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Thread: dog boarding and obedience training

  1. #21

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    thanks for all the replies everyone.

    he really is an awesome dog, super energetic, always happy go lucky without any cares in the world. very smart too, he does know how to sit, drop, stay, shake hands and all that when 1 on 1 with him, but otherwise is super distracted when anyone else is around or when were out and about. its the same reason i want to train him properly as he can be very hard to handle at times. as i said i have trained him to do a few things, but he only listens when food is present. but the big issues with him is pulling on the leash, jumping on people, and going hyper around other dogs, eg when going for walks. i have tried different things to sort these out but it doesnt seem to work. there is a 2 part process in having a well trained dog. the dog knowing what to do and obeying the owner at all times. an amature owner trying to do teach both things to do the dog at the same time i find is very difficult. at least with a trainer that can teach the dog the actual actions, leaves the owner to work on the obeying part of the training only, thats why i think it would be easier to have the ground rules and basics taught by the professionals.

  2. #22

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    i do have to make a comment though on the industry being unregulated. it seems a shame so many bad stories are heard about dodgy so called professionals who damage these dogs who come to get trained by them. not every dog owner can train their dog, theres a myriad of reasons why and it varies dramatically, so wouldnt it be better to have someone train the dog for them, then to have a completely uncontrolled dog in the back yard that develops more problems over time? these dogs end up developing anxiety and anger issues, they get ignored, hit or abandoned without any affection, and worst case given to the pound, all because the owners are unable to teach their dogs how to behave and give up on them. this is where professional help is definitely a great benefit to both owner and dog.

    personally i think all puppies sold should be forced to attend some sort of training as part of the purchase agreement, whether it be by a professional 2 week course, or group puppy schools.

  3. #23
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    I'm sorry Tixx, but my - probably quite harsh - opinion is that if you are unable to train your dog at all, you should not get one in the first place and they may be better off with someone who can and will do the basic training. Not talking about you here, but about the examples you refer to with uncontrolled dogs in the backyard. I don't think owning a dog is a right that everyone should have. Exceptions are guide dogs and assistance dogs, but you know they get trained for over a year by someone they live with before they go to their permanent owners which is a far cry from 1 week training at a kennel.

    I have an overexcitable dog and it isn't always easy. But the thing that made me feel way more confident in being able to deal with the issues was when I learnt here about the Look at That (LAT) method. And about reward based training in general. As I mentioned before, I don't see an issue with a dog only working for food. Once the behaviour is thoroughly enforced, you can phase out the treats gradually and the behaviour will stick. Do a search on LAT on the forum if you want to learn more. I know I mention it a lot on here but that is only because without it, I would've still been feeling desperate with a dog who seemed to think that jumping on people was the ultimate goal in life. Now I have a dog who will readily focus on me when we pass people on the street (if I don't say anything she will actually "demand" a treat for doing the right thing, and I think that just shows how well she knows now what is expected of her) and we are finally making progress with stopping her from jumping all over visitors too.

    And I just don't know about someone else doing that kind of training with a dog because it revolves all around the dog looking to the handler for direction in those situations. One example I can think of is how we taught our dog not to jump all over us when we came home. When we finally found a method that worked, we trained her out of it in about 2 weeks. But it made zero difference to how she behaved when other people come through that front door. Some training transfers quite easily, like basic tricks, some doesn't because it requires working on the relationship between handler and dog. Being able to calm your dog in situations that they find highly arousing belongs to the second category, I think. Also, for those kind of behaviours to stick, you need to do lots and lots of practice in everyday situations and lots of proofing in different environments, which I believe only the owner can do.

    It's been an interesting topic for discussion in any case!

  4. #24
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    wouldnt it be better to have someone train the dog for them, then to have a completely uncontrolled dog in the back yard that develops more problems over time?
    If sending a dog away for training - achieved this - it would be great, but if a dog learns to work for one person who is a skilled dog trainer - they probably won't work for anyone else. Especially not an owner who thinks their dog would be better off learning from someone else. The owner - is just going to undo all the training when they get the dog back. And that's if the dog is willing to do anything it learned for the other person. A one hour hand over - won't fix the general lack of understanding and communication by the owner and the dog and between them.

    Dog training is pretty easy. You can set basic ground rules with five minutes a day - two tv ad sessions should do it. In fact hours of dog training can be worse than a few short focussed sessions. If you can't or won't - is owning a dog really for you?

    And you're right - a trained dog is much better than an uncontrollable one - left in the back yard as a rather destructive garden ornament.

    I'm happy for boarding kennels to be including some training as part of what they do - the mental exercise is as good and important as the physical exercise - I just don't expect my dog to do any of what they trained, for me, when I collect her.

    And I would avoid any place that uses any method that involves aversives (stronger than non reward marker eg "oops, try again") - as that is what can ruin a dog. Mistakes made using rewards can be fixed, but mistakes made that traumatise a dog - much much harder to undo.

  5. #25
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    Imagine your standard obedience or agility competition - with three rings set up side by side, with a dog and handler in each - and all manner of barking dogs and dogs and handlers practicing outside... what would happen - if the dog - once trained by one person, would work for anyone...you'd have to have each arena in a sound proofed vision proofed room with no other dogs or handlers present...

  6. #26
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    I've seen in house training work many times over and give a great foundation for the owners to go on with. Where I work we assess the dog as to the best method of training but in every instance there is food or ball (or whatever the dog likes as rewards), we always train in a conditioned reinforcer. Some dogs are in a check chain, but many are not.

    As I said before the dog isn't just dropped off at the owners place afterwards but there is an hour handover and an extensive booklet to read thru plus the training is guarantee for the lifetime of that dog and attendance at Saturday group classes is free.

    Dog must be in for a minimum of two weeks.

    As I keep saying if you want to work with dogs or be in the industry you must like people and not judge them too harshly. I'm proud of the fact that I've helped many dogs get out and about and become good family members. Less than perfect people do own dogs & some are very prepared to pay for someone else to help them.

  7. #27
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    Your right, there are many less than perfect people who are good owners but just not the best trainers (me being one of them)...and they love and care for there pets and deserve to own them... despite not being perfect.

    What is comfortable for one person, is not neccessarily comfortable for everyone, that dosent make them unfit to own a dog.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  8. #28
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    As I said before the dog isn't just dropped off at the owners place afterwards but there is an hour handover and an extensive booklet to read thru plus the training is guarantee for the lifetime of that dog and attendance at Saturday group classes is free.

    Dog must be in for a minimum of two weeks.
    This does require the owner to put some effort in and learn how to train the dog, and come back for followups if needed...

    I'm glad it gives some owners the boost in the right direction they might be needing. And the follow up classes - would be very helpful if they go. I bet there's a few dogs that come back every year - needing training again, and the owners never come to the follow up classes.

    I'm willing to take my dog 60+km for boarding, but not so keen to go that far for weekly classes. We did try it for herding classes a few times, but I found a bit hard to keep going. And the instructor moved to Tas. And I'm not going there.

  9. #29

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    all great points guys. i do agree on most of what is said, the best is training your dog yourself, but as i said earlier there area myriad of reasons why this doesnt happen.
    i also believe that a right handover from a pro trainer to an owner can be a successful training mechanism.

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