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Thread: Pulling and harnesses

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Ok I'm trying to picture a killer whale with a choke chain on it. Does not compute....

    I try not to use the chain on our daily walks because i use it as a 'training' tool, therefore my dog thinks it's 'school' time and she goes into serious mode. I want her to sniff about & enjoy her walk so i use her front attaching harness which gives her some leeway.
    I like this.

    But our daily walk incorporates "go sniff" (with permission), heel work - on both sides - and I'm not going to faff with a choke chain each time we change sides - not that I can use one of those on her without her shutting down completely. General trick training, and performing to amuse small children and their dog phobic parents, and in the off lead areas - start line stays and releases - so much fun. And play with other dogs (not good in a choke chain).

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    We just use martingale collars now, I used to use flat collars, but had one scary incidence when bagpipes stated beside us....Katy was in a panic and nearly backed out of her what i thought was a tight enough leather collar. Only happened once, but never again. Luckily my rope savvy from the horses allowed me to get the loop around her neck. I like the security of the martingale now.
    Pets are forever

  3. #23

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    to control a dogs mind is to control their body. dogs control each other through body language. dogs dont read minds. they act on instinct. think about it. its pure science aka dog psychology

  4. #24
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    Southern NSW
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    Body language is different to using power over the body...i use body language all the time. I do agility and most of that is body language and body position. I also use calming signs and body blocks. I am an avid student of dog language and horse language.....we work our horses with body language and have no equipment on them. I have to agree to disagree. Our dogs/horses follow my body language and they also have learned reaction to what we taught them, we got inside their minds. It is like a good recall, becomes automatic, it is learned (the mind)

    I will however tell you that not all my students "get this", so I need to be able to teach other methods, hence the "equipment" and "techniques", I teach recommend and show
    Last edited by newfsie; 05-24-2012 at 07:30 AM. Reason: left out horses
    Pets are forever

  5. #25

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    i am not even going to agree or disagree. have a look at my facebook. and you will see where i am coming from

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
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    There are lots of people here very knowledgable on dog training, Kev. Some are professional trainers, some have just had lots of experience with training their own dogs. We welcome debate, but no one claims their method (or their business) is the only right one.

    Newfsie, you got me onto the martingale for Banjo and I love it. She used to slip out of her flat collar all the time. Usually to go jump all over some poor unsuspecting person. Now she sits down when I grab her collar and she feels the pressure. The only thing I don't like is that the bit that makes it tighten (mine is just all material, no chain) always turns downwards. My daughter still forgets this and grabs the top of the collar which doesn't make it tighten and then Banjo still slips out. They should make them weighted so it always has the right bit up. I remember I had a flat collar for my old dog that always had the ring to clip the lead on in the right position because of the position and weight of the buckle. Hmm, maybe I should make some adjustments!

    Of course it isn't an issue with a lead, but I use the collar quite a bit when off lead too.

  7. #27

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    I agree with you Newfs. Training dogs is a mental game.

  8. #28

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    dogs do not rationalise. so there for there is no mental games involved. dogs act on pure instinct. the word training is for humans. it does not apply to animals for the simple fact that animals act on instinct. so in laymen terms it is pure science. it is that simple

  9. #29

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    oh... by the way. the people in this discussion, who actually works with dogs for a living?

  10. #30
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    Aug 2011
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    There are quite a few here, but I'm not sure why it would matter? There are plenty of bad dog trainers out there too whom I would not take any advice from. Same with any other profession really.

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