Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Strength Testing

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    A dog trainer used it on my dog the other day and told me that I am never to do it. I was just wondering if it was normal practise because I was very unsure of it and now my dog is limping but i can't be positive if it was from the 'strength test' or something else.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    AV

    I would not let a dog trainer like that near my dog. Yikes.

    If you've spent money with them, ask for it back. If they say no, tell them you're going to the RSPCA. If you've paid by credit card - ask the credit card company for a refund - reason - you didn't get what you paid for (eg a "dog trainer" not a "dog abuser").

    There are a couple of instructors at my club who like to "jerk a dog's chain" and there is no way I'd let either of them handle my dog not even to hold her while I go to the club toilet.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I can't be certain she did it to your dog either. It's a pity you didn't have video ie of dog moving normally then being pushed over then limping.

    Hopefully it's not a serious injury and she will be back to normal inside 10 days. But if she's having massive problems weight bearing - it could be ligament damage - and you'd want to get that checked out by a vet.

    Lots of things can cause a dog to limp. My dog has been chomped (play bite?) by a bad rottie - limped for about 20 minutes and then got over it. Bee sting - limped for a day or two even though I got the sting out very quickly. And one mighty crash with an irish wolfhound - limped for a couple of days. I kept her exercise to on lead walking until she was better after that one - so she couldn't make it worse.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Thanks Hyacinth,
    I have spend a lot of money on this trainer and now that she has done that I am lacking confidence in her 'training' methods but at the same time have no idea what else to do. She also taught me that when a dog leans on you, it's not because they love you but because they are trying to be dominant, is that correct?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    AV; a dog trainer who uses a technique then tells you never to try it is dodgy. That is definitely NOT my idea of usefully educating an owner and I'd distance myself from her, pronto!

    Yes, dogs moving into your personal space CAN be a dominant behaviour; but it can also be a multitude of other things, too- seeking reassurance, wanting a pat, enjoying being close. I have no idea which it is in your dog, but a general rule of thumb is to see if the dog will move. Ie- dog sits on your foot, you gently but firmly push away. If the dog resists or even pushes back, it could be dominance. If the dog moves away readily and waits to be invited back into your space, it is likely to be something different. But that's just a general overview, a good trainer would need to actually see you and your dog interact to really say for sure.

    Why on earth was this trainer 'strength testing' your dog? Do you have behavioral issues you are dealing with?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    I have 2 dogs and one is older (maybe 6) and is hard to walk, she pulls constantly and so this was done when the 'whisper walk' was not going so well and the dog kept pulling.

  7. #17

    Default

    Wow, definitely get as far away from this trainer as you can. If it were me I'd be standing in their office with a hoard of goonies demanding my money back... but I can be a little over dramatic.

    So the problem is pulling? There are many other alternatives to shoving a dog to the ground from simple training techniques to tools like harnesses and gentle leaders.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alacrityvirtue View Post
    I have 2 dogs and one is older (maybe 6) and is hard to walk, she pulls constantly and so this was done when the 'whisper walk' was not going so well and the dog kept pulling.
    What is a 'Whisper Walk'?

    A dog pulls because of a thing called 'opposition refex', that is, the more backwards pressure you put on the collar or harness, the more the dog will push into the pressure. Ergo, why sled dogs pull sleds, if you like the analogy.

    When I train a 'Loose leash' or 'Social' walk (ie, not a formal heel), I like to do what I call 'the sneaky'... That is, when my dog reaches the end of the leash (and I prefer a 6 foot or longer leash for better control), I give a small pop on the leash (not a jerk or yank!! More like a tap on the shoulder) and at the same time I turn 180 degrees and walk the opposite way. I then encourage my dog to come up beside me by making nice noises, patting my leg etc to let him/her know what I want. You can even give a treat when your dog reaches your side. Then when my dog goes out in front, I repeat the process.

    This means initially you will be going back and forward over the same ground while your dog processes and understands the pattern- if I pull, I won't get to where I want, and my beloved owner will be walking away from me.

    I call it 'the sneaky' because you are 'outsmarting' your dog, lol. Most dogs HATE their owner going away from them!

    But you have to be unpredictable- don't do the same number of steps in each direction or your dog will see a pattern and you are no longer 'sneaky'!!!

    I have only one rule for the social/ loose leash walk. The dog may sniff, be in front or behind or anywhere as long as they DO NOT pull!!

    Of course, you MUST start in an area of low/ no distraction to teach this calso use a flat collar. When your dog 'gets it' move to a new level of (only slightly) higher distraction and so on.

    During this teaching phase, there are NO corrections, and LOTS if praise. Once your dog is good at this, you can move forward to introducing a correction (martingale collars, properly fitted are excellent) for letting the leash go tight.

    This takes TIME and PATIENCE but is well worth it as it provides a good foundation for your dog to learn a) what is right and b) what is not ok.

    Remember; dogs seek things that benefit them- make keeping the leash loose a benefit to your dog and you'll both win!!

    And, lastly, during this time, you will only 'walk' your dog in the distraction area/level you are up to. If you need to go in a straight line to somewhere, or get there quickly- leave your dog at home. Any inconsistency will slow your progress.

    Hope that helps... And DITCH the trainer!!!!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    AV

    I seriously think this dog trainer is deluded or thinks what Cesar Milan does is a good idea.

    There are much better ways to teach loose lead walking as V&F has described. I also use a couple of techniques - a front attach harness called a "sensible" and lots of treats in the "reinforcement zone" next to my hip. And I use the stop and come back method ie if she gets to the end of the lead I stop and she has to come back to the heel position before I move again. She doesn't have to stay there but if she starts leaning on the lead and collar - I stop again.

    I'm wondering if there are some good dog trainers or a dog club near Shepphardton vic that you could go to instead.

    I would suggest asking Steve at K9pro.com.au if he knows anyone.

    Otherwise - loose lead walking should be something you can achieve yourself without beating your dog up.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    omg so that was done by a real trainer...my god.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •