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Thread: My barking dogs and a very unhappy neighbour

  1. #11
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    Well done choppa!

    I also agree that a tired dog does not make a quiet dog, and not all dogs can even be made tired.

    Good luck op

  2. #12
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    I agree with you also choppa, no matter how much excercise Rex gets (and he gets ALOT) he always manages to have some energy leftover from somewhere to run along the fence line with the neighbours dogs. I'm just lucky he has good recall and i get him to stop.

  3. #13
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    thats why treadmills are such a great tool for bored and barking dogs. They're not just about exercise, they're about the fact the dog has to think very hard to coordinate all 4 legs to move together to stay on the treadmill, that is what wears them out. Exercise is about working and tiring the brain, not the body. That is what I mean about a tired dog is a quiet dog. I have used treadmills to help cure problem barkers, they work an absolute treat.

  4. #14
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    melbourne australia
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    Treadmills. I must be the only home in our family that does not posses one. We are also the only home in our large extended family that are not overweight, and we dont bark much either.

  5. #15
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    Apr 2012
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    On the topic of barking dogs, I have a couple of 12 week old Cardigan Welsh Corgi's. They bark at each other a lot, especially when we let them out first thing in the morning, and I worry about them waking up the neighbours or a rat-poisoned steak being thrown over our fence. My wife and I would like to take them out for exercise and walks, but our vet has told us not to take them out until two weeks after their 16 week booster vaccinations - that's another 6 weeks away. If an exercised dog is a satisfied dog which barks less, how do we exercise them at home in our yard? (They haven't learned fetch yet and we don't own a treadmill).

  6. #16

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    Welcome to the forums Fosandebo

    In your case I would be suggesting that to begin with your youngsters are only barking at each other in play,being happy etc .... I dont think the exercising till tired would apply just yet

    How long do they bark?
    Is it hours or a relatively short period of time? Is it continuous?

  7. #17
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    Apr 2012
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    Adelaide
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    Thank you for the welcome, ChoppaChop.

    You're right, they are just playing, being happy, etc. Just yesterday they started barking at people walking past our fence (a high fence). They generally just continually bark at each other for 10-15 minutes admist play fighting. When we first let them out in the morning, at 6-something a.m., they are full of energy and and bark the most; that's when I'm concerned the most - because our neighbours might be sleeping or at least tired and grumpy.

    The rest of the day they sleep, eat, playfight some more, bark some more and, of course, poop.

  8. #18
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    Hya, I had to go back to read the older posts because I had not made the link and I do understand your frustration. But what is done is done...

    I don't know if the situation has changed and the dogs get more interaction with their owner now. I leave my back door open for my dog to prevent her from barking. I don't know if she would if I wouldn't do this, because that has been the arrangement since I got her. But I reckon not kicking the dog out when you leave the house must prevent some frustration. And dogs are usually less likely to bark when they are inside.

  9. #19

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    We have an ongoing problem with our dogs too. There are four all together, two which had isolation distress (barking and urinating inappropriately). All dogs if left outside barked at people going past, the neighbours dogs, people doing yard work etc - so I simply had to keep them inside with the air con on a timer. Over 4 years, we have made some progress towards solving the problem. I purchased anxiety wraps for the 2 anxious dogs and fed them a small amount of rescue remedy. I also changed all of their food to corn free biscuits (can cause allergy and hyperactivity in some dogs) and play a special dog calming cd when I go out.

    When I used to video the dogs, I noticed that the most anxious one would start attacking the door (to the point that he injured his nose) as soon as I left and the other anxious dog barked AT him. Fortunately once he was under control (the anxiety wrap , RR and music really worked on him) the other one barked less. She still has a bit of a problem (she manages to clean out kongs and nina ottosson toys like a pro) and is very hard to tire out and keep amused, but she has improved. I also do an hour long walk before I leave because she goes psycho if she doesn't get one. They are still bad if I leave them at night and usually get somebody to stay over if I expect to be out later than about 8-9 pm.

    Exercise is probably a big problem with your two bigger dogs due to their young age and high energy levels. If you can't afford a treadmill you might need to train them to fetch a ball in a dog park (if your yard is too small) or run alongside a bike. The food you give them might also be contributing to hyperactivity - if the dogs are prone to allergy a corn free biscuit (I use canidae from www.pawsforlife.com) diet might quieten them down a bit. Otherwise, is it at all possible you can keep them inside (or at least access a dog proof part of the house), or get someone to check on them in the day?
    Last edited by brutusbelle; 04-11-2012 at 01:28 PM.

  10. #20
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    fosandebo

    It would probably be ok to organise play dates with other dogs you know have been vaccinated. Or enrol in puppy pre-school - usually with your local vet, or the local corgi club should be able to recommend someone in your area.

    It's a difficult balance between keeping your puppies safe from disease or socialising them with other dogs so they learn how to greet other dogs and people politely and get plenty of mental exercise.

    A general rule of thumb for puppies - is 5 minutes of exercise per month of age - so at the moment 10 to 15 minutes around the back yard is probably more than enough - even though they seem to be ready to go again 30 seconds later.

    You may also want to investigate trick training or shaping (sometimes known as clicker training) just to engage their brains a bit. Like go to your bed, come here, sit, drop, stand, beg, roll over etc. Little sessions of this - about 30 seconds or 10 treats worth at a time.

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