Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Training Aggression

  1. #1

    Default Training Aggression

    Our dog Chopper (Jack Russell x Maltese) has recently begun showing signs of aggression when males are concerned. Seems to be mostly if i'm cooking and my husband comes near me he growls and gets 'nasty'.

    I know that this might be that he thinks he's alpha male, but i'm not sure why this is only happening now considering Chopper is 5 yrs old.

    We don't feed him before us and we make him go and wait on his bed whilst we eat. We don't feed him human food, and I'm not really sure how to combat this problem

    Any feedback or advice would be welcomed.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    What exactly do you do when he growls at you?

    Where is he when you're "cooking"?

    What does your husband do?

    Seems like you're into a lot of Cesar Milan stuff eg calling him an "alpha male" and not feeding him first etc. Cesar does too much punishment and not enough reward in my opinion and all his stuff about alpha dogs and dominance has been debunked - years ago. Wolves don't do it and dogs don't either. Dogs are opportunists and they will try anything that works. And it's up to you to set boundaries and limit opportunities you don't want them taking.

    I would suggest that maybe Hubby hand feeds him for a bit ie all his dinner comes from hubby one piece at a time. And I suggest you put him somewhere he can't "guard" you in the kitchen ie put him on a mat that is outside the traffic area and train him to stay there with lots of rewards. Also make him sit on the mat while you get his dinner ready and while hubby feeds him, and if he stops growling at hubby, then you can put the dinner down, get him to stay for a few seconds to a minute (show some self control), and then give him permission to eat.

    For some reason he has decided that hubby is bad and interfers with him getting good things. Hubby needs to become the source of good things (and not punishment) for this dog. Jack Russells and Maltese both have a reputation for being snappy if you allow it and don't train them to do something else.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 10-11-2011 at 09:23 PM. Reason: fix some crap english and clarify butter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    I think if it has advanced this far (aggression), it might be a good idea to get someone in to see what is happening. Are there any local Dog trainers/behaviourist to chat to and to see what your dogs is doing.
    A couple of questions.....is your dog neutered?
    And do you pick your little dog up at all........As a stop gap, I would stop picking him up at all. And maybe not show too much affection, unless he has worked for it. Basically the "nothing in life is for free system " would help too. And like Hya said, get some of the food to come from hubby
    But seriously, without being able to see the dog in his own surroundings and how he deals with people it is hard to help. So maybe you can find someone to help you.
    Good luck
    Pets are forever

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    What exactly do you do when he growls at you?

    Where is he when you're "cooking"?

    What does your husband do?

    Seems like you're into a lot of Cesar Milan stuff eg calling him an "alpha male" and not feeding him first etc. Cesar does too much punishment and not enough reward in my opinion and all his stuff about alpha dogs and dominance has been debunked - years ago. Wolves don't do it and dogs don't either. Dogs are opportunists and they will try anything that works. And it's up to you to set boundaries and limit opportunities you don't want them taking.
    To this I will disagree. As there is a dominance in wolf packs and this is the Alph male and what he does and acts is the way of the pack.
    Each pack has one. If you disagree hire out a DVD about wolf packs and see.
    To Cesar I also disagree with you. I find what he has to say is right and I am yet to see him punishing any dog.
    But thankfully we can have different opinions and we more than likely will not see eye to ey on this ever.
    But I would say look to find the show which Cesar actually deal with a dog doing this exact thing and he fixed it in under hour.

  5. #5

    Default

    thanks for the feedback peeps. i think i will try to get my husband to start feeding him his food - see if that helps anything.

  6. #6

    Default

    I feed our boy and I really don't think that just doing that will make too much of a difference.
    The boss takes Murphy to Obedience Lessons each week and yet at home he will still need to be told by her a couple of times to do something. While on the other hand I ask it of him and it is close enough to an instant responce.
    Though I do our obedience training things at home while it is just me and him home.
    So if this is why he takes more notice of me I don't know.
    If it is then maybe you do some obedience stuff with him in your backyard. It wouldn't hurt even if this doesn't stop the problem.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rid**** View Post
    To this I will disagree. As there is a dominance in wolf packs and this is the Alph male and what he does and acts is the way of the pack.
    Each pack has one. If you disagree hire out a DVD about wolf packs and see.
    To Cesar I also disagree with you. I find what he has to say is right and I am yet to see him punishing any dog.
    But thankfully we can have different opinions and we more than likely will not see eye to ey on this ever.
    But I would say look to find the show which Cesar actually deal with a dog doing this exact thing and he fixed it in under hour.
    That is incorrect Ri****. Wolves like wild dogs live in family units. Mum and dad along with children, when children grow up theyleave and start their own family. All wolves/wild dogs let puppies eat first then older animals none of that alpha eats first cr*p that gets touted about. This is all verified by research on wild wolves and dogs. Eitherway domestic dogs are not wolves.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    That is incorrect Ri****. Wolves like wild dogs live in family units. Mum and dad along with children, when children grow up theyleave and start their own family. All wolves/wild dogs let puppies eat first then older animals none of that alpha eats first cr*p that gets touted about. This is all verified by research on wild wolves and dogs. Eitherway domestic dogs are not wolves.
    K&P is very correct here....I have so many videos on wolves and i have studied lots of papers and studies on wolves, they are my favourite subject. They are the most mismaligned animal in the world. blamed for so much and misread by so many. And yes they are not the same as dogs

    I have watched dogs (packs in camps) for many weeks/years at our station and seen the males take the pups hunting and allow them so much freedom and showed them how. The Alpha thing really does not seem to be the norm, good Leadership and showing them how to do things is much more how it happens. And lots of play

    I have packs of dogs at home, usually four or more (plus fosters). All our dogs eat before us. Also the dog who seems to be in charge, is the quiet one, Lukey and the girls adore him and are not al frightened of him. When the girls get a little bitchy as girls do, he just moves in and stands. No growling no aggression, sometimes he yawns (calming sign). And sometimes he re-directs them, he starts play by playbow and starting to run. it takes the pressure off. Tobias our previous male did the same. And so does Katy. If the dogs moved in and growled i am sure a real fight would start. That is one of the reasons why I have no issue with re-directing my dogs, getting their attention onto something else when they are doing something I do not like. And rewarding them as soon as they do something good. being good becomes a habit.
    That is why I think the owners having a good knowledge of basic Obedience often gets a better relationship with the dog. training can be fun and the dogs sees the owner as a good leader, someone to have confidence in, have fun with and to follow.
    Pets are forever

  9. #9

    Default

    Well this is where I have been shown I am wrong.
    But I will not conceed but what I will do is agree to disagree.
    I myself have seen shows where they have shown the Alpha male in a wolf pack.
    But I am will not to say anymore on this and leave it at that.
    I hope that this doen't come over as me being arrogant. As it isn't what I want to be.
    I have always said if proven wrong I would agree with it.
    I just feel this is wrong but I will not go on with it as it does take away from this thread.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    I agree with the others. While I might say "our dogs know we are the boss"...I dont actually subscribe to this "alpha" stuff.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •