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Thread: Training a puppy

  1. #1

    Default Training a puppy

    Hi,

    I just wanted to check in and ask a question about my 9 week old puppy. I think his behaviour is normal as he is an exitable and hungry puppy...

    He is learning sit and drop. Does the actions for me when i have his attention and he isnt starving hungry, in a room with minimal distractions, im also working on these commands outside, but cannot leave the backyard yet. He does not do them with the same level of follow through with my hubby....i also think this is normal.

    I know its good manners ro teach puppy to wait for his dinner, but he sees it and wont listen to me...is it ok to work on that when he is a few weeks older? Or should i be doing it from the start?

    I guess im wanting to know how much you can chalk up to being a baby, and how much you should persevere as puppy needs to learn.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Default

    There are some great books for new puppy owners...........These are free, Just remember he is only 9 weeks old.

    If he keeps jumping up to get to the food, just ignore and stay calm and wait until the first moment he is calm, say "yes"/click and give him his food. You can do this just with little treats to get started, so that he knows what you mean. Ian Dunbar actually explains this


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  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

    Default

    I just taught my puppy to sit, tell her to stay and won't put the food down till she isn't moving. then she is allowed to have it. I got my puppy at 5 weeks old and i think you should just keep at it.

    Trust me she will get there.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Clare, South Australia
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    32

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    How old should they be when you start puppy training? & the obedience training with clubs?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

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    They have puppy classes right from the age of 8 weeks old. There are good and bad ones out there and you DON'T want to find a bad one.

    It's great to start training your puppy from day dot. Obviously you don't want to be too hard on them in the beginning as this can sometimes effect their confidence.

    I got a foster pup at 4 months old. She had no obedience whatsoever. I started with her bowl of food in the air just above her nose and slowly brought the food to the ground. Initially my aim was to get the bowl just above the ground before she could eat. If she jumped up to try and eat I would lift it again and again until I got just above the ground and then placed it on the ground as she was eating. I shaped this, slowly making her wait longer. One side of the bowl was touching the ground, but if it didn't make it before she got up I'd lift it again. Then holding it at the ground for 2 seconds before letting go of it, then waiting until it was on the ground completely. If she ever got up, I'd say "ah ah" and lift it, so she naturally began to stop herself eating it when I made thy noise. This helped with when it was on the ground and she had to wait a few seconds. I use the word "free" for when she leave her sit and eat. Then I started to slowly stand up, etc.

    Now I just put her food in her bowl, put it in on the ground, stand up and watch her intense focus on me, waiting to be released. She's a great little dog.

    Sadly, she is going to her forever home on Monday and I will no longer see this

  7. #7

    Default

    I use/teach pretty much the same method as Belinda except I aim to put the bowl down first time (ie: if the dog moves forward before the bowl is on the ground I lift the bowl up, wait for a sit and then move it towards the ground again, rinse and repeat until the dog is waiting until the bowl is set down). Most pups actually pick this exercise up surprisingly fast (under 5 - 10 minutes).

  8. #8

    Default

    I use the triangle of temptation to train stays at meal times, as it is designed to help the dog think through frustration.

    Dog Training Article - Triangle of Temptation - K9 Pro

    Start training your pup from the day you bring it home - I don't focus so much on teaching lots of different commands but teaching the puppy general manners (i.e. how to walk nicely on the leash etc), teaching them how their life is going to be (i.e. crate training, how to behave in the house), and most importantly teaching them all rewards come from me and how to play a game with me and earn rewards, building focus and drive etc.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smeagle View Post
    I use the triangle of temptation to train stays at meal times, as it is designed to help the dog think through frustration.

    Dog Training Article - Triangle of Temptation - K9 Pro

    Start training your pup from the day you bring it home - I don't focus so much on teaching lots of different commands but teaching the puppy general manners (i.e. how to walk nicely on the leash etc), teaching them how their life is going to be (i.e. crate training, how to behave in the house), and most importantly teaching them all rewards come from me and how to play a game with me and earn rewards, building focus and drive etc.
    Just on this. I think the most important thing you can do with a puppy is to reward it for good/desirable behaviour when it hasn't been asked for it. So if your pup is sitting/laying quietly then reward it.
    Too many people focus on getting dogs to follow "commands" (I hate that word so will use "cue" from now on instead) that all they teach the dog is to behave like an idiot until a "cue" is given. Lots of dogs learn behaviour chains that involve being silly to get you to give them a cue to get a reward. **A good example is a dog that barks at another dog in class, owner calls dogs name, dog looks, owner rewards the attention but then doesn't keep rewarding, dog goes back to barking at another dog, owner calls dogs name, dog looks, owner rewards attention......the dog will keep barking to get the owner to call it to get the reward. **
    If you reward for the dog just behaving then you are teaching your dog to behave in the absence of a command.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Just on this. I think the most important thing you can do with a puppy is to reward it for good/desirable behaviour when it hasn't been asked for it. So if your pup is sitting/laying quietly then reward it.
    Too many people focus on getting dogs to follow "commands" (I hate that word so will use "cue" from now on instead) that all they teach the dog is to behave like an idiot until a "cue" is given. Lots of dogs learn behaviour chains that involve being silly to get you to give them a cue to get a reward. **A good example is a dog that barks at another dog in class, owner calls dogs name, dog looks, owner rewards the attention but then doesn't keep rewarding, dog goes back to barking at another dog, owner calls dogs name, dog looks, owner rewards attention......the dog will keep barking to get the owner to call it to get the reward. **
    If you reward for the dog just behaving then you are teaching your dog to behave in the absence of a command.
    I definitely think a lot of people focus too much on teaching their puppies lots of different commands rather than teaching them appropriate behaviour and end up with a puppy who can't behave in the house, walk on a loose leash, have basic manners or behave outside of training etc - having said that, I don't want to reward a puppy for being calm all the time. When I bring my pup home (later this year all going to plan) she'll be taught how to behave in the house, when it is time to be calm and 'off' but she'll also learn how to play a game with me and when we're training, calm behaviour will not win her my rewards. When I give the trigger command she can go as crazy as she likes, I will only be rewarding her when she's showing lots of drive and high arousal.
    Last edited by Bec; 01-25-2012 at 10:30 AM.

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