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Thread: My Many Problems

  1. #11

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    Thanks again Hyacinth. It is difficult though because I don't know the owner and although he's very friendly about it, he just tends to walk away. But the last time he did stay long enough for me to give a similar sort of thing a go. The wolfhound was just standing there very calm so I'd bring my dog closer and closer but I didn't have any treats or distractions so I couldn't work it properly.

    She's actually really good at playing with bigger dogs. She wrestles with and beats a GSD and a GD that are both at least 20kg heavier than her. She was just in the wrong place at the wrong time on this day and it seems to have drastically affected her. Luckily though, it's just these two particular dogs. Once they had gone another Irish Wolfhound came bounding over and she was fine with it.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    Hi Buddhy

    There are some dogs I'm not willing to let my dog play with at all, even if she's willing. the first would be the crazy whippet, the second would be a nasty biting rottweiler that has a deluded owner - she's only being playful, so why is my dog limpingn from being chomped. And there is a tall staffy x and a malamute that when my dog sees those, she tries to run all the way home with them in hot pursuit. I haven't seen them at our park recently thank Dog. Same with an increasingly savage (has started drawing blood on other dogs) GR at our other park. Haven't seen it since last november either, good riddance (stupid owner).

    My dog will run up to horses and bark like yours does to those two dogs but I don't want her making a habit of that either so if I see horses at the beach or anywhere else, I put her on lead and keep her attention on me.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post


    Some of the ridgebacks and ridgeback crosses I've met have had some stunning prangs. They don't look where they're going. If you can call your dog to change direction before it prangs that helps but don't expect it to notice the other dog, person, car, fence, tree.
    Firstly Buddhy I have an RR X and she had/has the same issue but the good news is backyard destruction has stopped now (she is 3.5 yo now) but if i was you I would be looking into seeing a behaviouralist about the fear issues especially with dogs/people because that can escalate as the dog matures. My girl has DA issues I wish I had gotten onto it prior to its escalation which happened around 18months-2 years old. In saying that I have a 2nd dog who is 8months old and she is fine with her. Keira (my RRx) has severe HD and still has endless energy so dont expect that to change.

    Lots of good advice already provided here.

    LMAO @ Hya this is sooooo true Keira has thr worst prangs she is nuts and often will crash because she is not looking!

  4. #14

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    Thought I should bump this and get some more opinions on the digging problem. Over the last week she's started digging the hell out of the garden and lawn after not doing it for several months. It's still really cold here so I know it's not a getting cool thing. Nothing has changed in this time; she still gets heaps of exercise, her diet is the same, people are home at the same times. Yesterday I walked her and the other dog, a real good walk and a bit of a run at the park at the end. When we got home I left them and went off to the shops. I came back 30 minutes later and she had dug two massive holes, two smaller ones, and ripped up a box and a big piece of foam. I can't say I care too much about the garden but I still live at home and it's my parents garden, and they do care. I've seen a few of those clam shells lying around in bulk rubbish so I might grab one of them and try and get her to dig in that. But I have tried designated digging areas with her before and she's not interested at all.

    The dog aggression issues are still a work in progress. It's amazing how different she can be with particular dogs for no reason at all. But she's had a few good meets lately and been fairly gentle with a couple of puppies so it's not too bad. The people thing is still the main problem. At the park last week there was an older man walking his JRT. Abby said hello to the dog then we walked off. About 5 minutes later the man came around the corner without his dog in sight and Abby did the whole deep barking and fear aggression stuff. Then his dog reappeared and she stopped. She even did the low bark at a little toddler that we ran past the other day, so I think I'm going to have to fork out on a behavioural expert to get this one sorted.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buddhy View Post
    Thought I should bump this and get some more opinions on the digging problem. Over the last week she's started digging the hell out of the garden and lawn after not doing it for several months. It's still really cold here so I know it's not a getting cool thing. Nothing has changed in this time; she still gets heaps of exercise, her diet is the same, people are home at the same times. Yesterday I walked her and the other dog, a real good walk and a bit of a run at the park at the end. When we got home I left them and went off to the shops. I came back 30 minutes later and she had dug two massive holes, two smaller ones, and ripped up a box and a big piece of foam. I can't say I care too much about the garden but I still live at home and it's my parents garden, and they do care. I've seen a few of those clam shells lying around in bulk rubbish so I might grab one of them and try and get her to dig in that. But I have tried designated digging areas with her before and she's not interested at all.

