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Thread: Examples of Stupidity at it's finest

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    607

    Angry Examples of Stupidity at it's finest

    So, I need to vent.

    Piano Man and I were walking our dog Luke (semi reactive) and a dog we are minding, Ray (excited towards other dogs) through the walking trails around our house. They were on lead the whole time until we got to the local fenced soccer field, where I let Ray off for a run and some play time. There is a playground just on the other side of the fence where families were gathered with their children.

    Example One
    Out of nowhere this Groodle puppy, about 12-14weeks, comes running up and jumping and annoying Ray (being a puppy). Ray was tolerating the puppy barely so I put Ray back on lead and tried to walk away in hopes the puppy would get bored and leave. The owner was on the outside of the oval, had thrown her puppy over the fence and then chatted to whoever at the play equipment. The puppy was annoying Ray enough that he gave it a telling off snap if you know what I mean and we continued on our way. After the snap the puppy temporarily got he point and ran back towards it's owner before coming back to follow us around. The owner eventually climbed over the fence and grabbed her puppy as she could see we were annoyed by it. I tried starting conversation about it in hopes to speak about her dog and give her a few tips but she walked away back to the equipment where her children were playing. I think she was offended that we were annoyed with her friendly (overly boisterous) puppy.
    Gah!

    Example Two
    We were walking back from the oval through the trails. Everyone we came across with a dog, we would move to the side onto the grass or into the bushes to attempt to get some critical distance away from them to allow us to keep their attention as the dogs walked past. Luke did well, the dog we're minding...not so much but we coped.
    As we were heading towards a bridge we noticed two ladies on the other side walking towards us so before we got onto the bridge we decided to move to the side and (about 3-4m) into an open section behind a bridge barrier so they could walk past and then we could continue on....That didn't happen
    One of the ladies allowed her dog to attempt to pull itself under the fence barrier to get to Ray with me. She realised and said "oops" pulled him back out, to then allow him to walk straight up to Luke and sniff nose to nose. I saw Luk's body language and asked if the lady could please move her dog away from Luke just as he reacted and barked into the little dogs face to scare it away. PianoMan corrected the behaviour within an instant as the lady moved away in fear. She then muttered to her friend as they walked away "Perhaps they should be wearing a muzzle"
    GAH!!!!!!!!
    Perhaps you should notice that we moved a good 4 metres off the walking track and maybe that means we don't want your dog sticking it's face in our dog's faces...for everyone's sanity!!!!!!!!!!

    We are working on Luke's reactivity towards other (rude) dogs (he is fine with calm dogs) and he is doing well, but having ignorant people like this in society slows down the progress. I should probably tell people (with dogs) as they are walking towards us to give us a bit of space, but common sense should prevail, right? I mean who throws their new puppy into a fenced area and forgets about it for a few minutes??

  2. #2
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    Victoria, Australia
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    When i used to have cleo off lead i never let her out of my sight or get to far away from me. :/ And if she was cheeky and ran a fair distance i'd go after her straight away.
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    Exactly!!

    If you don't care about the other people's dogs, care about the fact that one of them may have a problem with your dog and injure it. Care about the safety of your puppy!!!!

    Maybe we looked safe...? Makes sense there

  4. #4
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    Victoria, Australia
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    Maybe you did.. lol I think sometimes people just assume your dog is 'nice to other dogs'... i dunno.. i was always worried with cleo around kids because kids excited her so much she'd find it hard to listen to me and sometimes kids got knocked over and stuff but i always told every one before they let there kids play with my dog that she'd jump and stuff. So i never got in trouble with it lol
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Gold Coast
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    ugh I have the same problem, I purposely move Barney to the side when I am walking him because I know how he is going to react around certain dogs, just over excited usually more than anything......and it's as if the people think I am doing it for the fun of it or something......or that he is dangerous and give me nasty looks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I think these days the clueless people about polite dog behaviour and dog law, are in the majority so if your dog is not friendly and you get out their way and they don't seem to take the hint and gather their dogs up into a close heel, you have to yell at them to keep their dog away.

    On the other end of the stick - my dog tried to greet another dog recently, and I stopped her, and I asked the other person if their dog was friendly (because it looked like it wanted to say hello too), and the owner was rude to me because she thought I'd let my dog greet hers without permission - which did not happen. Dog friendly, owner not. Sheesh. I hate being told off when I did nothing wrong.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Perhaps this should be a thread with everyone's examples of stupidity, in hopes that guests and new members will read it and learn basic dog/owner manners or just the "smart" way to own your dog...?

  8. #8

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    You are not helping a reactive dog by correcting it around dogs, you are creating a further bad association and you will make the reactivity worse.
    And in fact if he is telling a dog off for being in his face and rude, then why does he deserve a correction? If you saw his body language as being uncomfortable and wanting the dog to move away from him that means that he was displaying that particular body language to tell the other dog to back off, he was then ignored, so he escalated his warning to a bark/snap and then he was corrected for that behaviour.
    If you continue to correct appropriate warning behaviour, he will extinguish the behaviour and go straight to biting.

  9. #9

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    Every time I take Cindy to a dog leash free area (across our house) I still mind other people and make sure I get her in leash if someone just pop outs of no where, why? I do not want unnecessary attention and I don't want Cindy sprinting away from me lol
    m<(o.o)>m

  10. #10

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    Not being rude or poking the bear here again ....honest question.

    K&P , if not correcting/managing/dealing with reaction behaviour , what would you suggest happen? Just allow the reaction ? As some know I'm dealing with a reactive dog at the moment and I can assure you its not pretty there is simply no way it can be ignored.
    GageDesign Pet Photography
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