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Thread: Dogs going crazy at the back fence ...........

  1. #11

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    The main problem is that the size of the dog park makes it impossible to get to him in time. It's like he's on the lookout for dogs outside the park. That and he's quite evasive and you just end up looking like a right goose when you try to catch him. I understand where' you're coming from with the obedience training. Unfortunately, being a rescued/pound dog, he didn't receive any training at all and now that he's 3 years old, he's quite set in his ways.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by B.I.N.G.O. View Post
    The main problem is that the size of the dog park makes it impossible to get to him in time. It's like he's on the lookout for dogs outside the park. That and he's quite evasive and you just end up looking like a right goose when you try to catch him. I understand where' you're coming from with the obedience training. Unfortunately, being a rescued/pound dog, he didn't receive any training at all and now that he's 3 years old, he's quite set in his ways.
    Don't take this the wrong way but

    If you don't have full voice control over your dog then you shouldn't be in a dog park. Read the rules at the front gate, this is paraphrasing but they state, you MUST have control over your dog at all times (ie: you call they come etc), and your dog must not worry, harass or attack another dog or animal.

    You are breaking both of those rules. I would suggest you start going to some group classes or obedience and work on your dogs behaviours before returning to a dog park.

  3. #13
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    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by B.I.N.G.O. View Post
    .... I understand where' you're coming from with the obedience training. Unfortunately, being a rescued/pound dog, he didn't receive any training at all and now that he's 3 years old, he's quite set in his ways.
    Never too old to start learning some basic obedience. That old adage 'you can't teach an old dog new tricks' is a bit of hogwash, really. Probably applies to humans more so than dogs, lol.

    At three, your dog is definitely not too old to enroll in classes, BINGO.

  4. #14
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    Aug 2011
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    I had a dog who bullied other dogs. I never tackled the bullying problem really, but I did do lots and lots of work on recall so at least I could call her back if I thought she was going to make trouble. I agree with K&P that voice control is absolutely crucial.

    And I used to think that once a dog was past a certain age, it was almost futile to try to teach them new things. But I now think it is never too late to start again.

    Where are you located? Our RSPCA in Canberra does a course called 'Recall clinic'. But I think the only other RSPCA that has something similar is the VIC one. Otherwise, call your RSPCA or the local obedience club and ask them for advice.

    I never went to training courses and have been training my rescue dog at home for the past 6 months with pretty good results. Admittedly she was younger (8 months when I got her) but I really don't think it matters much. I started with clicker training and did lots and lots of recall training on walks. I just called her very regularly, gave her a treat when she came and then let her go again. I will still occasionally do it now, even though her recall is pretty good. On those rare occasions where she doesn't come immediately, I will still give her a quiet 'good dog' when she comes back, but no treat.

    The other thing I've had great success with is the 'look at that' (LAT) training. Do a search on the forum or the web and you will find some info on that. I think it could be a very useful tool in teaching your dog not to be reactive to other dogs outside the fence. But it only works if you get into a routine of reward based training. So recall and preferably 5-10 minutes a couple of times a day at home teaching tricks. It just helps in making your dog wanting to please you and they tend to work harder for treats.

    But if you find it hard to get started, a class really is the way to go. I really regret not doing this with my old dog now.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Never too old to start learning some basic obedience. That old adage 'you can't teach an old dog new tricks' is a bit of hogwash, really. Probably applies to humans more so than dogs, lol.

    At three, your dog is definitely not too old to enroll in classes, BINGO.
    Sorry sort of read past that bit.

    Yes as V+F said. Never too old.

    I tell all of my puppy classes, if all they do is socialise for the first year then I am fine with that. Obedience can come later, it is never too late to teach, sit drop stand, come etc.

    Remedial socialisation on the other hand....not so easy.

  6. #16
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    se qld
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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Never too old to start learning some basic obedience. That old adage 'you can't teach an old dog new tricks' is a bit of hogwash, really. Probably applies to humans more so than dogs, lol.

    At three, your dog is definitely not too old to enroll in classes, BINGO.
    So true! It is never too late.

  7. #17
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    BINGO

    He is the way he is because you've been letting him enjoy himself in unacceptable ways since you got him and using the pound thing as an excuse. What K&P said - you're breaking the park rules and probably your state dog laws too by having no control over your dog when he's off lead.

    There is a program you can follow with a rescue dog to set him in your ways and teach acceptable behaviour. Alot of older dogs are in the pound because they were too much for their previous owners to handle and untrained, but as the others have said - it's never too late.

    Susan Garrett sets out a clear program in her book "Ruff Love" and Lesley Nelson has a nice DVD on how to teach any dog a reliable recall. Essentially when you're in a space where you cannot control the environment eg a big dog park - keep your dog on lead every time you are there - for at least a month - so he can't do any of those naughty behaviours. And while you've got him on lead - you can do the LAT training (I think that's from a book called "control unleashed") - reward for turning away from the distraction and putting attention on you.

    It will be annoying and tedious for a month but well worth it in the long run - since your dog is likely to get banned from the dog park by the other users and then the council at the rate you're going. Do something different. Keep your dog on lead until you have a good recall. Practice the recall lots, anywhere and everywhere. Starting at home - at least three times a day, with the best treats you have and no distractions. Add distractions (change rooms, add people and other dogs, go in the back yard) one session at a time. Call only once, if he doesn't come - go get him. And given you're starting somewhere where you have control - you should be able to do that.

    http://www.dogstardaily.com/video-cc.../field_video_0

    http://www.dogstardaily.com/training
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-24-2012 at 03:07 PM.

  8. #18

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    thanks for your posts ...

    We are signing up with a dog training thing at Sutherland i think she will improve with abit more socializing with other dogs in a neutral environment ......

    thanks again for all your help......

  9. #19
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    Jan 2012
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    That is great to hear. Please let us know how it all goes!

  10. #20
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    I think that is a great start.

    Do bear in mind that the fence 'aggression' can be quite separate from general socalisation issues, so you may still need to train your dog out of this behaviour. But ask the trainers about it and they will hopefully have some good tips too.

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