #13
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    Jan 2012
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    When i was that age i had a maltese. We got him at four though so he was already fairly calm at that age. But i have a Maltese puppy now and she is great, and they don't malt much! And she's been pretty easy to house train, although she still occasionally has accidents but thats ok
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  4. #14
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    Mosh

    While genetic diversity is good in the wild - most dogs in Australia do not live in the wild - there's no natural selection or survival of the fittest going on. So there's no guarantee with a mutt that you won't get a bunch of genetic problems. In fact - a bunch of genetic problems are more likely with a puppy farmer that is deliberately breeding for "cute puppies" than with an ANKC registered breeder or other responsible breeder that gets genetic tests and hip scores done before deciding which dogs to mate.

    So if the puppy farmer chooses two breeds that have genetic problems in common - like PRA or hip displasia or both and does not test the breeding stock before mating them - they can easily guarantee breeding in genetic faults. I've seen pet shop puppy mill specials with joint problems, major dental problems (one friend's pet shop mutt just had 17 teeth out), eye problems (there's three blind puppy farm specials at one dog park I visit - three different owners).

    Hybrid vigor with designer mutts is a myth.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Mosh

    While genetic diversity is good in the wild - most dogs in Australia do not live in the wild - there's no natural selection or survival of the fittest going on. So there's no guarantee with a mutt that you won't get a bunch of genetic problems. In fact - a bunch of genetic problems are more likely with a puppy farmer that is deliberately breeding for "cute puppies" than with an ANKC registered breeder or other responsible breeder that gets genetic tests and hip scores done before deciding which dogs to mate.

    So if the puppy farmer chooses two breeds that have genetic problems in common - like PRA or hip displasia or both and does not test the breeding stock before mating them - they can easily guarantee breeding in genetic faults. I've seen pet shop puppy mill specials with joint problems, major dental problems (one friend's pet shop mutt just had 17 teeth out), eye problems (there's three blind puppy farm specials at one dog park I visit - three different owners).

    Hybrid vigor with designer mutts is a myth.

    Hybrid vigor only applies if the two parents have diverse genes. With a designer puppy you aren't really getting that much genetic diversity, in fact a puppy farm will inbreed their mutts even worse than a bad purebreeder. Your friend's dog could have been a second generation inbred or a fifth generation inbred, we will never know. It is highly unlikely it was a first generation cross. In breeding mutts with their own family members, puppy farmers are creating conditions that are the same as an irresponsible purebreeder. However if you took your friend's mutant mutt and bred it with another mutant mutt from a different cross from the other side of the country, most of their puppies would probably be pretty normal, even if they were carriers of whatever recessive conditions their parents had. It is less likely that two recessive conditions will match up if both parents are very genetically different. Puppy mills commonly inbreed within families, its no good mating two different breeds if you're then going to mate siblings together.

    This can mean that genetic problems will disappear in a few generations if diversity is maintained - if you bred a pure cavvie suffering from syringomyelia with a pure pug suffering from weak kneecaps, their puppies would probably be pretty healthy because the recessive conditions would not match up. The offspring may be carriers of the recessive genes for these disorders, but as long as they weren't bred with other carriers (pure cavvies or pure pugs or their offspring), the recessive disorder genes would disappear completely probably within 5 or 6 generations.

  6. #16

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    Or... You could just buy a purebred from health tested parents instead of taking a gamble.

    Until someone starts providing me with links to breeders of cross-breds who health test I will always recommend a purebred hands down (excluding shelter dogs of course, I'm talking paying hard cash for a dog, not an adoption fee).

    Though I do applaud Mosh for being the only crossbreed supporter with a brain I have come across lately, well written.

  7. #17

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    i rec pure breeds to i rased my first staffy at 14 you all know ruby allready there the best dogs for kids
    its all ways good to know someone who suports cross breed
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  8. #18
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    I have owned mostly pedigrees in my times as a doglet owner - my own advice to you is, IF you can stomach the dispair, go to your local adoption centre and have your child see what dogs they are drawn to - it's all very well and good to make a 3rd party decision that a CKC is the "right dog" - but the reality is, your child may naturally be drawn to another breed - or cross - and an adoption centre is a great place to start {personally I can't go near them as I am far too emotional - Mum's doglet was adopted, and when she went to choose, I had to sit in the car, and even then was nearly in hysterics at what I knew was behind the fences}

    Once your child has figured out what sort of dog they like, research, reasearch, research.

    AND NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER buy a dog from a pet shop. No matter what claims they make, these pups come from puppy farms... plain and simple.
    Last edited by Pinkest; 07-28-2012 at 09:10 AM.

  9. #19
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    Jan 2012
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    I agree with Pinkest, take your child see the dogs. My sister bought a pup for her son many years ago, he wanted a staffy, he was 13, she bought a border collie x lab I think, Patch is the most beautiful dog, but my nephew didn't ever see her as a boy's dog. She's 17 and still alive, he's 30 and he does love her and look after her, but he's just waiting for the day he can buy a staffy or a rottie ... he hated that his mum bought him a dog and chose it without him having a say in it.

    I was never able to go into the rescue centres, but since my two dogs died last year, some part of me became "Ice Woman" and I looked through nearly every rescue centre in Perth for my next fur-child. I realised that the people who run most of the rescues here just live for the dogs and they probably get more love in their time in rescue than they ever had in their lives before. It is good to wander around them and have a look at the adult version of what the cute puppy will grow into.

    I agree, please don't support pet shops... they should only sell products, never live animals.

  10. #20
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    Mosh

    That's not very consistent.

    There is a possiblity that your shelter mutt puppy has been rescued from a puppy farm. There's no guarantee of genetic diversity in a shelter puppy either.

    I did meet a puppy this morning that had been described as a weimerana x doberban x lab from RSPCA. It had a silver colour to it like a weim, and doberman or black and tan kelpie markings under that and a general weim shape. But looking at it from a distance - I thought it was a dachshund x cattle dog because of the shape of the ears... who knows.

    Was very friendly tho. I pick the friendly puppy. It's a bit hard to expect a normal puppy to be calm unless it's exhausted.

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