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Thread: Growling

  1. #31
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    Im kinda with choppa here.

    I expect my dogs to either put up with it, or move away.

    And I did type more but it was just sounding ridiculous coz Im so tired. But I ant go to sleep coz I am in extreme pain...I think I might need to poo but I cant and dont even feel one coming on so Im not really sure.

    Youre welcome for TMI LMAO

  2. #32
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    Wind pain can be excruciating. Got any prunes at home or an open supermarket nearby?
    24hr chemist as nutralax (sp) is WONDERFUL. It is just a heap of compressed figs, prunes etc and is yummy but for dog's sake DON't eat more than a teaspoon of it or you will get the runs.
    A triage nurse told me of that one, she had a mate staying with her and the mate ate about half a block of it and spent the next 3 days running to the toilet and there was only 1 toilet in her flat.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #33
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    Dec 2009
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    melbourne australia
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    I think the advice to not allow rough play would deny my dogs, such a lot of fun. Tug of war, and rumpussing, is what bernie really loves

    I am completely confident, that the dog wont bite me, or my family (immediate). And so they can play in this manner, as i know that even my daughter can regain control of the dogs and take them out of play drive.

    With others, i dont allow them to play with my dogs anyway. And i lock the dogs away when we have particular visitors, coz my 2 little nieces are viscous, and not under control AT ALL.

  4. #34
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    Oh I absolutely agree...rough play is a must.

    We have full on "dog fights" with ours where we get on the floor and everybody bites everyone and rolls over each other (obviously we dont roll on Pippi coz shed be paper thin after that lol). We get very rough and my dogs get extremely vocal about it...but that's kinda different.

    Di, yea might have to try that. Still very sore today - tummy (low just above the hooha), lower back and my butt (but not my actual butt - kinda up LMAO). Its bloody awful...farts are pretty painful too LMAO. Way too much info Im sure but I am a sharer - nice of me huh. My only concern is that im fully backed up. I get the runs quite frequently and I was reading today, you can still get the runs coming from the intestines around any back up hard stuff....charming.

    I will be sure and update everyone later coz I am sure you are all gagging to hear about my bowel movements LMAO

  5. #35
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    My daughter used to get that, Lala. The runs because of constipation.

  6. #36

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    I don't know. I think if you want a 'bomb proof' dog, increase your chances with a breed known for that sort of thing - staffies, pitbulls etc come to mind. Dogs with a high pain threshold that are unlikely to be phased by being stepped on, poked, prodded, bitten etc. I remember reading once that golden retrievers are actually very sensitive as a breed and it hurts them a lot when you pull their fur, so they are more likely to snap at children. Sammy on the other hand walked away after being hit by a car so you know different breeds different reactions to pain.

    I think you need to be fair. You wouldn't like it if the dog sat on the child - I don't think it's unreasonable for the dog to express this discomfort. Excessive force to resolve the issue is another matter altogether. Yes growling is a warning, but it's also maybe the only way the dog can express the fact that he is being hurt and would like the child to stop.

    One other thing I would say, teach your dog that you will resolve issues for them and all they need to do is make you aware. Sammy used to resolve his own problems with other aggressive dogs - not ideal obviously. I have taught him that I will protect him and resolve any problems (make the other dog go away) etc so I 'fight' his battles for him. Now if a dog is pestering Sammy, he simply comes to me, not in a scared fashion but just lets me know (and usually I have noticed already anyway) and I just shoo the dog off whilst he stands calmly doing his own thing to the side. Sammy is great with kids and once, a kid was trying to throw a stick for him and accidentally whacked him on the head instead. Sammy was unphased, he just waited for the kid to try again. But that said, he now knows I understand him and care and will do something if he's not ok with the situation (even if it's just to tell him he's being silly and to deal with it) and I have intervened before when I have felt that he's in a difficult situation with children. Kids can get obsessed with telling Sammy to do tricks and when he gets over it, they sometimes start telling him off - boys can even get a bit aggressive. So I tell them to give him some space and let Sammy go off to do his thing. When he wants to play with the kids I know he will do the right thing, but when he doesn't, that's his choice and he should be allowed to walk away (same as you wouldn't allow a dog to pester a child constantly).

    Living things are affected by what's going on around them and happening to them. If you want something that is 100% unreactive guaranteed, well, you need something without a pulse.

  7. #37
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    It goes without saying that I tell my child off for sitting on the dog. But kids will be kids. In one ear, out the other and most of them think they know everything better than mum by the time they can talk.

    But I had a chuckle at the "you wouldn't like it if the dog sat on the child". Hell yeah, I would! And she does. And I laugh my head off. And if said child starts whingeing about it, I laugh even harder.

    Something you probably only get if you have kids of your own...

  8. #38

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    In regards to the rough play thing. Some of the best dogs with children that I know are also training in Schutzhund. All dogs are different (some are much smarter than others) but plenty are well and truly capable of understanding context and playing without losing control. You can get Sammy as worked up as you like, he won't bite you. His paws are a different story though - I have had some amazing bruises from them... I think it also depends on your relationship with your dog - I used to think dogs would just think they were the boss if you had them on your bed, or let them win a tug of war game. Now I know there's much more to them than that.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    It goes without saying that I tell my child off for sitting on the dog. But kids will be kids. In one ear, out the other and most of them think they know everything better than mum by the time they can talk.

    But I had a chuckle at the "you wouldn't like it if the dog sat on the child". Hell yeah, I would! And she does. And I laugh my head off. And if said child starts whingeing about it, I laugh even harder.

    Something you probably only get if you have kids of your own...
    Lol well truth is I would trust Sammy 100% with any kids I had but I know other people might not appreciate it. Sometimes I worry that my standards aren't socially acceptable - there's a dog in my bed most nights...

    I don't know, as a child I was told, you piss a dog off, you will get bitten and it will be your fault. But we had rotties, old english sheepdogs and chihuahuas in the family, all breeds you need to be wary around...

  10. #40
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    It is an issue of trust, as you described, 99bottles.
    Such a good feeling when your dog comes to you for reassurance or help when he is feeling
    a bit threatened or if he thinks you may be feeling threatened and need him for backup.
    It sounds like you have a great relationship with Sammy.

    I understand the "paw" issue also. Snoops co-ordination is somewhat lacking and I cop the
    occasional split lip. A side effect of long legs, big paws and youthful exuberance.
    (people must think my husband beats me)

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