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Thread: I seriously need HELP..

  1. #31
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    I like the sound of that phuds stuff. But it doesn't have any info on quantities? How much would you use a day for a medium 20ish kilo dog? Just trying to determine if I can afford it.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I like the sound of that phuds stuff. But it doesn't have any info on quantities? How much would you use a day for a medium 20ish kilo dog? Just trying to determine if I can afford it.
    My dog weighs 20.5 kgs (I know this from the bee sting episode on Monday). We mix 1kg of mince with 2 cups of phuds and 2.5 cups of boiling water. This lasts him about 3 days. He is a pretty lean boy and we like to keep him that way We did a little spreadsheet, based on the price for each bag of phuds with chicken mince. The chicken mince we get is quite cheap, but good. If I knew how to attach the spreadsheet I would. But basically...

    If you buy a 10kg bag of phuds and the mince is $1.30 per kg then it costs approximately $0.50 per day!! If you buy a 1kg bag of phuds and kanagroo mince or something at $10 per kg then it will be approximately $2.17 per day. Which if you think about it is still good value when you compare it to supermarket tins and the like.

    Oh yeah, and the 10kg bag lasts us a month or two. Worth getting, I say.

    I love it so much I have inquired about wholesale prices so I can suggest and sell it to my clients

  3. #33

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    teach your dog to play ball. 1hr a day at the park playing ball should wear him out. if you can get him to the park twice a day would be even better. Staffy's do eventually grow out of this sort of behaviour but in the mean time keep him tired. also teach him what naughty means, so when you find something chewed up you have a word that makes him understand that he has done something unnacceptable.

    as for growling at the kids, i would be concerned. it is not normal for staffy's to behavce like that. maybe see a vet, but definately get someone who knows w2hat they're doing to assess the growling .... its possible that this could lead to worse if not sorted

    food - i feed jack 300g of 3 star coles mince with somer grated veg, alpha alpha and stuff to bulk it up a bit. 3 star mince is like $6 a kilo sp only a bit over $2 a day to feed him. he weighs 17kg

  4. #34

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    Dogs dont understand what they are being scolded for after the fact. You need to catch them in the act to apply any pubishment for it whether that be a word or a consequence.

    Actually growling IS normal dog behaviour for any and every breed. It means you are worrying me with how you are behaving or I feel like you are going to do something threatening or hurt me please back away. Toni needs to find out WHY the dog feels that way about her nephew and rectify the cause of the growling. At this stage management is probably best ie: dont let the nephew near the dog, dont have arguments with her son in front of the dog.

    The dog has major behavioural issues and health issues a cheapo brand of processed supermarket food will make these issues much worse.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Dogs dont understand what they are being scolded for after the fact. You need to catch them in the act to apply any pubishment for it whether that be a word or a consequence.
    i sort of disagree. Obviously if they've never been taught a particular behaviour is bad they won't understand(so yes initially catching them in the act is important, but i don't agree absolutely imperative) but i can guarantee you Jack understands when he's done the wrong thing. I've never hit him or anything like that, just used the one word and then put him outside with a particularly stern voice. Nowadays(and this has been for i'd say 4 of his 6 years) if i find something ripped up(hasn't happened for probably close to 4 years) and i go over to it and say naughty, he slinks away. Likewise on the few occasions he's crapped inside, on these occasions i have no intention of telling him off cause its my fault, but he won't even go into the room as he knows its unacceptable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Actually growling IS normal dog behaviour for any and every breed. It means you are worrying me with how you are behaving or I feel like you are going to do something threatening or hurt me please back away. Toni needs to find out WHY the dog feels that way about her nephew and rectify the cause of the growling. At this stage management is probably best ie: dont let the nephew near the dog, dont have arguments with her son in front of the dog.
    ok, yes, growling is a normal dog behaviour, but its not normal for a well trained/socialised staffy to exhibit such behaviour. maybe my bad for not spelling it out properly?

