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Thread: A 1st ever aggro issue?

  1. #11

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    You have the golden opportunity to educate a future dog owner on how to be around dogs. Take him with you and teach him and Bernie to respect each other and to play nice. It is all part of Bernies growing up too.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

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    It is good to hear that he (BF) realises it is play....But the same needs to be kept in check. you have to remember that a lot of things dogs do starts in play and ends in not play.

    Most stock chasing in dogs start as play...And it becomes a habit and progresses into bite and sometimes kill.......Most people will say they are just having fun, but it often progresses and the dog goes into prey drive.....that is why as a Trainer I often do not alow "green-horns" to use prey drive, until they get the concept. Because at training classes you can see so many dogs (the large ones and small ones) put into prey drive the not so experienced handler looses control of them when small dogs or something runs by.

    I have spent many hours as an observer at many different Kennel Clubs/Obedience classes in Melbourne and see this "loss of control".....When all it was, was the dog was put into prey drive by the inexperienced.

    When I work with some people I never use Prey drive.....Those people just don't get it and are better just kept in what I call straight Obedience. It might be slower and not have the spectacular actions in heeling and agility, but the dogs are easier to handle.

    I am sure there will be some here that totally disagree.........So I will just put this in as in my opinion
    Pets are forever

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,638

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    When I work with some people I never use Prey drive.....Those people just don't get it and are better just kept in what I call straight Obedience. It might be slower and not have the spectacular actions in heeling and agility, but the dogs are easier to handle.

    I am sure there will be some here that totally disagree.........So I will just put this in as in my opinion
    I also think that some of the more reactive dogs are best not worked in prey drive and best kept under threshold. It very much depends on the dog and handler combination. An experienced handler can switch a dog in and out of prey drive as is required but this takes training and skill especially for the dogs at either end of the prey drive spectrum.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

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    Keeping Bernie out of prey drive. er....... that's not gonna happen.
    B/f wouldnt know drive initiation if it bit him on the arse.
    Spend time with B/F, nope. I cant do that.

    In order for b/f not to initiate prey drive, there must be no ball throwing, no wild birds (we are 30 paces to a lake) etc.

    Whilst it might seem harsh. The boyfriend is temp (hopefully, this one's a complete dud), my dog is for 15 yrs! Easier by far to prevent b/f and dog going out, than to keep a very high prey drive, trained in prey drive, who will seek drive satisfaction everywhere out of prey drive.

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