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Thread: Jumping up

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    Yes, you can always change your mind.

    The trick to the spray is you're not actually pouring the water on them and it's quite quick with a little spray bottle. If she is afraid of this then it would definitely be a quick fix. In My Opinion, it would only damage her trust in you if there was no way for her to avoid the water, leading to helplessness. I think she would learn quite fast to sit in front of people with a treat if she new the consequence. Also, you can spray her and hide the bottle behind your back. She wouldn't even know where it came from, haha.

    See, the thing is, you need to make it quite clear to the dog what reward they get for the desired behaviour and what punishment they get for the undesired behaviour. The greater the contrast, the faster they learn.

    I hope the time outs work for you, but from my experience, it can take dogs a little while to join the dots (if they do at all) and I'm pretty sure that in the wild the older dogs don't send the pups for a time out when they jump on the other dogs, they give them a quick nip and tell them that's enough. The dogs get it and move on, no grudges held.

    Good Luck with your training I can't wait for your update in the future.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
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    3,784

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Well, and I thought my dog was bad when she jumped up. But today someone arrived at the swimming spot with a 7mo newfie. Massive of course. She let him off the lead and the first thing he did was gallop over to me and jump up to give me a kiss! I have bad arthritis and any fall would be much more serious for me than most people so I was actually quite terrified. I felt for his owner as her problem is much worse than mine and I know how hard it can be to control this.
    That is a huge problem in the making......I have never allowed my newfies to jump up as puppies for that reason. Quite scary to get with the Rescues we get. We have just got Lukey out of it. Funnily enough by teaching him to Jump up on command. I thought if it worked with barking lets give jumping a go...........he was too timid to tell off or even turn away, he was devastated when you ignored him and set him back every time. So we asked him to jump and asked him for a down. And rewarded the down. Also taught him to sit, which he didn't know and to drop and our famous place.....All heavily rewarded. He is good now 68kg jumping is not good. I would never have check-chained him or sprayed him. So it was slow and several different ways
    Pets are forever

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    That is a huge problem in the making......I have never allowed my newfies to jump up as puppies for that reason. Quite scary to get with the Rescues we get. We have just got Lukey out of it. Funnily enough by teaching him to Jump up on command. I thought if it worked with barking lets give jumping a go...........he was too timid to tell off or even turn away, he was devastated when you ignored him and set him back every time. So we asked him to jump and asked him for a down. And rewarded the down. Also taught him to sit, which he didn't know and to drop and our famous place.....All heavily rewarded. He is good now 68kg jumping is not good. I would never have check-chained him or sprayed him. So it was slow and several different ways
    I'm glad you taught Lukey to jump on command and then rewarded for getting down. I don't allow even the smallest of dogs to jump, as the same rules should apply to each member of the pack. Every dog is different and should be treated as such in removing unwanted behaviours. Some training works for some dogs and other training works for other dogs. You just have to try diffirent things and work out what works for each dog.

    I always start with positive reinforcement and negative punishment, but it soon becomes clear with each case whether or not that alone will work. Sometimes you just need positive punishment. I always follow the LIMA principle (Least Invasive, Minimally Aversive). If time outs and ignoring them works, then great. If it doesn't, then you go to the next step, until successful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
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    Had to sleep on this and have another social situation in which Banjo got out of control with the jumping. Maybe you do have a point. My method is just going too slowly and it is just so hard to not let her self-reward in the meantime. I might trial the spray bottle when we get back from the coast.

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