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Thread: Jumping Up

  1. #1
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    Default Jumping Up

    The 10mo rescue dog we got 2 weeks ago was/is a terrible jumper. When we met her at her foster mum's, it took us at least 10 minute before we were able to pat her because her greeting was so wild.

    I ignored her when she jumped from day one and praise her heaps when she keeps her 4 feet on the ground when she greets me. And she now only does it still when I've been away all day,l but hopefully that will get better soon too.

    It was harder with my 6yo daughter as the dog can actually hurt her with nails or teeth when she jumps up. She was determined to do the same as I did, but I helped her by just making a loud disapproving noise when the dog jumped and occasionally locking the dog out of the room if she was too wild with my daughter. And my daughter did a good job by giving the dog lots of attention when she'd calmed down.

    Now we just have to work on preventing her from jumping up on others. I will be able to get some dog-savvy adults to help us with teaching the not jumping up on visitors and down the path I will engage them to practice the not jumping up on friendly strangers in the street.

    That was a very long introduction! But my problem is with children. This dog really loves children and they are her favourite victim to greet with way too much doggy enthusiasm. I obviously cannot subject any child to her jumping up on them for the sake of training her. Even on the lead, it's too tricky to get a child close enough so they can pat her when she's got 4 feet on the ground. Because their faces are so much closer to her mouth and the dog is so fast, I just could not guarantee that I'd be able to pull her back fast enough to prevent any damage.

    I really want to get to the point where I can trust her around children who visit our place and on walks. But I don't even really know where to start.

    Any tips?

  2. #2
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    My fave place to walk my dog is next to a primary school. And those kiddies would go nuts about her - and they were all unsupervised.

    So I would make my dog (who does like to jump on people) drop and stay in a drop and then allow the kids to come and pat - ONE AT A TIME. If dog or child would not comply, I would simply take her away and tell the kids - enough for today and she's not a toy. Said "she's not a toy" quite a lot.

    The worst problem I had was with one of my neighbours, who would not stand still when she came to my door and she would crowd the door so I could not get my dog outside (excited pee risk). And she would wave her arms and flap and squeal and tell my dog how naughty she was. Urm- it's not the dog, lady.

    Anyway I would also make my dog drop. And she'd roll over and put all her paws in the air and lie there. And dog definitely stayed on a very very short lead around that lady. We can do reasonably civilised greetings now. But it was hard work.

    It is harder for a dog to jump on a kid from a drop than from a stand or sit. And you've got more time to prevent it.

  3. #3
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    Default

    That's definitely useful advice, thanks! I haven't started teaching her drop yet, but I'll get onto it straight away.

    I did forget to mention that she also has an issue with mouthing. Both my daughter and I have been surprised a few times by her suddenly jerking her head up with open mouth. So we will have to still watch out for that even when she's lying down.

  4. #4
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    I think you have to take a few steps back and do some Positive reinforcement obedience training...teach the drop and sit. And teach the dog to focus. Reward when your dog sits and maybe if your kids are small, teach the dog it can only be greeted by them in the drop or at least sit. I would all of this on lead, because at least you will be able to stop the dog from hurting the child.
    Another basic thing is to tone down greetings when you come home. we actually ignore our dogs when we first come home. we go and put our chickens away, check the mail and only when they are all sitting quietly do we greet them quietly. if they are too exited and boisterous we ignore them.
    Another thing people often do is move back when a dog goes to jump up...I move into the dog. I do not kick or push the dog I just move forward very quick ( not for the kids to do, but the adults) it often stops the dog.
    If you google dog jumping you will see that their are lots and lots of info.
    If you do start a method, it is important to stick with it......keep up the same system.
    My last newfie rescue, was a terrible jumper. I did the move into him trick, because the ignore actually made him jump on to my back and get very anxious. We still do the low key greetings.
    Not every idea works on every dog, so some of it you have to suss out for yourself. I have got quite used to assessing a dog to see what works.
    Good luck, happy training
    Pets are forever

  5. #5
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    I don't really have a problem with teaching the dog not to jump up on me. It just requires consistency indeed and it definitely seems to be working. My daughter is 6 1/2 and has been doing a stellar job at cooperating with me to teach the dog to be calm around her too. Because she's my child and she is who she is, she has occasionally suffered some 'collateral damage' in the process (I don't mean actual injuries!) but we both feel we've made great progress.

