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Thread: I took my dog camping..

  1. #11
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    Jan 2012
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    I have been doing the biting/no more play thing ever since i got her at 5 weeks, she is now about 3/5 months. I agree that she would of been unsettled while we camped as it was her first time and it was for four days and it was hot and she was always on the lead. When the kids wanted to pat her i put her on 'break' meaning i stood on her lead and gave her just enough room to sit. That is what my trainer told me to do. I think i might have to try the crate idea, I do keep her in a pen at night time every night at home. But she got desexed today so i will probably do that less and less. I only did it for my own paranoier that she might get out or that someone would steal her lol. She also got microchipped. Newfie thank you for the help i may have to try those things.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    It's the only time really that I regret not crate training my dog, when we go camping. I think that home away from home would be quite comforting for most dogs.
    why dont you just crate her anyway when you go camping? So she has a safe spot.

    I have never crate trained any of my guys but when Barney hurts his hips/back, I just chucked him n one for like a whole week and he was fne...I also crated Pippi too...no arguments. Or are my guys just abnormal in that they just accept everything like that lol

  3. #13
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    Dec 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    It's the only time really that I regret not crate training my dog, when we go camping. I think that home away from home would be quite comforting for most dogs.

    We have a small caged trailer which doubles as a crate. When camping, our dogs put up with the small kids, but its nice that they can escape the pinching fingers during the day. This is also their "kennell" once its unpacked at home.

    Crates can be purchased 2nd hand rather cheaply. Or made up with sheets of wire fencing nailed onto wooden batons and those cable ties.

    We use time out a LOT in this house. A traffic light system: red = doggie behaviour, out in the garden Orange = your getting a bit hectic, settle please on your bed Green = go nuts, i like this behaviour, you can stay in doors for being so good.

    Camping is a very weird experience for dogs. And some camps are far better than others. We have just returned from camping in SA. Camp site was rack em and stack em, i could of cooked on a neighbours stove it was that close. My dogs did not enjoy this holiday as they had to be chained at all times. But neither did i, so you win some, you lose some.
    Unusually, they were very very vocal. I interpreted that as "i dont like it here", im chained up so i'll gob off and gaurd this area diligently with barking. Can you blame them?
    We generally go bush to avoid this.

    Time out can be in the back of the car. You dont necessarily need a crate in situation you describe. Just somewhere 'apart' 'familiar' and 'quiet'.

  4. #14
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    I once took my old dog to one of those cramped caravan parks and I thought it was miserable too. We now go to 'primitive camping grounds'. Not totally bush - there's water and toilets - but distance from the neighbours and plenty of adjacent bush. Downside is that the wildlife keeps the dog awake at night.

  5. #15
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    Regarding camping and having to tether your dog for long periods.
    2 weeks prior to our camping trip, we did Triangle of Temptation training with Pohm. Which involves tethering dog, getting it to settle, then feeding it dinner as its reward.
    Excellent result: will be tethered on a chain, all day quite happily, with plenty of frequent opportunity to get off it and go nuts! And i had a fab excuse to give the extended family, whilst i was taking my own time out and destresser. It worked for us both

  6. #16
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    Jan 2012
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    Victoria, Australia
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    The place i went camping has 10 camp sites, we go in the smaller camp sites that can fit about ten tents in there. I don't think it was that crouded.. but maybe she thouht different. I don't know when we are next going but we will just have to see how it goes.. I can't really put her in the car as time out because she doesn't really like the car. While i was alone with her at the beach i let her run around and she enjoyed that. But i couldnt stay there to long because i got bored. lol. And she was starting to run to far away from me and she doesn't come to 'come' very well yet.

  7. #17
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    Maybe next time you should try and make some more time for long walks with her to tire her out? My dog comes back completely knackered from camping and after one day she will start plonking down to rest at every opportunity. As long as there is nothing exiting going on of course.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogWhispererKev View Post
    ... Dogs are born to lead unless told otherwise.
    Sorry guys, this is a tad OTT;

    I'm gonna call crap on the above comment. Very, very few dogs are born with the ability to lead, and a dog thrust into leadership he/ she is not able to cope with will be unhappy, stressed, perhaps neurotic and likely have 'aggression issues'.

    Good dog owners practice something akin to good parenting (without anthropomorphizing) where clear, consistent rules and boundaries are set, good Behaviour is acknowledged and rewarded and undesirable Behaviour has consequences.

    I have known one alpha dog in my experience so far, and I doubt we have any members here who would have lived comfortably with that dog (me included).

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Sorry guys, this is a tad OTT;

    I'm gonna call crap on the above comment. Very, very few dogs are born with the ability to lead, and a dog thrust into leadership he/ she is not able to cope with will be unhappy, stressed, perhaps neurotic and likely have 'aggression issues'.

    Good dog owners practice something akin to good parenting (without anthropomorphizing) where clear, consistent rules and boundaries are set, good Behaviour is acknowledged and rewarded and undesirable Behaviour has consequences.

    I have known one alpha dog in my experience so far, and I doubt we have any members here who would have lived comfortably with that dog (me included).
    Good posting.

    Couldn't agree more.

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