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Thread: Jumping up

  1. #1
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    Default Jumping up

    Banjo is a super good dog most of the time. But we STILL have a problem with her jumping up on people. She has gotten a bit better - she used to go completely nuts when we just got her. She barely ever jumps up on us anymore, nor on our regular visitors (like the neighbour across the road and her daughter who comes over for playdates often). I can usually prevent her from jumping up on random people we meet when we are out walking now. But she still catches me by suprise sometimes with a quick jump when I think she is just passing them. And visitors to our house are fair game, as well as when we go visiting people.

    I have not been dealing with the problem very well lately. I tend to yell, which I know is a total no-no but I sometimes just react impulsively and there is that need to be seen to respond by other people.

    So I need to start again in a more constructive manner. I will start the front door training as soon as I have been able to find a willing victim to practice with - not easy. But I get that bit. It's those first 10-15 mins after the guests have arrived (or we at their house) that I need to find a better strategy for. I have not trained her to go to her place - and I am not overly motivated about that one right now. Asking her to sit or drop doesn't work when she gets so overexited. But I have had great results with LAT and I was wondering if I can adapt that to these situations or even just use it as I do in other situations? I do not want to give her the message that she cannot greet people though, so that's where the confusion lies.

    I don't know if that made any sense to anyone else but me!

  2. #2

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    Management is the first step. As in stop Banjo from accessing the visitors straight away, wait for her to have calmed down then let her greet them. When she does greet them, ask your visitors to ignore her until she is not jumping on them. If she is persistently jumping I would also be utilizing time out with her (use a no reward marker like "Too Bad" then put her in small boring place such as a crate, toilet room, laundry, closet etc for 2 minutes or until she is quiet).

    I would also be working on things like you and your children not greeting Banjo as soon as you get home, wait for her to have calmed down and then greet her.

    On walks I would be asking for a sit or drop and then reward her for staying in that position while people pass and then work up to walking past people at a distance.

  3. #3
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    I cannot ask people to ignore her when she jumps, tried that but she is too full on. And the problem is that she changes from calm to wild so quickly. I really would like to find a method that utilises rewards - other than attention - for the right behaviour.

    I did the not greeting when we came home for the first months we had her, but now I cannot resist (because I am always so happy to see her) and she doesn't jump up on us. I just make sure I greet her very calmly and she is fine.

    On walks I do often use the LAT and that actually works well. And I do not want her to walk up to greet every stranger we meet on walks so that's ok. I have done this consistently with kids we meet and she is now great with them.

    ETA: This was one of those stupid posts of mine that were a result of me needing to think aloud! I should maybe just try introducing a cue that is similar to LAT that means 'calm, 4 feet on the ground' and reward her with treats as long as she does it. I have also tried getting friends to come in and go out again as soon as she starts jumping - this method worked wonders when my daughter and I implemented it - but none of my friends have enough patience unfortunately. That is my biggest hurdle. I cannot count on 'the victims' to help me with this issue. Some will even reward her by patting her when she jumps, some use the knee in the chest trick, some just get annoyed with her or with me... But I don't want to not let her near other people because then there will just not be an opportunity to teach her!
    Last edited by Beloz; 01-11-2012 at 12:38 PM.

  4. #4

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    Totally get it, the thinking aloud that is. I thought I would chuck some ideas around for you.

    It is hard to have people ignore larger breed dogs when they jump up.

    With using a cue as you suggested, start off with people she doesn't really jump up on ie: get your kids to walk in the door, give her the cue, then reward her for being calm. Then progress to harder people slowly.

  5. #5
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    Default

    My dog isn't very big but she is so "dense". Might be the staffy genes. She has a very solid chest.

    I also urgently have to cut her nails. I've been putting it off because I've never done it before. My old dog's nails never seemed to get too long. That may help in being able to get others' cooperation on the ignoring her when she jumps.

    I'll practice on my daughter and the neighbours. Then I'll order lots of take-away and practice on the delivery guys.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    My dog isn't very big but she is so "dense". Might be the staffy genes. She has a very solid chest.

    I also urgently have to cut her nails. I've been putting it off because I've never done it before. My old dog's nails never seemed to get too long. That may help in being able to get others' cooperation on the ignoring her when she jumps.

    I'll practice on my daughter and the neighbours. Then I'll order lots of take-away and practice on the delivery guys.
    ROFL sure the delivery guys will love that!

  7. #7
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    Default

    In past post it sounds like she is OK on lead, so i would have a lead nearby at all times and put her on lead as soon as someone rings the doorbell or if you see them and do some of your usual Obedience routines like just "sit/drop/stay" and reward...the reward could even be a pet form the new person. I totally agree with the ignore, but if that is not possible, the on lead might work better. It is tedious, but sometimes the tedious works.
    Our dogs know that if they are too exited they go to "time-out" and they hate it.....place is the best though, but does need your time to teach.
    Pets are forever

  8. #8
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    She's kind of worse on the lead when she gets overexited! She sometimes almost does somersaults when she jumps when on leash and it seems to egg her on more than anything else.

    And I tried asking guests to only pat her when she's calm, but she has a habit of jumping straight up from a sit with minimal warning and head butting people, so they're not keen after trying once! Ideally, if I could get all our guests to do what we did to make her stop jumping up on us, she would get the message that it's not just us being boring and everyone else is fun. But the times I tried to get someone else to work with us on this, they just weren't consistent and/or patient enough.

    I suppose I haven't tried time out in a consistent manner in this situation. It may work. But because of the overwhelming success I've had with her with LAT in situations where she used to get totally out of control before, I think I might get faster results if I consistently use a treat based method? Especially as I don't treat her as often now for other every day behaviours. But if that doesn't work I will attempt the time out method.

    But the keyword here really is consistency, a fact that is only really sinking in now I am writing about this and considering your suggestions. I just have been all over the place with this which totally explains why she still doesn't 'get it' while I know she is pretty clever.

    Sorry about the confused rant! Thanks for listening to my internal conversation and for your advice. I promise I will tackle the issue seriously now and report back!

  9. #9
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    I think it often helps when you write things down....it is why I write up plans for my Students.........I don't show them to the Students, I just write the plan. It finds all the holes. I check them a couple of times and go S*** I forgot that bit or so forth...I find that is the problem on here, you post quickly and look back and go Oops, that makes no sense or is too convoluted, or I got that wrong, because suddenly someone adds some info.
    That is why I like to meet a dog at home in his own surroundings and later at a place with many dogs/people........That gives you a good idea of what they are like.

    Consistency is really the mainstay of dog training....They are really very clever and figure us out pretty quick and can find all the weak spots. You can do all the training in one weak moment.
    Pets are forever

  10. #10
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    I am lucky because Banjo is so well balanced and has been very forgiving when I make mistakes.

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