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Thread: Argh! Snappy Alvin!!! :-(

  1. #1

    Default Argh! Snappy Alvin!!! :-(

    I took Alvin to the vet today....he has a lump :-( they are not sure what it is yet, keeping an eye on it.... anyway while we were there a great big puppy labrador (full size but obviously still a baby) bounded too close and Alvin went NUTS he was very vicious....and angry. I was very surprised as he has never reacted this way to other dogs, he has shown interest , went to puppy school and was okay with dogs...usually was just to freindly and big and pushy.... while walking a few weeks back he saw some poodle and when they got close he laid down on the ground (not submissvely) with is paws out in front and watched intently but we wernt close enough for him to worry about them....hes gone up to dog on walks and sniffed them all no issues before....

    Anyway it really scared me how vicious he sounded, there were MANY dogs in the vets and cats...he seemed overwhelmed by everything going on....he was hard to get his attention, kept snapping his head around when he saw stuff out of hte corner of his eye, after his initial snap he kept an eye on the labrador but he laid down on the ground and at times seemed disinterested...but was quite focused on this dog at times....

    I am booking him straight in with a dog trainer, i did it at the vet, im not having that it made me scared for the kids in the vets too.... I got worried he might snap at them too!!! because he looks like a pit bull I dont want him using those behaviours or being scary....

    Anyway i know your all very knowledgeable so im just telling you so you can all give me opinions on what you think about this scenario. Alvin was boarded in a vet surgery when eh was found loose and stayed there for a few weeks until i rescued him.... we have only had him 3 months so this was his only visit to the vet since then as when we picked him up he had all his shots etc....and hadnt been sick untill now....so he hasnt been to a vets since then.
    Help Alvin and Barkly Save dogs from death row :-) Please take a moment to go and vote for them here http://www.pawclub.com.au/Promotions...ote.aspx?id=14 So they can win and donate some much needed funds to Big Dog Rescue. THANKS AND WOOF!!

  2. #2

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    Sorry for my atrocious spelling and English, I'm actually quite literate, hahaha!! I just typed this fast as I'm meant to be cooking dinner and doing other stuff !! LOL
    Help Alvin and Barkly Save dogs from death row :-) Please take a moment to go and vote for them here http://www.pawclub.com.au/Promotions...ote.aspx?id=14 So they can win and donate some much needed funds to Big Dog Rescue. THANKS AND WOOF!!

  3. #3

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    Um so a rude dog bounded up to your dog, got into your dogs personally space and you think YOUR dog did something wrong?

    Please read this article
    Flying Dog Press - Suzanne Clothier - He Just Wants To Say "Hi!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

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    I like what K&P posted........

    You are going to have to be very careful that you do not become anxious and start off lead aggression. it is s easy for handlers to become tense and send this down the lead.....Try to read your dog and do something like distract him before anything happens. that is why i love clicker training

    I also think that we often blame dogs for aggression when it is other dogs that cause the aggression/reaction. Young dogs, especially labradors that have not been correctly socialised, can be very impolite and cause these episodes in older dogs. It is why I take tessa to puppy classes, because she teaches very young puppies how to be more polite, but she has very good bite inhibition.

    I have attached a poster, hope it is large enough to see. I am not saying it pertains so much to your dog, but it is probably how the labrador is........."my dog is friendly"........Having retrained a very dog aggressive dog, these dogs were my nightmare

    dogs in need of space.jpg
    Last edited by newfsie; 01-10-2012 at 09:42 PM.
    Pets are forever

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Logan, Brisbane QLD
    Posts
    806

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    I agree, Lab sounds like it's still a pup and hasn't learnt it's manners yet and combined with the fact that your dog was probably overwhelmed sitting inside the vet with all the hustle and bustle & possibly previous memories of being there, caused it to over react. I wouldn't worry about it if he's normally fine with other dogs. You also have to accept the fact that not all dogs like each other, just like people.

  6. #6

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    thanks guys..... really appreciate the words.... i am going to keep an eye on it and still take him to do some more training as well....
    Help Alvin and Barkly Save dogs from death row :-) Please take a moment to go and vote for them here http://www.pawclub.com.au/Promotions...ote.aspx?id=14 So they can win and donate some much needed funds to Big Dog Rescue. THANKS AND WOOF!!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Um so a rude dog bounded up to your dog, got into your dogs personally space and you think YOUR dog did something wrong?

    Please read this article
    Flying Dog Press - Suzanne Clothier - He Just Wants To Say "Hi!"
    thanks I will have a read, i guess im ultra careful because he looks like a pitbull like i was saying..when i went in the vet, people were saying (in their nicest fake cute voice) ohhh look at him what a monster, i bet no-one will break into your house! Then he goes and snaps like that and people start taking their cats out of the room and I go arggh.....!!
    Help Alvin and Barkly Save dogs from death row :-) Please take a moment to go and vote for them here http://www.pawclub.com.au/Promotions...ote.aspx?id=14 So they can win and donate some much needed funds to Big Dog Rescue. THANKS AND WOOF!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

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    Oh and by the way....general training with a good trainer is always great..........So you go for it and enjoy, it can become addictive
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
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    I wouldn't worry too much about it either. Dogs do have a right to defend their personal space. But it will definitely not hurt to continue with his socialisation. Ideally that would mean lots of good experiences with nice, polite dogs. In the end you may always have little control over how he reacts to dogs without manners who don't get the message. I also agree with newfsie that it is important that you don't get anxious about him meeting other dogs because your dog will definitely sense this.

    Newfsie, I really like that poster. But also because I've met plenty of dog owners who didn't want their dogs to socialise with mine when they were off leash who did not give me any cues. I once had a guy throw a brick at my old dog because she approached his off leash dog!!! Never even looked at me. While I would always call my dog off if someone asked me.

    But I never let my off leash dog go up to a dog on lead. In rare cases I will ask the owner if she can say hi, but usually I just keep my dog away and leave it at that. If they're both on the lead, I will sometimes ask, but my dog is hard to control on the lead if she wants to play, so I prefer to just leave it.

  10. #10

    Default

    I also have to stress what Newfsie has said. You really need to work on not becoming anxious/stressed/tense when other dogs approach yours.

    Here are a few more article on how WE create leash aggression inadvertently and how to counteract it.
    Flying Dog Press - Suzanne Clothier - Handling On-lead Aggression
    This one read it right the way through and then re-read it again
    Flying Dog Press - Suzanne Clothier - AGGRESSION: A Case History with Harry T

    I can understand why you are cautious my dog is a Pitbull, so I understand the responsibility that comes with having a dog that people have such misconceptions about, the best thing we can do for them is to make sure we understand what is socially acceptable (in the Dog world) and what is not. What your dog did WAS socially acceptable and was probably proceeded by warnings to the other dog before it progressed to a snap, what the Lab did WAS NOT socially acceptable and it is likely that your dog gave it a lesson in manners.

    I also agree that general training is always healthy and should be continued whether you have a perfect dog or not.

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