Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Shiba Inu - A family breed?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    3

    Default Shiba Inu - A family breed?

    My partner and I are thinking of adding a Shiba Inu puppy to our family.

    I feel as though the breed might not be suitable for our lifestyle and stage of family life. We currently have an almost 4 year old with aspiration to have more kids. We also have a deaf papillon x who is 2 1/2. We have a large back yard with high fences. Both of us work full time.

    My concerns are primarily, the safety of the kids and secondly, my deaf papillon who cant hear the warning growls of other dogs. Finally the exercise requirements of a shiba inu.

    My partners view is that it depends on how the pup is raised and i agree with this however believe instinct and genetics also plays a huge role in the temperament of any breed.

    I would love to have some feedback from people who have kept this breed or know of someone who has - please tell me your thoughts!!

  2. #2

    Default

    Shibas generally don't get along that well with smaller dogs and animals as they have a high prey drive. I was looking into them myself but was warned away by several people because I already have toy breeds.

    If you are getting a young pup then it may grow up fine with your papillon but I would probably stick to a more family based, laid back dog myself than an independant prey driven breed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

    Default

    I heard they don't really like to be annoyed by children they enjoy alone time.

    Edit: Could be wrong.

    Temperament

    The Shiba is alert, confident, courageous, and bold. Loving, kind, trainable and brave. They are clean and most try to avoid puddles and are relatively easy to housebreak. They bark little and bond closely with their handler. Playful and delightful, a well-adjusted Shiba is good with kids, other dogs and cats. Active, lively, agile and fast. Socialize this breed well as a puppy, as they can be reserved with strangers. If the Shiba is not completely convinced that its handler can handle the pack leader position and regards himself as stronger minded they will become a bit stubborn as they will believe they need to make up their own rules. Proper human to canine communication is essential. A natural hunting dog, the Shiba should not be trusted alone with small pets such as rabbits, guinea pigs, rodents and small birds. Be careful when taking them off leash as they like to chase, especially if they do not regard their owners as a strong pack leader. Adapts well to traveling. Make sure you are this dog's firm, confident, consistent leader, providing daily pack walks to avoid behavior issues.

    Shiba Inu Information and Pictures, Shiba Inus, Shiba, Shibas
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    3

    Default

    That is exactly what i have been reading!! The Shiba Inu may be an option for the far away future ( when the kiddies have left the coop that is) however from what i have read, not so much for now...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    I think they require a very experienced dog owner.......

    And i would always follow what the standard says..........Great dog for a single person I think or an adult family.

    There are awlway exeptions, but there is still a lot of "nature" in some breeds and it is not about how they are raised
    Pets are forever

  6. #6

    Default

    I have to agree with Newfsie here - needs to be an experience dog owner.
    Unless you have the time to spend with the pup and willing to take the pup
    to training
    m<(o.o)>m

  7. #7

    Default

    I looked at getting a Shiba Inu a little while ago but they have a very strong prey drive, I have birds so it wouldn't have been a good idea.

    They need a very strong leader to be well trained, as do most breeds that have a high prey drive.
    They seem more likely to bond to one person rather than the whole family.
    They need A LOT of EXERCISE!! So they may not be a very good match for very young children and small dogs seeing as they have so much energy.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

    Default

    Yeah i looked into one too because there was a breeder close by but realised it would be a bad idea for me. Apart from the quick house breaking part lol. Would of loved that. Which i think is what interests alot of people.
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    I haven't even heard about them.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    A friend in Whippets has one, spirited little thing he is. Think Akita only way smaller re personality.

    When I did my puppy trainers course one of my clients had one, he had them convinced he wouldn't wear a collar - screamed the place down. I just ignored him and had a collar on him in 5 seconds flat, so that gives you some idea.

    Not for the novice dog owner I would think but depends on what you want in a dog. My friends little guy is very sweet natured but then she is a very experienced dog person so has found him very easy to handle.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •