Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: "Naughty" Dog and Recall Training

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default "Naughty" Dog and Recall Training

    My now 9mo rescue dog Banjo has been absolutely amazing. I could walk her off the lead from day one - away from roads obvioiusly. She'd always stay close, would come and check with me very regularly, would not run up to dogs unless they approached us, and would abandon her play with other dogs to follow me when I walked off. And she has generally been very responsive to training all those little things you want your dog to know, like wait before jumping out of the car when the door is opened, not pulling the lead, etc.

    I knew I still had a tough job ahead with the recall training, because I want to be able to trust her near roads as well. But it did give me a false sense of security.

    So yesterday I got very frustrated when:
    - she jumped out of the car before I told her to and hurt herself because she was still attached to the car harness
    - she bolted straight away to go run around like a lunatic with a little white pomeranian. Repeated this a couple of times with other dogs, even one on the lead - something she'd NEVER done before.
    - ran way further from me than she'd ever done before
    - ignored me completely when I called her name or walked off in the other direction

    Obviously she had no idea she was being naughty because her training has barely started. But it was so incredibly frustrating! And kind of ironic, because that's how I had expected her to behave when I got her as it's just normal behaviour for an untrained dog.

    We had to 'catch' her a few times and put her on the lead for a while. I got some comfort out of a very cute BC/Heeler cross deciding to join us for a play and ignoring his owner - who saw the humour in that - and it was good to talk to someone who understood.

    This morning Banjo was back to normal - which is in fact really quite abnormal! - and she was so very good on our walk. Even only had to call her name once to get her to follow me when she was playing with her favourite doggy playmate friend (kelpie x) that we met at the end of our walk.

    It was good that yesterday happened though and that I got reminded just how important it is to get this recall thing down pat. So I'm going to have a good think about how I'm going to tackle this, draw up a "plan" and stick to it religiously.

    Any tips on recall training more than welcome too! I made a zillion mistakes with my old dog with that. She got it eventually too, but it took me years! I want to do better this time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    I need some tips as well, I don't even know where to start trying to get them to recall when I want. Harley does most of the time but Bella either ignores me or stares at me as if to say what do you want, and then carries on her merry way!

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I read an article yesterday - sorry, just Googled, no idea where it is now - in which they gave the advice to always vary the rewards for recall. This guy said that he sometimes gave his dogs a whole hamburger for a very good recall!!! He hid them in the trees before their walk. The crux of it was that you want to keep them guessing what they will get so they're more keen to come.

    I don't think I'll go hiding hamburgers in trees (just yet ), but I will mix up different high value treats for this training. And make more of an effort to call her for things like cuddles, playing ball, etc at home.

    The other thing that all the trainers seem to agree on is to slowly increase the level of distraction. So start with no distraction until you get 100% recall (realistically, 9/10 is acceptable, I was once told by a trainer). Then train with low level distraction and keep increasing the level of distraction until they will respond even if someone else is offering them a whole hamburger! (Or if they found the hamburgers hidden in the trees! )
    Last edited by Beloz; 09-09-2011 at 12:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Beloz, how long have you had Banjo for? Could it be that yesterday he showed you some of his true colours? Abbie (not a rescue dog, but an ex show dog who quite obviously never used to get much attention before we got her) is a little the same. I sometimes used to let her off lead in the park because she was too afraid to leave my side. But the longer she has been here, the less confident i have become with letting her off lead. It was just like everything was too new and scary but now she's gained the confidence to play up a little i guess and would rather chase birds than please me.

    Everyone says the key to good recall is praise (sometimes they get a treat and sometimes they don't to keep them guessing) and to make yourself interesting to the dog. Dogs always seem to be more inclined to come running towards you if you're on the floor or doing something interesting, rather than standing still and yelling out in a monotone voice. Make sure you're not only recalling him when you're ready to go home because he'll associate coming to you with the end of playtime.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I've had her for about 5 weeks. I did think about that too - her showing her true colours now she feels more confident that I won't abandon her - but she doesn't really display any lack of confidence when she's good either. She will very readily go play with other dogs and greet their owners (way too enthusiastically) when we're out. The only times I've ever seen her show moderate fear was if a big dog ran up to her fast. But she was always quickly reassured - or just walked away calmly if the other dog didn't seem friendly.

    But I do expect this to happen more often now she realises that she can pretty much get away with it and still go home with me.

  6. #6

    Default

    Beloz you said the dog is 9 months old, hehehe welcome to adolescents your dog is now a naughty teenager and is going through a stage.

    I would stop letting her off leash for a while, do recall training on a long lead.
    Big thing with recall is never ever call your dog to do something bad (ie, bath time, clipping nails, leaving the dog park, scolding (although you should avoid scolding your dog altogether as it can damage your relationship and cause recall issues)) you should always GO and GET your dog if you are doing something the dog will not enjoy.

    Pick a particular name for your dog so it could be a shortened version of her name pref ending in an eeeee sound (its higher pitched and higher pitched noises/voices sound happy to a dog and invite them to come to you for instance when I call my dog I call "Phiiiiii") and use this as her recall name ONLY, so don't use it in day to day stuff, use it only to call her back to you and always reward her highly when you use this name. To start with you will need to "charge" the name up so start with easy stuff, so at home call her by her recall name and when she comes to you reward her highly, do this over and over again and then start to generalise, ie in the backyard, at a local park where there are no dogs so on and so forth, I would do it with a long line to start off with if you are in a park as well because if she ignores you and runs off to another dog she is being rewarded for her bad behaviour.