    But I will indeed need to do some more basic training with the dog first before I can tackle the jumping up on others issue. Knowing that will be a good motivator to get on top of the basic stuff too because obviously I want to solve the greeting issue asap. I hate having to confine the dog when we have visitors.

  6. #6
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    Teaching Bite Inhibition | Dog Star Daily

    the "ouch" or yelp method never really worked well with my dog. Holding my hand still or gently pushing worked better though you do get chomped a little bit in the process. It does take the fun out of mouthing.

    She still mouths me a little bit but it's more like using her mouth as a hand - she doesn't actually bite or clamp down at all. Which is good cos she can break (marrow) bones.

    Definitely want to keep strangers' kids away from her until you're reasonably sure she won't bite or put her mouth on them. It's too easy to be misunderstood by freaked out parents (or teachers).

    In your house - if you don't want to confine her - you need to get agreement from your visitors to be ok with a bit of jumping up risk and explain to them what you want them to do.

    I often put my dog on lead and stood or sat on it to limit how far she could go with visitors. Or when I was visiting. Otherwise she'd have to go outside or in the crate for the duration. She still likes to lick everybody though.

  7. #7

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    My litle mate Murphy has a real bad habit of jumping up. And in this jumping up he tends to try to have a snap at you. It is all innocent at this time but it could turn bad. for both him and the one he is jumping up to. Like yesterday he jumped up to me and got a tooth caught in my shirt he pulled a thread out.

    I have already started on stopping this as it is just getting too much. I can see when he is about to do it and I tell him no before he does it and this is working. But sometimes I just don't see it happening like what I put down already.

    The granddaughter has the right idea she turns her back to him when he jumps and he gets this message real well and stops. But this is the reason why I want it stopped as the youngest does doesn't like dogs too much. So the better I have him the better she will be. I can see it begining to work, but at this time he is learning alot so I have to be ready to correct him now and not when he is an adult.

  8. #8

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    Make sure your daughter ignores the dog first thing in the mornings and when coming home from school etc as well, it is important that the dog doesn't get any attention from anyone until he/she has calmed down. This will help with jumping a lot. The same goes for visitors.

    It is one thing Cesar Milan does that I agree with. No touch, no talk, no eye contact with the dog when you, your daughter, your partner/oh (if you have one) and visitors arrive at your home. A couple weeks of this and your dog won't even bother greeting you when you come home because he/she will know you are not going to give them any attention until your ready. When you are ready to give the dog attention make sure you call the dog over to you or go to the dog, never let the dog initiate first contact (ie: don't pat your dog if it walks up to you first)

    All good suggestions in the posts above

  9. #9
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    "And in this jumping up he tends to try to have a snap at you."

    Yes! Our Banjo resembles a snappy little crocodile sometimes! Not a shred of aggression in there, just a totally inappropriate way of showing affection and excitement.

    Thanks for all the suggestions. We will start working on putting some strict rules in place. I must admit that I find the no greeting the dog when I get home really hard myself. It makes one feel so loved.

    But I have read/heard quite a few good arguments on why you should ignore your dog when you come home. The reason why I started doing it was actually because making the home coming less exciting is supposed to reduce separation anxiety issues too.

  10. #10
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    My daughter and I came home together today so I briefed her on what we were going to do and we both ignored the dog and just did our own stuff until she stopped bugging us and laid down. I must say that I was amazed at how quickly she gave up. I think after this thread - and especially the tip on not giving attention when she asks - we must have just come across as more determined and she realised it was futile to keep trying very quickly. So nice!

    I also taught her 'down' (aka drop) today. I never bothered teaching my old dog, though she would usually lie down if I patted the spot where I wanted her.

    It was so easy and I really enjoyed doing it. We only did it about 6 times and we'll have to do it a few times more with luring before she gets it, but it was a good start.

    This dog really has come such a long way already in only 2 weeks time. It's very exciting!

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