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    i sort of disagree. Obviously if they've never been taught a particular behaviour is bad they won't understand(so yes initially catching them in the act is important, but i don't agree absolutely imperative) but i can guarantee you Jack understands when he's done the wrong thing. I've never hit him or anything like that, just used the one word and then put him outside with a particularly stern voice. Nowadays(and this has been for i'd say 4 of his 6 years) if i find something ripped up(hasn't happened for probably close to 4 years) and i go over to it and say naughty, he slinks away. Likewise on the few occasions he's crapped inside, on these occasions i have no intention of telling him off cause its my fault, but he won't even go into the room as he knows its unacceptable.
    But how do you know if the dog understands that you are talking sternly to him because of what he has done or is just reacting to your angry voice? I used to believe dogs understood, but I'm not so sure anymore. Especially after I used a stern "What. Is. That!" on Banjo once when I found something she had ripped up and when I used the exact same phrase in a normal tone a week later when talking to my daughter, the dog slunk away! So I am not at all sure that she linked me telling her off with ripping something up at all.

    (Silly PS: Isn't 'slunk' a silly word?)

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    i sort of disagree. Obviously if they've never been taught a particular behaviour is bad they won't understand(so yes initially catching them in the act is important, but i don't agree absolutely imperative) but i can guarantee you Jack understands when he's done the wrong thing. I've never hit him or anything like that, just used the one word and then put him outside with a particularly stern voice. Nowadays(and this has been for i'd say 4 of his 6 years) if i find something ripped up(hasn't happened for probably close to 4 years) and i go over to it and say naughty, he slinks away. Likewise on the few occasions he's crapped inside, on these occasions i have no intention of telling him off cause its my fault, but he won't even go into the room as he knows its unacceptable.



    ok, yes, growling is a normal dog behaviour, but its not normal for a well trained/socialised staffy to exhibit such behaviour. maybe my bad for not spelling it out properly?
    The reason dogs slink when they have done something wrong, is because of the vibes the owners give off..........if you were purely neutral, the dogs would not slink. Dogs respond to your reaction. If you smiled and said good dog, he would be happy too, even if he had destroyed your house
    Pets are forever

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    But how do you know if the dog understands that you are talking sternly to him because of what he has done or is just reacting to your angry voice? I used to believe dogs understood, but I'm not so sure anymore. Especially after I used a stern "What. Is. That!" on Banjo once when I found something she had ripped up and when I used the exact same phrase in a normal tone a week later when talking to my daughter, the dog slunk away! So I am not at all sure that she linked me telling her off with ripping something up at all.

    (Silly PS: Isn't 'slunk' a silly word?)
    Experience ... i could go up to jack now and say NAUGHTY in the most stern voice and he'd just look at me with a "what?" expression. He knows! Maybe i'm just lucky but i doubt it.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    The reason dogs slink when they have done something wrong, is because of the vibes the owners give off..........if you were purely neutral, the dogs would not slink. Dogs respond to your reaction. If you smiled and said good dog, he would be happy too, even if he had destroyed your house
    This doesn't explain why Jack won't go into the room he's crapped in?

    eta : not a problem anymore as he has a doggy door but i've never ever got angy at him for going to the toilet inside as i KNOW its my fault.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    This doesn't explain why Jack won't go into the room he's crapped in?

    eta : not a problem anymore as he has a doggy door but i've never ever got angy at him for going to the toilet inside as i KNOW its my fault.
    Because it stinks.....

    On your comment about well socialised dogs/Staffys not growling. Yes a well socialised dog will growl, in fact its the under socialised dogs you have to worry about because often they wont issue the warning (a growl) and go straight to biting.
    A well socialised dog has learnt all the required warnings/escalations. Just because a dog is well socialised doesnt mean they are impervious to things that cause them stress or pain or have to put up with anything and everything (just like you wouldnt be expected to, if someone was making you feel uncomfortable you would issue a warning something like "back off buddy") The difference between a well socialised dog and one who is not is that it will follow the appropriate levels of escalation ie:subtle body language (head turned, lip licking, yawning), then escalate to freezing, growling and whale eye before biting.
    I have an undersocialised dog (my first) she shows little warning and it has taken me 12 months to pick up on her subtelties but she goes from minor body language to biting in less than 10seconds (this is with my other dog she has never had a chance to get near another dog) thankfully she has learned bite inhibition anither important part of socialisation and early training because if your dog ever does feel the need to escalate past growling they should be able to inhibit their bite so as to not cause major damage.
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 02-03-2012 at 09:42 PM.

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