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Thread: Talon,poisonng and Maggie

  1. #1
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    Default Talon,poisonng and Maggie

    Last night while visiting Maggie ate a box of Talon. Fortunately we realised as soon as we got home and took her to the vet. Several vomits, activated charcoal, vomit and Vitamin K we are home. This morning she is showing no signs of last nights miseries.
    Does anyone have any thoughts on the best ways to care for her as her stomach hopefully recovers. Are there foods we could look at?
    We have to keep her quiet ( well as low key as we can) and continue the vitamin K of course.

    Thanks by the way for the chat about pet insurance. I did get some. We used a years worth last night,

  2. #2

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    Feed her boiled chicken and rice with the broth. Cut the chicken up fine. After a few days you can soak some kibble in the broth to soften it .

    I don't think Talon has warfaren in it like Ratsak does. Thats bad sh*t. Friends dog ate a couple sachets and they did all the right things but it still had to be PTS.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  3. #3
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    Thank dog you realised quickly and she's on the road to recovery. There is no sader sight than a poisoned dog.
    Is she wanting to eat ?

    When Scooby had parvo he wouldnt eat and of course his insides where taking a hammering. The only thing he would eat was Pilchards or tinned tuna. Thats what the vet recommended we try and hegobbled it down.

    Hope she's allright.


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  4. #4
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    She is eating very well. She had eaten it within the previous 2 hours. The next 3 or 4 days will tell the tale.
    Not something I even thought of as she has been there many times. They put it in what they thought was an unreachable place and hadn't had a puppy for years.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nev Allen View Post
    Feed her boiled chicken and rice with the broth. Cut the chicken up fine. After a few days you can soak some kibble in the broth to soften it .

    I don't think Talon has warfaren in it like Ratsak does. Thats bad sh*t. Friends dog ate a couple sachets and they did all the right things but it still had to be PTS.
    From what I have read Talon is worse than Ratsak at least when it comes to eating the poisoned mice. It is probably dose and size dependent and how quickly one can react as to the outcome. My dog got into some ratsak a couple of years ago, fortunately with not too many consequences. Glad she is on the road to recovery.

  6. #6
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    Oh, this brings back memories.

    About 23 years ago, my beagle of the time, Daisy, got into a box of Ratsak whilst I was living at Mum and Dad's. And, being a beagle, inhaled about 80% of the box. I was asleep at the time (this was about 7am). About 830 when I got up, Mum casually says to me that she'd been in it, but she didn't think anything was wrong... WTF???!!! I call her in to me, she only just manages to get onto my bed, and her head is bobbing like one of those bobble dogs you see now. I didn't drive at the time, so had to literally beg my Dad to get her to the Vet.

    He had the magic syrup ready for her as soon as we were out of the car, Robert was in the carpark administering to her... managed to get to his rooms before the barfing started. Solid green. And more green, and yet more green. It was so awful. She had to be irrigated (unsedated) to clean out her stomach. Because of the time span between her eating and it's removal from her system, it had already entered her inestines, so she had to be put into an induced coma for 4 days until the effects could be known.

    She came through it with no damage. I still can't understand how, to this day.



    Anyhow, back on topic, feed her what she wants to eat, in tiny amounts - maybe 6 - 8 times a day, until her tummy and her digestion gets back on line. Boiled or steamed chicken with rice or pasta for maybe a week, until there is no mucus in her poo.

    Fingers and toes crossed here for you... I had a good outcome, and hope that you do too.

  7. #7
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    Sounds like your vet has started the corect treatment, but you have to be obsevant for up to 5 days at least

    These products inhibit the enzymes responsible for recycling of vitamin K, which ultimately reduces production of certain blood clotting factors. There is no effect on circulating clotting factors, so a lag time between poisoning and bleeding problems is seen. The lack of coagulation factors causes the animal to bleed to death because the blood does not clot. First-generation coumarins may be deadly with a larger single dose or smaller doses over multiple days. Clinical signs are usually seen 3-5 days after exposure. Second-generation coumarins and indandiones are toxic with a single dose. Second-generation coumarins are a greater hazard than first-generation coumarins if the dog or cat eats a poisoned rat or mouse. Treatment once symptoms appear is more difficult, expensive, and has a much poorer prognosis than treatment that starts immediately after ingestion.

    If the pet is seen consuming the product, vomiting should be induced. Take the product package and the pet to the veterinarian immediately to begin further treatment. Treatment with vitamin K1 should be started within 24 hours.

    Veterinary Care
    General treatment: The induction of vomiting may be continued, gastric lavage is performed, and activated charcoal is administered.

    Supportive treatment: IV fluids are given. The blood clotting ability is monitored through laboratory tests before, during, and after treatment. Blood transfusions are given if necessary. The animal is kept quiet and confined to reduce the likelihood of causing bleeding to occur through injury such as bumping into objects and bruising.

    Specific treatment: Vitamin K1 is given. The oral form is reported to work better than the injectable form. The treatment is continued for 1-4 weeks depending on the toxin ingested. Vitamin K3 is not an effective treatment.

    Prognosis
    Good, if treatment begins immediately after ingestion. Guarded prognosis, if treatment is not initiated until after the pet shows symptoms.

    Well wishes hope it all goes well....Fingers and paws crossed
    Pets are forever

  8. #8
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    Sorry to hear about this it is so sad when your dog is sick . My dog had tick paralysis last year and was paralysed for a whole week.

    Sending speedy get well vibes to you all

  9. #9
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    Thanks for your well wishes and information. At this point she looks unscathed but I realise it is a few days before we can relax.
    I use no poisons at home and have cleared half my plants out of the verandah. Soo vigilant as she is a foodie. However &*^% happens I guess.
    The person who put the bait down is devastated.

  10. #10
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    Talon is the worst as far as dogs eating it. I'm really paranoid when I take my dog to my mum's place, because she uses it - supposedly in areas the dog cannot get to - but rats will carry the purple wax lumps to their nest or anywhere inbetween...

    Hopefully if you got it upchucked before any was absorbed into your dog's system your dog will be fine. The dogs that don't get to the vet for a few hours - are in serious trouble.

    Ratsak fast acting uses the same active ingredient Brodifacoum - treatment is Vitamin K1 (Phythomenadione) but recovery is not always possible.

    You really need to make sure the dog is kept really really quiet and no injury that might cause bruising or bleeding can happen for the next week or so. And the dog may get worse then better.

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