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Thread: My Dog's Dominance is Getting Worse

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I don't think much of the alpha dog theory either, but I do make sure my dog knows that I control all the resources. Food, toys, access to walks, etc. (I also have no problem telling my child that the main reason why I make all the decisions is because I have all the money and without me she doesn't get to eat or do anything!)

    I also think swapping for a high value treat would be a good start. If you teach your dog that 'sharing' his toys with you always has pleasant consequences, he'll get the hang of it pretty soon.
    LMAO that made me laugh as I tell my kids that all the time!

    Oncebitten -
    I have never had a dog myself with guarding issues but I have seen a dog with it. We have always taught from a young age that food, toys etc you get when i say you get. One of the first things I religiously teach my dogs is to "leave it" where you hold food right near their nose and they don't touch it untill you say.

    I would agree with the high value treat or making sure you have two of everything so that You can trade the ball you have for the ball he has.

    Teach him to sit and stay, so that you can get him to now want the ball you have, move away from the original ball where he then sits and stays while you pick it up. Treat him with a snack or a throw of the ball.

    Continue that till he realises its more fun to give you the ball back cause the game keeps going.

    Goodluck
    Last edited by Bulldog_Lover; 10-16-2011 at 08:45 PM.
    Rubylisious


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I don't think much of the alpha dog theory either, but I do make sure my dog knows that I control all the resources. Food, toys, access to walks, etc. (I also have no problem telling my child that the main reason why I make all the decisions is because I have all the money and without me she doesn't get to eat or do anything!)

    I also think swapping for a high value treat would be a good start. If you teach your dog that 'sharing' his toys with you always has pleasant consequences, he'll get the hang of it pretty soon.
    LOL, I totally relate to that too, I do the same as well.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I don't think much of the alpha dog theory either, but I do make sure my dog knows that I control all the resources. Food, toys, access to walks, etc. (I also have no problem telling my child that the main reason why I make all the decisions is because I have all the money and without me she doesn't get to eat or do anything!)

    I also think swapping for a high value treat would be a good start. If you teach your dog that 'sharing' his toys with you always has pleasant consequences, he'll get the hang of it pretty soon.

    That's right whereas we(I!) tend to leave his toys lying around. I should be collecting them up and storing away each time I suppose so he values them more.
    High value treats...see I'm not even sensitive to his hierarchy of likes and dislikes. When it comes to food he devours everything pretty quickly.

    "pleasant consequences"...nice way of putting it!
    Much appreciated Beloz!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oskar's mum View Post
    Does he growl around dinner time too, if you go near him while eating? When i first bought Oskar home, I tried to take his pigs ear off him, he growled and nipped me. I won't tolerate that behaviour in my home, so I tried a few more times and he got the message, I would say Ta and gently take it off him. I put my hand in his food, and I also make him wait until dinner. I encourage my children to do so to. You as his owner, must show him who is boss, and you don't need to smack him or anything. I would never dream of doing that. I have also discouraged the possessive behaviour in any other dog I have had.

    I agree with everyone else as well if you are unsure what to do, get professional help.
    Yes he growls if we want to move his food. We can go near him but if our hand goes near his food he growls.
    I wish we'd known this when he was a puppy because I don't feel confident enough now to attempt to change his behaviour on this one. Bones in the park too. I can't put my hand anywhere near him head. Often I have to go home early from the park because he's got a bone in his mouth and lost interest in everything else.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oskar's mum View Post
    Does he growl around dinner time too, if you go near him while eating? When i first bought Oskar home, I tried to take his pigs ear off him, he growled and nipped me. I won't tolerate that behaviour in my home, so I tried a few more times and he got the message, I would say Ta and gently take it off him. I put my hand in his food, and I also make him wait until dinner. I encourage my children to do so to. You as his owner, must show him who is boss, and you don't need to smack him or anything. I would never dream of doing that. I have also discouraged the possessive behaviour in any other dog I have had.

    I agree with everyone else as well if you are unsure what to do, get professional help.
    Yes he growls if we want to move his food. We can go near him but if our hand goes near his food he growls.
    I wish we'd known this when he was a puppy because I don't feel confident enough now to attempt to change his behaviour on this one. Bones in the park too. I can't put my hand anywhere near him head. Often I have to go home early from the park because he's got a bone in his mouth and lost interest in everything else.
    Thank you Oskars Mum!

  6. #16
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    Thanks Hyacinth for another monster post. Plenty of food for thought there.(I'll need to reread it a few times!) And I can tell you really know what you are talking about. eg. not punishing a dog for protecting his resources.
    I use lots of food rewards but I need to get more sophisticated in my timing and sensitivity to his preferences of treats.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    I taught my dog from when he was a puppy that he had to let people take things off him, no matter what it was or who it was. I started out using tug of war with a rope and teaching him in the middle of the game to "leave it". Once he had that worked out i moved to food/bones etc. I have had other people take bones off him with no signs of aggression - sometimes he'll play tug until he's told to leave it but never growls or anything. I'm not sure if this is usefull to you, but maybe its a starting place?
    yeah we didnt get that far in obedience school.
    Some good ideas there.
    If I'd only known when he was a puppy!
    Thanks Mymatejack.

  8. #18
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    You're welcome, I don't have any professional expertise, just advice from personal experience. I still believe you can change his behaviour, personally I think it's just as easy to teach an older dog new tricks (pardon the pun) as it is to teach a new pup. It's just practise.

  9. #19
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    oncebitten

    This is not good.

    But you don't have to force him. Get him to volunteer. Ie do make him do a short stay before you put his dinner down, start short like a couple of seconds and each day make him wait a couple more seconds.

    After he has started dinner, say his name and offer him another really yummy treat. Don't take his dinner away. Just distract him with the new offering for a second or two and then let him finish his dinner.

    Or you could spoon feed him all his dinner. He gets each mouthfull from you and you never put his bowl down until the resource guarding is no longer happening.

    You might want to consider getting a book called "ruff love" by Susan Garrett. And read her blog. The book outlines step by step how to train a puppy or an adult rescue to be a great family pet in your home.

    I think a few things have changed since she wrote the book - ie she doesn't do time outs for dogs any more. But essentially it is a detailed outline of "nothing in life is free" and "relationship building" with your dog. So your dog will do what you tell it when you tell it and have joy doing it.

    Susan Garrett Agility Training

    Ruff Love

  10. #20
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    Already started hand-feeding him instead of using his feed bowl.

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