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Thread: penning?? yes or no

  1. #21
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    I think taking your dog to obedience training might also be good to strengthen your bond with her. Because I do know that feeling you get when your dog just seems to make your life hard. You still love them to bits, but you just find it hard to like them because of it. And I always felt guilty when I felt like that because I was sure the dog felt it too.

  2. #22

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    Thanks Nekhbet,

    i don't know if i like the idea of an electric fence i might try something else on the top
    would anyone reccomend those electric dog fencing witht he collar? maybe put that along the fence line?

    she does get 2 walks a day one in the morning for 45 minutes and one in the evening for an hour.
    she kets kong toys and rope dogs and bones during the day but doesn't seem to keep her interest.
    not heard of the bubbles

  3. #23
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    I think all the suggetions you have tried are great and sometimes they don't work....I did notice you mentioned a sandpit..........I had a dog that had to come to my place to re-train or she was to be PTS and lots of money had been spent their garden too.
    A beautiful garden was being wrecked

    We have a huge sand pit here at home...it is like a large veggie bed 12x12 foot and it is about a foot deep.....I have this enclosed in a dog safe yard. We managed this dog by actually encouraging her to dig in this yard. We buried all sort of goodies, both food and toys. And we would run out to the sandpit and start excitedly digging with her. Everytime she dug with us we praised and lavished attention on her. And we did this for about five days in a row about five times a day....She was kept in our kennel Run when she was not in the yard.......After those first five days, we would bury tit bits and toys in the sandpit and bring her in. And leave her to it. I would almost bury her whole dry food breakfast.....we would leave her for a couple of hours and check where she had dug.........Not anywhere out side the pen. She would be happy and giving us the satffy smile when we got there. The idea is to make the sand-pit the most glorious and fabulous place to dig. And for the garden to be boring in comparison

    Her owners made the same large sandpit, it took some convincing, but hubby helped four large sleepers and a truck of soil.......These large sand pits are cool ( near a tree) deep and we use soil, not sand, so lots of fun. This dog went home after two weeks and she digs like mad in her Kennel run with large sandpit and now they even leave the gate open and she has the run of the house and beautiful garden with an open kennel run.

    I also advise more time indoors with the owners, which was a little limited......And when they see her dig over in her pit to go excitedly over to her and tell her how great she is. If you had a treat to treat her. Remember when a dog is doing the right thing you also have to go over and let them know they did right. So many of us just always yell and tell off. And do not reward the good behaviour

    I took the dog home to train at our place, because not many owners are silly and exited enough to make a dogs ultimate dream come true, happy praise and a food reward.....They still have to bury what we call "treasures"........But not as many. They now buy rubber like toys and bury them too. Water bottles and such too. bella has become a non- garden digger, but digs like mad in her own sand-pit....Again money spent

    Just an idea for an extreme dog.........It helps the need to dig and some dogs as was said before find digging self-satisfying and some do it to relieve stress/anxiety.

    It is hard to help without meeting the dog and owner, so we can only assume your real problem and give a suggestion after reading
    Last edited by newfsie; 01-16-2012 at 05:23 PM.
    Pets are forever

  4. #24
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    sandyharley

    I think like the others have said - that some training - starting with better recall ie you see dog digging, you can call her and she will come. Learn how to train that (I like Lesley Nelson's dvd called "really reliable recall") and learn how to do any kind of reward based trick training sometimes called "shaping", or clicker training. The more stuff the dog learns - the more it engages their brain - the better they sleep all day.

    So I walk my dog for around an hour in the morning and again in the evening (if it's not too hot) and on and off - we practice tricks of various sorts. It's fun to put on a quick show for the kiddies at the beach, especially when they're looking a bit tired or grumpy. Sit, Beg, Drop, Roll Over, Talk (louder), Sing, and Dig dig. At least that was this morning's set.

    I find with some of the more obsessive obnoxious behaviours like barking, spinning and digging, it helps to have all those things on command. Frosty - digs when I dig - which means if I need a tree sized hole somewhere - it's great but if I'm planting new stuff out in the back yard, she has to be fully supervised out there until they're established. Mum uses blood and bone in her garden so I have to supervise my dog there too. If the nose goes down where digging not allowed - I stop her (call and distract or collar grab). Once you allow the fun of digging to happen - it's going to be something the dog will try over and over.

