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Thread: Trouble Training Rottweiler Cross.

  1. #1

    Default Trouble Training Rottweiler Cross.

    Hi all, first post here and looking for a bit of advice.

    About 6 months ago me and my family picked up a rottweiler cross from a shelter, he seemed really calm and friendly at the time but we've been having some troubles with him since. It's gotten to the point where my mother feels we may have to return him and that might yet be the case even though we love him dearly, we're trying to avoid that at all costs, hence why I'm here.

    He is about 2 years old and quite boisterous, the main problems are that he can snap at people and sometimes become aggressive with smaller dogs, he is in fact very friendly and he never takes it too far but it is still worrisome. Among other problems are his attention span which makes it very hard to train him, he is constantly running away, he nips at peoples heels when we walk in the house.

    I'm guessing he needs a very strong owner, I'd like to hear from any people who own rottweilers and any advice they might have on training him. I'm at the point where I think I might have to step in and take over from my mother because she really cant handle him and is becoming stressed. I am not an experienced dog owner though (I'm willing to learn though), I do want honesty though and if this may be out of my league I'd expect you to be frank.

    He is walked for about an hour a day, has a friend (although she is older and less prone to play) and we spend a fair bit of time playing with him but he always seems to have more energy.

    Thanks in advance for any input, and sorry for the long post.

  2. #2
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    How old is he?

    I have a 6 year old dog who is still extremely boisterous and will knock you over if you dont watch where hes running LOL

    Per haps the exercise needs to be something a bit faster/more energy burnt but again, this will depend on age too

  3. #3
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    Hi Shamus,

    It is a difficult one and I do not certainly want to see the dog going back to the shelter knowing what can happen to him. Not knowing what you have to the dog so far and what daily routine is like, it is even difficult to share our experiences here.

    I think you need to seek help from the professional urgently.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  4. #4

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    I have 2 rotties under 2. And its a handful. Harley is full of energy and never seems to tire. Lily on the otherhand is less active. ( I sit on ground in yard lily lays on my lap Harley tries to put tennis balls as close to my face as possible so I can throw it. ).

    He needs to know who is the boss and you or your mum should never give in to this as hard as it can be. Or as pushy as he can become.

    Harley sometimes pushes his limits too. He can jump up and nip. ( I blame OH for play fights when he was a puppy). As he can jump up and put his feet on my shoulders and look me in the eye it can really hurt if he does this unexpectedly or u cop a paw in the mouth. After much repetition they have now learnt that they will be ignored until they are calm. Although they are still crazy when I go out there they still pull it together after a min and wait for me to pat them.
    Is your guy food driven. If so he will be much easier to train.

    It does sound Like you might need some professional help for a little bit or some lessons with a trainer
    I hope you have success with him as at the shelter he prob won't have much luck finding another home.

    I would say start with him learning basic commands or refreshing his memory. Get him in mood to learn with some treats.
    Give him a place in the house (crate or mat ) that is his area if he comes in. It may take a while to learn to stay but I find ours have been much easier to deal with inside since they learned "on your mat" Harley has even learnt that after a few on your mat warnings "out" occurs and will sprint to his mat in a last ditched effort to stay inside. But I find they respect us alot more with structure and us being firm and consistent.

  5. #5

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    I also found cisar Milans shows helpful. Others here may not and I respect that I just found that his methods of teaching "pack leader" stuff really helpful

  6. #6
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    He is about 2 years old and quite boisterous, the main problems are that he can snap at people and sometimes become aggressive with smaller dogs, he is in fact very friendly and he never takes it too far but it is still worrisome.
    This I call "Owner in denial".

    He isn't friendly. The aggression needs management and control. Ie don't let him get into situations where he can do all these bad things, keep him on head - with a front attach harness or a lead and a halti and maybe a muzzle for when you go for walks.

    A muzzle saved my dog's life from a "boisterous and playful" rotti. The owner put the muzzle on his dog (and started crating her) to make other dog club members feel safer - ie he didn't admit that his dog had a problem. And then the owner let his dog off the lead when she was clearly eyeing off my dog and another one for her "special attention" ie attack.

