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Thread: Jumping up

  1. #11
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    Dogs are very forgiving.....it is one of the things I find so special about them
    Pets are forever

  2. #12
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    Remember as a kid, you'd shuffle your feet on a carpet and then touch your sibling and give them an electric shock?
    try the same on your dog.

    cheap e training, for when you cant afford a ecollar lol

  3. #13
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    I've been doing "Who's that?" with her to prevent her from getting over-exited around people. It works. She'll calm right down and pretty much lose interest in whoever she wanted to go bowl over. But it really makes me question why she has this urge to greet total strangers with such enthusiasm. I suspect it has its roots in her early socialisation, but I'll never know. And of course this is better than her being fearful or aggressive towards people! But it still isn't an easy one to deal with sometimes.

    Unrelated, but I also have noticed she feels very threatened if you raise a stick. Not if you just raise it to throw it. She seems to be able to differentiate between that and what looks like raising a stick to hit. I first noticed when first me and then my daughter used a tool with a handle to gently push her out of the way when she was too slow to move. She reacted quite fearful and made us feel really quilty. And when my daughter and her friend carried around big sticks on our walk the other day, the dog got skittish when she had to stay near them to wait to cross the road - even though I had made sure the girls didn't raise the sticks when near the dog. I noticed the dog was still a tad reluctant to come near my daughter the day after!

    It's not a huge issue and easily managed. But not knowing her early past, I'll be forever wondering if she was abused by someone as a pup, or maybe it was someone she met when she was roaming before she got picked up by the pound, or maybe she just once got a fright when someone threw a stick at her accidentally. I'll never know.

  4. #14
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    Well, and I thought my dog was bad when she jumped up. But today someone arrived at the swimming spot with a 7mo newfie. Massive of course. She let him off the lead and the first thing he did was gallop over to me and jump up to give me a kiss! I have bad arthritis and any fall would be much more serious for me than most people so I was actually quite terrified. I felt for his owner as her problem is much worse than mine and I know how hard it can be to control this.

  5. #15
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    Thought I'd update as I am very slowly finally getting somewhere. The LAT method works when we're out walking. She will now look at me for a reward when she spots people in our path instead of trying to get to them for an exuberant greeting. I'll continue with that for a while longer and am pretty confident that she will eventually lose interest in wanting to go greet total strangers. It worked when I did this with small children whom she now ignores.

    It doesn't work at home though. So I did start using time-out. Actually did it for the first time yesterday because I had a visitor who was willing to participate. I only put her in the laundry for about 30 secs at a time as I wanted to get as many repeats in as I could during my friend's short visit. Only took about 4 times before I saw her go back to my friend after I opened the laundry door, start to jump up, then change her mind mid-jump. She got lots of praise for that little hop. I love it when you can see a dog trying to practice self-control.

    The mouthing is still an issue too with other people. She doesn't seem to respond to the 'gentle' cue with others. I didn't want to confuse her too much by tackling that one yesterday and wasn't sure if I should start using time out for that too?

  6. #16
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    Mouthing can be an issue, generally from puppyhood. They weren't "punished" for mouthing so instead this became a "reward". The best thing to do would be to play with Banjo. The moment she mouths you hand, use a word such as 'no' or something you already use as a negative and get up and walk away. Ending the play is a negative for her, so he will begin to understand that whenever she mouths you or anyone else the play time will end and she will begin to do it less and less.

    In regards to jumping at visitors, I would be putting her on a correction chain and correcting her each time she jumps. Visitors can also have treats, so if she goes up to them and sits in front of them, she will be rewarded. You can also have a "guest waiting spot", such as on her bed. Whenever there's a knock at the door, she must go to that spot and wait to be released.
    These things combined will have a quick effect on her behaviour. She understands the immediate correction for jumping, the immediate reward for sitting and the reward that follows if she stays in her "waiting spot". If it is working correctly you will see her run to her spot when there is a knock and eagerly wait for the command to be released.

  7. #17
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    Beloz, can you enlighten me what the LAT method is please?

  8. #18
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    LAT = Look at that. I started doing it with small kids (she was a shocker for bowling them over when I just got her!) and with the clicker. When there is someone/something I don't want her to go to, I say 'look at that' and click/reward when she looks at me. The idea is actually that she looks at whatever the distraction is, so she knows that that is what she is not allowed to act on. Most of the times Banjo will look at the child/person and then look back at me for a reward. It's quite cute to watch and she loves to hear me say those words. Naturally, because she gets a lot of treats that way. But as I said, it's not too hard to wean her off the treats after enough repetitions as she gets to anticipate who/what I don't want her to run up to. I'm not too strict about her having to look at the target though. If she starts losing interest, I might repeat a couple more times and then release her.

    And Pawfection, I don't think I would trust myself with a correction chain. I've never used one, so have no idea how to use them. I also find it hard to get the timing right with the jumping, because she can get so very exuberant. She can actually headbutt someone from a sit position without any clear warning!

    And the mouthing (or jumping) with me or my daughter is not a problem anymore. She does respond to the 'gentle' cue or even just ignoring her makes her go from mouthing to licking. But it is so much harder to enforce this with other people.

    I think I will continue with just getting her to stay with her 4 feet on the ground around visitors and then start working on the mouthing and possibly asking her to sit or go to her place.

  9. #19
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    I have also used a spray bottle for unwanted behaviour, in place of a chain. You could try that, as long as you aimed at tie dog and not your visitor :P it's a bit of a hit and miss with which dogs will respond and which will ignore being sprayed. Even dogs who love to play in the water have hated the spray in the head. It's actually quite funny to some people and doesn't harm the dog, so it's quite a good punishment for those worried about hurting their dog.

  10. #20
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    Thanks for the suggestions, but unfortunately water would be even worse to use on my dog than most other correction. For some reason she is terrified of having water poured on her. I even tried with a small cup and she ran off and went to hide under the house for an hour. I believe that correction would probably be a quicker fix, but I don't want to risk damaging her trust in me.

    This is only the second dog I am training and I have never been to any classes, so I think the safest thing to do is to just stick to the rewards and time-out for now. If it doesn't work at all, I can still change my mind.

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