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Thread: Growling

  1. #21
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    I don't think dogs link the play growl and warning growl themselves, so I wouldn't think that ignoring a play growl would have an effect on the warning growl our vice versa.

  2. #22
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    I had one dog who used to just get up and walk away after he had enough harrassment when my eldest daughter was about 2 and a half. Attila was about 5 then. Oskar is still only 12 months and me personally, I think he is very patient. I am glad he give the little growl warning. That is all he does though.

  3. #23
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    I haven't read thru all the posts so may be repeating what's already been said but you say generally when she's sitting on her. Do you mean your daughter sitting on the dog? If so the dog could be in pain and is very nicely giving a warning, provided your daughter is old enough to recognise this warning and back off I wouldn't worry too much, but this depends on how dog savvy your daughter is.

    But preferably if I was you I would step in and tell your daughter to stop before the dog needs to growl.

    Also I don't know how old Banjo is or how good her hips are etc etc etc, but it could also be a bit of pain.

    I have a dog that has bone spurs and time and time and time again I tell my step-kids not to put pressure on her back or hip area as she is sore. You'd think after 9 years of living with me they'd get the message but they don't and they are 15 and 16 so I remind them each and every time they sit down next to her not to lay on her and she is a very loving dog who will take being petted all day and will demand it but cannot take it when they sprawl across her for no other reason than pain.

    A lot also depends on the dog itself. Some are clowns and some are more sensible, some like to elevate themselves above children and some don't.

    Play growling I don't worry about, but at the same time I wouldn't let a young child, say under 7 play games where the dog was growling at them, but I would myself. Hope that makes sense. I guess I've been to too many homes where I've seen that the dog clearly places itself above the children in rank in the house. I'm not saying that Banjo is like that at all, but I personally like to take the choice away from the dog.
    Last edited by MAC; 06-21-2012 at 11:50 AM.

  4. #24
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    My daughter does training with Banjo and I regularly give her responsibility over the dog on walks (on or off leash), so I don't think there is an issue with hierarchy there. But when they play they are like puppies. My daughter has fits of laughter when Banjo pounces on her and play bites. The more the child squeals, the wilder the dog gets. It's only an issue when either of them doesn't know when to stop...

  5. #25
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    Then it's one of those things where only you can tell.

    Though it does to a degree come across a bit like" Bernie and the b/f situation". Daughter is seen often as an equal play mate.

    For peace of mind I'd probably have daughter scale back the games just a bit. I'm super careful with dogs and kids, particularly in this day and age - I was at the hospital recently and a whole report was written up about a child and a single dog bite even though the parents said it was not at all the dogs fault - dog bashed cruciate ligament screamed in pain and child went to help while dog was in pain and confused & it snapped once and released straight away.

  6. #26
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    Through the years with various dogs and various ages of the kids if there was growling that was not done in play (Shads and one of my kids had great fun playing tug and both growling in play with the dog's tail wagging in joy) The kids were told STOP, enough, the dog needs space. STOP NOW and they were separated.
    The kids didn't know when to stop but I sure did and it was my responsibility to intervene.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #27
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    I would personally not like this.....especially if there is excitement involved...it is so easy just to tip the scales. Dogs are still dogs.

    We lived in a household full of kids and lots of dogs (GSD's) we were allowed to play and do stuff with the dogs, but never rough-play... No tug with the dogs, even though the adults did use it in training. I think it is just that the kids do no know when to stop, so to protect the dog from a possible bite incident, we had rules, very strict rules But you are still the one who has to make the decision. I think of it as protecting the kids and dogs.
    Pets are forever

  8. #28
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    My kids were always taught to be gentle with the dogs and the dogs always had to respect the kids also. I personally have just always felt that is was the right thing to do to discourage any aggression from the dog ,for any reason.

    At the same time, is never right for children to show aggression or play to roughly with dogs either.

    We had friends who had a 3 year old who used to torment my pitti x when they visited. it was so stressful as I had to chase after him to keep him away from the dog and his parents didnt care and wouldnt watch him or stop him.
    He would get a rake or a shovel and chase her trying to hit her or grab a leg and start dragging her around, she was so frightened.

    I was terrified she would snap and bite...and my very placid and loving dog would be PTS.

    So we just had to PADLOCK her and our geese and chickens in our garage when we Knew they were coming.

    it was a nightmare......but happens a lot unfortunatly. I once grabbed a large stick off a child that was about 6 years old as he had a dog on a lead and was stabbing it......i "accidently" poked the stick in his leg as I took it off him and took the dog to his parents who were sitting having a BBQ, who looked at me like I had 2 heads.

    Some parents get dogs as toys for children to amuse them so they dont have too and just dont care......., and I have stolen a pittie from a family once who was abusing the poor thing and found her a loving home....do i feel guilty? Not at all!

    Would i do it again....in a heartbeat!
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  9. #29
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    I just have to clarify that the growling doesn't actually happen during exited play. I think I just mentioned the rough play to paint a picture of their relationship but that probably was clear as muck. Lol

    But I think it's because they get so physical with eachother that my daughter thinks it's fine to lie on top of the dog when they're not actually playing and that's usually when a growl might happen.

    She would never hurt the dog on purpose, probably just thinks the dog is tougher than she actually is. But she will respect the warning and I'll keep telling her not to squash her.

    I just wanted to know if I should communicate something to Banjo too when she growls.

  10. #30
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    I don't say anything to Oskar, I just say to the kids "Leave him alone, he's had enough!' Poor bugger has two kids hassling him lol.

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