    Fortunately when she came charging, growling and snapping, she couldn't do any serious damage - apart from having a heavy rotti jumping on my dog, which made mine scream.

    But if the owner had required his dog to behave calmly and obediently before allowing any interaction with other dogs, ie no dragging on the lead and jumping on other dogs (which owner thought was ok because she was only "playful")... it might not have happened.

    That owner set no boundaries for his dog's behaviour so it got steadily worse until it attacked my dog. My dog wasn't near his dog at the time or looking at his dog and you don't get more of a grovel dog than mine. I was shocked.

    And he hasn't been back in our class since.

    Which is sad because he's really enthusiastic about his dog and the dog club. He's just got no idea that other people might be right about his dog's behaviour being unacceptable. Well I think he does now, but it would have been better if he'd listened 2 years ago and every week since.

    So that's where I'm coming from when I tell you that your dog is behaving unacceptably and someone or some dog will be seriously hurt or killed if you don't set limits and train appropriate behaviour NOW RIGHT NOW.

    It can be done but you need to find help.

    I ask you to give these guys a ring or an email and ask them to recommend someone in your area.
    K9 Pro The K9 Professionals; Dog Training and Behaviour Site
    read the articles on the site to get an idea of how to recognise a good dog trainer/behaviourist and some more ideas about how to manage your dog. Ie do not let it off lead in situations where it has previously been attacking people or dogs. Do not let it roam your house if it is nipping people as they walk along. Put it in a crate when you are not training or exercising it. Investigate and use the NILIF program and the Triangle of Temptation program.

    Require it to be calm and obedient before allowing it to greet any person or dog. Ie no dragging on the lead to get to where it wants to go. Just stop or walk (drag the dog) away until it calms down and pays attention to you. Keep it on lead until you can reliably complete a walk without it trying to lunge where it wants to go. Keep it on lead until it can reliably recall to you at home and test with a long line in places of low distractions, if it nicks off, jump on the line and go back to on lead walking. Learn to train a recall using conditioned response - the kind where the dog just does, it doesn't blow you off because it's got better things to do like run across a road to attack some unfortunate animal or human.

    His attention span will improve when he has more value and respect for you. Right now he couldn't care less about you.

    meantime have a look at this.
    http://www.dogstardaily.com/video-cc.../field_video_0
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 07-02-2011 at 09:12 PM.

  7. #7
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    lets just for arguments sake say that the OP is not overly dog knowledgeable (not meaning I am but lets say they are really a beginner). The OP is saying the dog snaps at people, and can be aggessive with smaller dogs.

    If someone who didnt know dogs well was to come round to my house, they would assume Barney was beign aggressive to our much smaller dog too, when in fact he i playing. Also the snapping could be excitement and the dog just hasnt been taught its not OK.

    I think it is to hard to judge really based on the originl post and more details are needed.

    I.e. explain about the snapping at people and aggression to smaller dogs in heaps of detail.

  8. #8

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    Thanks for all the replies guys, sorry it's taken me so long to reply but it looks like he is going back and I've been pretty upset since.

    She made the decision and it's stressing her out enough as it is so I'm not going to push it.

    Still I appreciate the words, he'll find a good home, the place we're returning him too doesn't put their dogs down, I just hope with a bit more info they will find a more suitable owner for him. Someone will pick him up, he's super friendly and cute. I'm not nearly as naive as that makes me sound, I'm just trying to be succinct.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the update Shamus.

    It would help if you're honest with the people you're placing the dog with about what your problems have been so they can work on appropriate re-training and make sure the next home can continue that.

  10. #10

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    I would suggest check his diet that he isn't have junk food. One thing I learnt diet is important and no human food. Like the others say he is probably just very excited to see others but isn't very agro. Treats really work. I still use them if Axel gets boisterous. He gets very excited when people come over and wants to greet everyone, yeh he jumps on them. I am working on it. He didn't do it for 3 months and now he is again. I suppose hes feeling better. good luck but call your vet for suggestions cause you should have someone around there that can help. There is generally someone around who has the knowledge to help.

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