    It looks vaguely like your trainer is trying to set up a NILIF program (nothing in life is free and all good things come from you) and maybe trying to limit the digging opportunities. If you can manage this for a whole month - there is a possibility - with consistent handling after - that the digging could stop, but if the dog doesn't have something else to think about - she may just start again.

    For certain holes my dog dug - she was digging for cat poo or mice mostly - besa blocks seemed to work better than dog poo. I used those along the fence line. There is an unfortunate situation that could get ugly depending on what I do - where she does an S or P and then likes to scratch up some of the lawn and sometimes that reveals a "good smell" and she starts digging, but if I pay attention to that it triggers a game of chasey - her fave - so there is a thought in her head, that if she digs in the lawn - I will play chasey with her.

    So I've stopped making it so much fun by waiting to see if a dig starts (the nose goes down), and then just walking to the spot without saying anything just to move her off it without starting a chase-me game (which happens if I run or yell "OI"). So you can see it's a very fine line between stopping the digging and encouraging it.

    I like the advice that V&F and Nekhbet give generally - and I would pm them to ask for a recommendation for a dog trainer in your area with more effective dog and people training skill.

    The fence lid that Nekhbet described - doesn't need to be electrified if your dog doesn't go through it. I'm not sure an electric collar invisible fence combination is going to help you right now. And there is the small possibility it could make things worse.

  5. #25
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    I have known several staffies that are extremely obssessive. One is a shadow or light on the wall chaser and the owners had no luck dealing with it, the dog works itself into an obsessive frenzy.

    I have a friend with a staffy and she has to throw a ball for him twice a day literally untill he drops. She also trains him in obedience and agility which he loves. Strenghtens the bond and exercises his mind, he is slightly mad at agility but he has fun, he does obedience nicely. This seems to keep him out of mischief. The treadmill idea sounds good.

    The sand pit idea sounds like a good one and I would also consider building a nice spacious secure and sheltered run and for times when you cant supervise. You can leave various things in there to help keep the dog occupied although a good session on the treadmill or at the park with a ball just before putting the dog in the run would be a good idea.

    Does your dog come in the house? My dogs enjoy lying around the house when I am there, rather than getting up to mischief shut in the yard.

  6. #26
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    will just throw my 2 cents in....(sorry haven't read all 3 pages of replies).

    I have 2 staffies and unfortunately Staffies dig...they are terriers. I have always said to people....if you want to have a show piece garden...don't get a Staffy

  7. #27
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    I have these beautiful holes in my backyard and Sumo is VERY proud to be helping Daddy with the gardening

  8. #28
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    Join an obedience club and start draining the brain as already suggested they aren't expensive, certainly no where near your trainers prices.

    Obedience training is a great way to tire a dog, some need more than just physical exercise & you get loads of advice from people who actually meet your dogs, talk to people who have had similar problems and meet new friends.

    I can't use any of the interractive food toys here because it would cause problems between the dogs but I have fed entire meals while training.

    I also have my front yard as my good yard and the back yard is the dogs. My dogs do come into the front yard but only when I'm home.

    Your dogs sound like they need more than just a 45 minute walk, they need a brain drain, if you can't get to a club I'd be doing the basics and then looking at some trick training, or building some of my own agility equipment and doing that with them.

    I have an electric fence, they are illegal but with entire dogs/bitches and sheep and goats on the other side of the fence I'm willing to risk it. It's not as though they go around touching it all the time, a couple of zaps and they never did it again. You can get a good pet grade one, I've touched it, it gives you a fright but seriously doubt it would stop anything more than a cat or dog.
    Last edited by MAC; 01-17-2012 at 09:20 AM.

  9. #29
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    Whoever said about the treadmill, brilliant idea, I know there is a company out there marketing towards dogs as I've seen them out at dog shows. I think it's Mitte's??? dogs that walk on the treadmill???

    And I also agree with the person who said they are a breed that can be prone to SA behavior problems.

  10. #30
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    I just bought a big human treadmill as the dogs ones are super expensive ... the only dog that didnt get it was the Dogue de Bordeaux lol Electric I meant as in stock fence type not the e-collar type. I have it at my place and it works, plus you can attach it to the fence. A lot of people have to resort to it and they learn quickly that white tape = no go zone. Don't bother with the collar, it has to sit right and if it gets caught/chewed/broken it wont work. I would rather my dogs think white strung gives them a zap then their collars do.

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