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Thread: loyalty

  1. #1

    Default loyalty

    SO i have a dog, hes a mutt from the pound about 3-4 years old. He isnt obediant unless i have food and he is unable to come indoors because he jumps all over everyone and licks you all over. I need help to train him, I want a dog that is loyal to me, who i can have sleep in my room when winter comes. How can I teach him some manners, I want him to come inside and lye down. I want him to stop racing around the bark yard barking all the time. I want to be able to walk him without a leash and have him come when called. what can i do?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    Be prepared to put in lots of effort for a few months to achieve this and you will do fine. Having a dog that is motivated by food is a great start. But you have to learn how to make use of that to condition him into associating following your cues with good things.

    The first thing you have to realise is that your dog does not understand a word of what you say and has absolutely no idea what you expect of him. The second thing is that you need to give your dog an incentive to do what you want him to do. You won't have to do this forever, but for quite a while until his responses have become almost a reflex.

    I wish I had kept a list of the resources I read when I started training my dog as I found some of them very useful.

    Coming when called: do a search on "recall" on the site to find some advice. It takes lots of practice, but if you are consistent you will be successful.

    Being calm inside: you can either teach your dog to go to his bed and stay there, or you can crate train him. But it is also possible that once you teach your dog some of the other basics and allow him inside more, he will just calm down naturally. Maybe just totally ignoring him when he is wild might make a difference.

    Jumping up. My dog was a terrible jumper when I got her at 8 months. The only thing that worked to stop her from jumping up on us was this. We would open the front door (my dog always has access to the house, you could do the same when you go out through the back door) when we came home and if she made any attempt to jump up, we would just back out again and close the door for a few seconds. We would keep doing this until she stopped trying to jump and only then we would go in. But even after we had gone in and closed the door behind us, if she tried to jump then, we would just go out again. I did this after we tried a range of other things and it was the only thing that made her stop jumping on us and it probably only took a couple of weeks to enforce this. You have to be consistent though.

    Jumping up on other people is still a bit of an issue and instead of asking visitors to go out, I will put the dog in time out in the laundry for 30 seconds or so if she tries to jump. This also works, but it requires lots of focus. I sometimes get distracted by our visitors and then I stuff up, which is probably why I haven't been able to completely change the behavior yet.

    I would recommend you go to training classes or at the very least read some books on dog training. I liked "Click for joy", which explains the basics of clicker training. It's not the only method for dog training but it greatly helped me in understanding the basic principles of training.

    There are lots of experienced dog trainers on this site who can give you great advice based on years of experience. I've only trained two dogs and only this time I feel I've been doing it quite well and feel in control. And I always feel driven to pass this on to other people who have not experienced the joy of training a dog. Because if I can do it, anyone can.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    I second going to training and obedience classes. Not only will you have a trained dog (if you put in the effort) but it will help create a stronger bond with your pup as well.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I would say you dont have a loyalty problem at all. His idea of showing you love and affection is to jump up and lick.
    With time and patience you can change his idea of loyalty into your idea of loyalty.

    I just finished our first basic course of training......$50 for seven weeks of training and lots of easy reading material to study. The best 50 bucks i've ever spent. I could not have done it by myself in such a short time. I'd be looking for a local obedience club...it's good fun for you and the dog too.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Hi green, all of the above, mixed with a lot of kindness, patience consistantsy and food treats. What breed is he?
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  6. #6

    Default

    he's a mix and match, we think hes got some boxer and a tonne of other stuff. hes pretty much a big pig dog, like the kind of dog a tradie might have. The problem with obediance classes is that when he sees another dog, he barrels them over and barks and yelps, and then the other dog gets angry and their owner gets angry. Hes not agressive he just doesnt know how to act around other dogs.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Logan, Brisbane QLD
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    persevere with the obedience classes, get him use to being around other dogs - soon the excitement of having other dogs will wear off. Most great trainers will assist you on these issues during or after class. Our instructors always ask us if we have problems at home at the end of every lesson and will give us tips and ideas on how to control the problem. If you feel uncomfortable in the classes try a trainer/behaviourlist that can come to your home and help.

  8. #8
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    The problem with obediance classes is that when he sees another dog, he barrels them over and barks and yelps
    At obedience club / classes - it's usual to keep your dog on lead short enough to prevent this happening. Until he can show some self control. If you want some one on one help - there's plenty of people we could recommend if you let us know where you are. You could go to an obedience club a few times without your dog so you can see how other people teach their dogs.

    Here's a few links of info that might help
    Home-Reward-Based Dog Training
    Become More Exciting Than a Squirrel: Teaching a Reliable Come When Called | Animal Behavior and Medicine Blog | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS
    and you probably want to read all of these
    Dog Behaviour Articles FREE! K9 Pro The K9 Professionals
    starting with the NILIF and the TOT ones.
    ie your dog needs to learn self control and all good things come from you (not from being a PITA).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Geelong, Vic
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    Leerburg Dog Training | 16,000 pages of dog training information, 300 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis has a lot of free training articles. The trainers at dog club should be helping you control him and not letting him run wild, what area are you in?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Perth, WA
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    I can also highly recommend the obedience classes.

    My dog can be a complete psycho at training and the trainer will always help me control her and show me some training tips (Ruby is a lot more toy focussed than food focussed, so I find a squeaky toy in the box of stuff, my well prepared food treats don't interest her at all once she's in that high state of excitement). The trainer does a demonstration, and if there's a dog that's over-excited or not concentrating, she'll often use that dog. Sometimes I think she'll never learn, but then last weekend she was really good for over half the lesson, that's never happened before - maybe it's sinking in

    Good luck, you'll get there with practice ... and loads and loads of exercise, a tired dog is a good dog..

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