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Thread: Help with excited jumping

  1. #1

    Default Help with excited jumping

    Kahlua is a 25kg 1YO labradoodle. He has been to puppy school and dog obedience training since 12 weeks old. We always do the "triangle-of-temptation" every feeding time. He is generally what I would call an very well behaved dog.

    He would:
    - "sit-stay" for upto 10 minutes
    - "come here" at off leash dog parks
    - knows "inside" and "outside"

    Of course, he would also be naughty when the opportunity arise - stealing breakfast toast from the kids is his current favourite.

    But my real problem is that he would still jump on some people. He would not jump on me, but my 9 YO son and other little kids as well as my wife gets the worse of it. His teeth would also be showing (not aggressively, but just teeth exposed like a smile) so it can hurt. He would only jump when he is excited. I have tried all of the following and is running out of idea:

    - asking the person to turn their back and ignore
    - asking the person to turn away and walk into him
    - asking the person to leave the room and closing the door on him
    - the person shout out "HEY!!"
    - distracting him by giving him a "sit" command - he doesn't get too distracted
    - putting him out of the room whenever he jumps

    - spraying him with squirt bottle
    - even grabbing hold of his front paws and hold there
    - asking the person to push him off

    So, does anyone have any great ideas?

  2. #2
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    Any of my 4 get a knee to the chest if I see it coming and are told NO or are pushed away.. My hands are also held over them saying, no, gentle, gentle as I greet them all when they come inside. By a knee to the chest I do not mean any force is used. I would'nt suggest that kids do this though.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3
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    I have the exact same problem with my dog whom I adopted when she was 8mo and I feel your pain! We managed to get her out of jumping on us by consistently closing the door on her if she jumped, but it is so much harder to get enough other people to use this same method for it to really be effective. Mine is 18 months now and we are finally making some progress though, so I do have hope we'll get on top of the problem.

    My main concern at first was her jumping up on small kids. In the first weeks I had her she knocked a couple of small kids over and it is utterly embarrassing. She loves all people but used to especially love kids and I had to tackle the problem or I could've never let her off lead anywhere.

    That is when I learnt about the 'Look at that' method (LAT). And because I was already doing clicker training, I started doing that any time there were kids around. First on lead, then off lead. When there are kids about, I say "Look at that" (or now I use "Who's that" for people) and as soon as the dog then looks at the child/ren and then back at me, I click and treat. To my own amazement, this worked surprisingly well and to the point where she will now usually ignore most kids. Though I don't take any chances and will still occasionally use LAT when there's a child approaching us on our walks.

    I use the same method with people we pass on our walks. And it works too. If someone pats her or even talks to her, she will still jump though and it might take a few LATs to get her to stop and come get a treat. But that is slowly but surely getting better.

    The hardest one I found at home though. I actually threw a 'dog training party' the other night and got my guests to close the door on her if she attempted to jump. She kind of got it, but got much better when I also got the clicker and treats out and did LAT too.

    I have used time out too around house guests. Lock the dog in the laundry for about 30 seconds every time she attempts to jump. This seems to work quite well too, but because my guests distract me I sometimes forget I locked her away and leave her in there too long!

    ETA: I notice that you had used time out too. I think the key is to just choose one method for a specific situation and stick to it though. It's easy to get discouraged if it doesn't seem to work after a few times but some of these methods will probably start showing results if you implement them long enough. That's my theory anyway and I'm sticking to it! I never considered what a PITA it is to have a dog that is that fond of all people!
    Last edited by Beloz; 06-27-2012 at 04:35 PM.

  4. #4
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    Beloz's stuff really works, but it requires timing and continuous effort, which has to be maintained.........I like using that system for people who are really into training.

    The smiley thing is most likely just that...A lot of lab's, BC's and other breeds do this. My Tessa does too.

    Keeping a lead on the dog, whilst anyone is around might help if you are around and you ask the dog to do stuff, such as sit drop. I also find rewarding every sit ot even stand with no jumping is agin good, especially if the dog is familiar with clicker training.

    I also sometimes give kids treats to throw away for the dog to get...Some dogs who expect this after a few sessions learn to sit automatically, on return in front of the person after that. Person has to have treat on them, dog comes, person says "yes" or clicks and quickly throws the treat, this is repeated a few times..it is often the easiest, because it does not require a lot of timing, just repeating. hence it works for kids.

    Another one is walking around with a slice tin ( largest is best).....this is for the hard core dogs and non-timing people........Dog goes to jump up.....place the slice tray in the way. you do not hit the dog with it, the dog jumps into it. Loud bang, sometimes works

    You have tried all the other regulars, but I would love to see how they were tried..........many times people say they ignored the dog, but, they still look at the dog or engage with the dog. Ignore is total ignore...No sound, no eye contact at all. you can still push the dog away, so you do not get hurt. But you do not flap, or look...it is push, whilst you are looking away...no talking, telling off or anything. Actually quite difficult to do.

    We have a now 5 year old newfie who came to us as a jumping up on people rescue...he was lethal, 68kg of jumping. We come into the area he is......we do not look or talk, we keep walking forward, never back away and even lean slightly forward. We will push at him, if out of the corner of our eye we saw him jump. But we do not engage (talk, tell off) with him at all. I do not like the turning away from dogs, this can empower some dogs. I like my eyes to be seen, even if they do not look at the dog...

    He does not jump at all now and he was really bad.

    I know it is hard with kids, because they find the ignore very difficult......Anyway, good luck
    Pets are forever

  5. #5
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    asking the person to turn their back and ignore
    This is the most useful technique but it has to be followed up by putting naughty dog on lead. So what Newfsie said - if I know there's likely to be a problem or a major freak out if evil hound forgets herself - she goes on lead BEFORE she is tempted to jump on anyone.

    Certain people seem to encourage the jumping whether they mean to or not. Having the dog on lead gives you control. I usually ask for a drop, and then stand on the lead so she can't get up... if she's too excited to drop - I drag her away until she can pay attention to me again.

  6. #6
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    Consistency is the key. Jumping up is so self rewarding that everyone really needs to stick to the plan. It won't be cured overnight or in a week. But whatever option you choose give it your full attention and give it time to work before giving up and trying something else.

  7. #7
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    The lead doesn't do much for Banjo. She will just jump at the end of it. Though standing on the lead when she is in a sit - which I can only get her to do by constant treats for good behaviour BEFORE she starts jumping - does help. But not as a method in itself, if you know what I mean.

  8. #8

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    I agree the Look at That Game is effective when done consistently. If you google "leslie-mcdevitts-look-at-that-game" there are a few videos on the how.

    I would however recommend you trying to get hold of her book "Control Unleashed" which gives lots of good training advice and tips.

    In my experience the biting is a continuation of a Lab trait. They are mouthy and should be taught from an early age that biteing is a no no.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  9. #9
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    She will just jump at the end of it.
    This just means you're too close to the distraction (target for jumping) and you don't have a high enough distraction of your own ie your treats or rewards are not as good in her opinion as jumping all over whomever.

    Find a better treat or toy, or get further away, and then practice some good behaviour for reward. If she can behave nicely then she gets to take a step closer to the object of her desire, if she can't then step further away until she can. You may also want to investigate a head halter - if going further away is rarely possible/convenient. That gives you more control over her head. Ie you turn her head to look at you, reward, then relax your grip and see what choice she makes - if she looks away, you turn her head back - and try again. Only reward for the first time you turn her head towards you - so she knows there's something in it for her, and there after reward only if she looks at you without any halter help. LAT also involves a treat for looking at that but you need enough distance she can look back at you.

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