    Don't set your dog up to fail so if you know she isn't going to come back to you (ie is sniffing something or is playing with another dog) either DONT call her or dont let her off in the first place. The more times you call her and she ignores it the worse it will become and the harder the retraining.
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 09-09-2011 at 01:48 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Thanks KP. I avoid using the recall command when she's off the lead, unless I'm totally sure she will come (ie. when she is already heading towards me or is looking at me from a short distance away). Other times, I'll just call her name or say "c'mon" and walk away from her. With my old dog I used a whistle that meant "Hey, I'm going, you better come" but she never got in trouble for taking her time or even for ignoring me. If I was serious about her coming, I'd use the proper recall command.

    So I would like to continue walking Banjo off lead at our safe spot so she can excert some energy. But I need to absolutely do sessions on the long lead specifically for recall training. So maybe we'll do that the first or last 5 minutes of each walk. Or I'll take her to the nearby oval before or after for that.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Firstly your dog has now become comfortable in her new environment, hence she is testing the waters........I start recall training in the house with my rescues........I call the dog where there are minimum distractions and I have the best of best treat for them. I do this all the time, at food time, or just because. I set the dogs up so that i am 100% sure that they will come. So initially I only call when I know they are very likely to come or are already on the way. I always have great treats. I walk around with lots of treats.
    I also start this outside in our very large garden, I call the dog and after they come and are treated I say "off you go and let them play or sniff again. To me it is very important to call the dog a lot and let the dog go again. This way the dog does not think......You get called you come and the play/sniff/adventure stops. I will do this in the garden hundreds of times. And I still do it with the dogs I have now, quite a lot. Call and treat and Off you go ( I also use the clicker, but it is not required). When we go on our river walks or the dogs are playing I do the same. I call and let them go again. They actually think it is fun...Hey she calls lets get a treat and lets hopefully go for a play again. So my dogs get the automatic "come". They end up having a "hardwired" come. They do not even think about it. I call they come. Because we always do. But I always try to let them go again. So when I do not let them go again the letting go times have far outweigh the not letting go times. Sound confusing but it works.
    I also do long lead training on dogs that are a little more difficult and when people are not ready to spend the time, such as at Dog Training. But I personally hardly use the long lead at home
    I am also very particular about using the word "come"....When I use it the reward is awesome. So my dogs love that word. That is why they fly when we use the word in Obedience Trials.
    I have four dogs and I can call them out of play and if they are on the chase. Because I taught "wait" and "recall this way. Lots of times with no real need to recall/wait with lots of rewards.
    I agree with the good names too. Katy and Lukey are great names for recalls. Annabelle is hopeless, but she comes. Tessa is not too bad. If I have the choice i will always pick a good name for my dogs to call
    Good luck
    Last edited by newfsie; 09-09-2011 at 02:12 PM.
    Pets are forever

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    Firstly your dog has now become comfortable in her new environment, hence she is testing the waters........I start recall training in the house with my rescues........I call the dog where there are minimum distractions and I have the best of best treat for them. I do this all the time, at food time, or just because. I set the dogs up so that i am 1005 sure that they will come. So initially I only call when I know they are very likely to come or are already on the way. I always have great treats. I walk around with lots of treats.
    I also start this outside, I call the dog and after they come and are treated I say "off you go and let them play or sniff again. To me it is very important to call the dog a lot and let the dog go again. This way the dog does not think......You get called you come and the play/sniff/adventure stops. I will do this in the garden hundreds of times. And I still do it with the dogs I have now, quite a lot. Call and treat and Off you go. When we go on our river walks or the dogs are playing I do the same. I call and let them go again. They actually think it is fun...Hey she calls lets get a treat and lets hopefully go for a play again. So my dogs get the automatic "come". They end up having a "hardwired" come. They do not even think about it. I call they come. Because we always do. But I always try to let them go again. So when I do not let them go again the letting goes times have far outweighed the not letting go times. Sound confusing but it works.
    I am also very particular about using the word "come"....When I use it the reward is awesome. So my dogs love that word. That is why they fly when we use the word in Obedience Trials.
    I have four dogs and I can call them out of play and if they are on the chase. Because I taught "wait" and "recall this way. Lots of times with no real need to recall/wait with lots of rewards.
    I agree with the good names too. Katy and Lukey are great names for recalls. Annabelle is hopeless, but she comes. Tessa is not too bad. If I have the choice i will always pick a good name for my dogs to call
    Good luck
    Thanks Newfie.

    yeah that is something a do alot as well. Call them treat and then release to continue playing because the release in itself is a reward too.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I've had her for about 5 weeks. I did think about that too - her showing her true colours now she feels more confident that I won't abandon her - but she doesn't really display any lack of confidence when she's good either. She will very readily go play with other dogs and greet their owners (way too enthusiastically) when we're out. The only times I've ever seen her show moderate fear was if a big dog ran up to her fast. But she was always quickly reassured - or just walked away calmly if the other dog didn't seem friendly.

    But I do expect this to happen more often now she realises that she can pretty much get away with it and still go home with me.
    Apologies, i kept calling her a him! woops.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •