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Thread: Article on Dog Behaviour

  1. #1
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    Default Article on Dog Behaviour

    An interesting Article on Dog behaviour. Am thinking of buying the book. Has anyone read it? Any opinions??

    Why dog trainers will have to change their ways | Science | The Observer

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    I think if puppies/dogs were raised with lots of positive reinforcement and only negative punishment form very early age this would follow. And I full agree that you do not need the hierarchal/dominant system that some older style dog trainers use.

    HOWEVER......When you get some problem dogs (and this is not all dogs) that have been mistreated or just not trained and have behaviour problems you can not go with R+ and P- alone.
    And to be fair to Cesar Milan, we only ever see him with problem dogs. I have never seen a program where Cesar starts a puppy. I would love to see one, if there is on to see.
    Now I am no psychologist i can only speak from my own experiences with dealing with quite a few problem giant Rescues
    I have two examples here at home......my most recent Rescue, who was mistreated and badly behaved and had no idea of obedience is doing really well with R+/P-. And he is just going really well.
    My previous Rescue, went quite aggressive with that system and we had to use Positive Punishment and we had to dominate her, which is not how I ever had managed a dog before, but nothing else worked. But now we really treat her the same as our other dogs.
    I truly think from personal experience that there is no "only this way".
    I have read quite a lot of Professor John Bradshaw articles, but not the whole book.
    I avidly follow Ian Dunbar, Susan Garret and many other positive reinforcement trainers. And I love clicker training. But I will not completely condemn those trainers who deal with the real problem dogs and use the systems similar to Cesar. To me each dog is individual and needs to be taken on the best road possible to train/re-train. In the method suited most to them.
    Delta and the Vet behaviourists i dealt with wanted to PTS my Annabelle.......The Cesar Milan style Trainer took her on and made her a happy social dog.
    I know I keep repeating my story about my previously people/dog aggressive Annabelle. But I just feel that people should keep an open mind. I will always start the Positive Reinforcement way first, but I will try anything before I just give up and PTS my dog
    Pets are forever

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    I found the article interesting and perhas the book will be worth reading for informational purposes but there wasnt really anything new.

    I thought it was let down a bit with the translation for "head on side". This has nothing to do with owner reaction. My dogs do this when trying to pinpoint a noice, or listening to certain frequencies, or when they hear a new strange sound....there is no pleasing response from me because it looks cute.

    Personally, I have my own ideas about dogs and dog behaviour that is a mesh of different ideas from all over the place; TV, docos, books, internet, other people, trainers and most importantly experience. Seems to work for us.

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    Hm. I take your point that there is not ONE-method-fits-all. I guess it can never be like that - just like we are all different and so are our dogs. It wasn't meant to be a Cesar Milan bash up, and neither does John Bradshaw from what I can tell.

    Our dog responds very well to reward based training, while his sister is a completely different personality. She is much more independent. I'm sometimes wondering though how she would have turned out would she have been raised differently. She has always been an outside dog and was trained 'old school'. While our Nero is very much an inside dog, quite cuddly and focused on us. I guess it also depends on the dogs purpose. Whether it is upbringing, personality or a mix of both: I'm pretty sure our Nero would make a lousy working dog - while his sister would probably pretty good at it.

    After one year I'm still new to this. I never owned a dog before and this whole world of dogs is entirely new and (at times) wondrous to me But I owned a horse for many years so clicker training isn't new to me and neither is the bashing up of other 'ideologies' and trainings methods My little mare would not respond to positive reinforcement AT ALL. She'd just eat all the treats 'thank you very much' but learn nothing. Every day was a new beginning. She was only responsive when I dominated her - and she knew exactly when I really meant it... and when I was just acting it.

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    I find with my own dog, that violence begets violence, ie if I'm rough with her, she's rough with me.

    If I get angry with her - she turns into limp custard upside down on the floor which cracks me up. Solves her problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I find with my own dog, that violence begets violence, ie if I'm rough with her, she's rough with me.

    If I get angry with her - she turns into limp custard upside down on the floor which cracks me up. Solves her problem.

    LMAO oh I know that action...or the "try to preemptively do soemthing mum might want me to do" and Barney is throwing himself into a down, then popping into a sit, then lunging into a roll then shoving a high five at ya LMAO

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