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Thread: Inside Not Okay to Go to Toilet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Perth WA
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    Default Inside Not Okay to Go to Toilet

    Hi,

    I'm sorry to be one of those people who sign up and ask a question straight away but my husband and I are stuck on a problem.

    We foster dogs that need work to go home with families as with older ones, they are more likely to get adopted if behavioural issues are stemmed and basic training is implemented. We usually get untrained adult dogs.

    We have a staffy labby cross, about 3 years old and a problem I've never experienced before. My mates at the shelter are stumped too and suggested I come here.

    The boy has been raised inside only, it appears through the training he was locked inside all day allowed to do what he wanted. Through the training, we have been able to fix most bad habits bar one. Through positive training he is now happy to go to the toilet outside and at night goes when we get up and encourage him to do so as he now understands outside is the good place to go. However if we are asleep, he goes inside. We are up every 1-2 hours as with a puppy,but it hasn't helped. It appears that he has been allowed to go inside at any time. Therefore his current understanding is that we are happy if he goes outside, but inside is second best. We are still to catch him doing it as he only does it when we are asleep so can't stop him and get him outside. If we are up during the night, he goes outside. How do we train him to go outside when we are asleep or wake us up to walk with him to the doggy door? He doesn't have problems using the doggy door anytime once we trained him to go through it. All day he pops through it when he needs to go, at night he goes through it with prompts and some of the time will go (as his bladder holds on for around 6-8 hours now.) Our trainer suggested just continuing what we are doing but it's been 6 weeks now. My husband and I are feeling exhausted from alternate wake ups all night.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Hi squishy prihana

    Firstly, WELCOME TO THE FORUM

    Secondly, how long have you been fostering this current dog? Some dogs take a few weeks to work out that the house is their den and outside is for toileting.

    Does he go outside in the evenings by himself while you're awake, watching tv or whatever you do at night? If no, he may be afraid of the dark, so to speak :P You said he lived inside most of the time, therefore probably has limited socialisation with outside night time. This can be helped by taking him outside at night and playing games etc to get him more comfortable out there.

    Does he have a spot in the yard designated for toileting? This could also help, as he would associate that place only with going over anywhere else, including the house.

    Also, have you considered crating him at night so he can't go and pee? If he can hold his bladder then this shouldn't be a problem and will help give you a good night sleep.
    Dogs naturally don't like to toilet in their den and crate training will make an immediate den, allowing him to learn quickly not to pee in there. In saying that, given his past history of toileting inside, there is a possibility this will take linger to learn than the average dog, patience and consistency is the key to this one

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    607

    Default

    Sorry I spent your name wrong :P

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    607

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Pawfectionist View Post
    Sorry I spent your name wrong :P
    Haha, I totally can't SPELL today :P

  5. #5

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    Welcome and good on your for fostering needy older dogs

    Crate him at night. He won't toilet in/on his bedding. He should be able to hold all night in the crate just fine and then let him straight outside in the morning.

    Having a crate will come in handy in the future for other foster dogs as well. A crate trained dog is much easier to handle, much calmer, easier to toilet train and is less stressed when it has to go to places that do have crates. All round better for everyone especially the dogs new family.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
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    3,784

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Welcome and good on your for fostering needy older dogs

    Crate him at night. He won't toilet in/on his bedding. He should be able to hold all night in the crate just fine and then let him straight outside in the morning.

    Having a crate will come in handy in the future for other foster dogs as well. A crate trained dog is much easier to handle, much calmer, easier to toilet train and is less stressed when it has to go to places that do have crates. All round better for everyone especially the dogs new family.
    If it happens when you are asleep, I would also crate train, unless he can have access to the out and in (doggy door)
    Pets are forever

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

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    Agree with others, crate train. Can he sleep outside or is sleeping inside part of the foster training?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    I would open the back door. Forget the dog door, and if you've a house with a laundry leading out to the back, make that the sleeping place.
    During day, train him to use dog door, and he gets lots of praise for using this. And a jackpot of goodies if he pees in correct spot.
    Keep the toilet area specific in the garden, this helps also.

    If you have a crate, use it at night. Smaller the better if you have an extending one. Just enough room for a dog on a bed and water bowl. As dog will be reluctant to pee his bed.

  9. #9

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    I know a lot of people will disagree with me but you might want to be aware of other options. Crating is probably a good idea, but I was in exactly the same situation with my dog, and managed to fix the problem without crating. He would go outside when I was around because he wanted the praise and rewards. He would go on command and quickly learned the word toilet. But if he was inside and I was doing something else, he would just take himself into the hallway or something, and go there. I kept him with me at all times and he was perfect, but when I started to give him more freedom because I thought he was trained, he would just pee inside the first chance he got. It was like, as you said, he knew outside was better, but he didn't see what was wrong with inside, and he didn't want to go all the way outside just to go to the toilet.
    He got to 5 months and was still going inside, it was terrible. So one day, after speaking to his breeder, I changed my tactics. I waited and watched until I caught him going inside in the hallway. And I corrected him. I did this a few times, and he stopped peeing inside. Hasn't done it since. He needed a reason to go outside, but he also needed a reason not to go inside.
    With my new puppy, I used the same method right from the get go. Positive reinforcement for going outside, negative associations with going inside. I wait and watch until they go inside, catch them in the act and reprimand them - take them straight outside and then praise when they finish there. She was toilet trained by 3 months, and now opens the door to take herself outside to go (she is only 4 months old now).

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