    The dog aggression issues are still a work in progress. It's amazing how different she can be with particular dogs for no reason at all. But she's had a few good meets lately and been fairly gentle with a couple of puppies so it's not too bad. The people thing is still the main problem. At the park last week there was an older man walking his JRT. Abby said hello to the dog then we walked off. About 5 minutes later the man came around the corner without his dog in sight and Abby did the whole deep barking and fear aggression stuff. Then his dog reappeared and she stopped. She even did the low bark at a little toddler that we ran past the other day, so I think I'm going to have to fork out on a behavioural expert to get this one sorted.
    My dog digs just to lay in the hole sometimes, not because she is bored or under stimulated but because she likes laying in the hole lmao, and yes this is my RR x. I would try the clam shell idea, try burying a few things in it for her as well, ie: a couple toys, maybe a bone or some treats, will keep her occupied and interested.

    Yes, I did recommend a behaviorist 5 - 6 months ago because without proper instruction her issues will get worse and she is now 12 months old with a limited amount of time to work on these issues before she reaches maturity, when she reaches maturity it will be a lot harder to fix her issues.. The last thing you want is for her to lash out at a person or child who startles her and end up with a dog declared dangerous or needing to be euthanized.
    With the picking and choosing dogs, this is not unusual, dogs (like people) don't have to like everyone they meet, sometimes they just don't get along, something about the dog rubs them to wrong way, the dog may be over the top or rude. Preferably though your dog will just ignore dogs she doesn't like. It is also your job to remove your dog from a situation if she is clearly fearful, anxious or in anyway uncomfortable. If your dog starts to feel she needs to react as you are not reading her signals and removing her from the situation then she will start to protect herself.

    What area are you based in so we can recommend some reputable behavioural trainers in your area?
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 09-08-2011 at 01:48 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

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    Hole digging is fun and self rewarding. Some dogs do it more than others. Normally it stems from boredom but lots of times it continues because of the shear joy of it. Install a sandpit area and train to use that area alone.

    I am a hound enthusiast and owner of Whippets just about every RR exhibitor also has Whippets so I've come to know a lot of RR in recent years.

    By nature they can (and I say CAN because there are exceptions to the rule) be a suspicious breed. If you look at their role as protector it is part of the breed. They can also be a breed that doesn't exist for anyone other than those they consider their family, everyone else can fall off the face of the earth.

    Many dogs can be a bit nervy or pushy or bossy (think teenager) around the adolescent age bracket of 8-16 months of age and come out the other side lovely dogs. Though it pays to be aware of the problems and work positively to rectify them.
    Last edited by MAC; 09-09-2011 at 08:28 AM.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    My dog digs just to lay in the hole sometimes, not because she is bored or under stimulated but because she likes laying in the hole lmao, and yes this is my RR x. I would try the clam shell idea, try burying a few things in it for her as well, ie: a couple toys, maybe a bone or some treats, will keep her occupied and interested.

    Yes, I did recommend a behaviorist 5 - 6 months ago because without proper instruction her issues will get worse and she is now 12 months old with a limited amount of time to work on these issues before she reaches maturity, when she reaches maturity it will be a lot harder to fix her issues.. The last thing you want is for her to lash out at a person or child who startles her and end up with a dog declared dangerous or needing to be euthanized.
    With the picking and choosing dogs, this is not unusual, dogs (like people) don't have to like everyone they meet, sometimes they just don't get along, something about the dog rubs them to wrong way, the dog may be over the top or rude. Preferably though your dog will just ignore dogs she doesn't like. It is also your job to remove your dog from a situation if she is clearly fearful, anxious or in anyway uncomfortable. If your dog starts to feel she needs to react as you are not reading her signals and removing her from the situation then she will start to protect herself.

    What area are you based in so we can recommend some reputable behavioural trainers in your area?
    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    Hole digging is fun and self rewarding. Some dogs do it more than others. Normally it stems from boredom but lots of times it continues because of the shear joy of it. Install a sandpit area and train to use that area alone.

    I am a hound enthusiast and owner of Whippets just about every RR exhibitor also has Whippets so I've come to know a lot of RR in recent years.

    By nature they can (and I say CAN because there are exceptions to the rule) be a suspicious breed. If you look at their role as protector it is part of the breed. They can also be a breed that doesn't exist for anyone other than those they consider their family, everyone else can fall off the face of the earth.

    Many dogs can be a bit nervy or pushy or bossy (think teenager) around the adolescent age bracket of 8-16 months of age and come out the other side lovely dogs. Though it pays to be aware of the problems and work positively to rectify them.
    Thanks for the advice both of you.

    I am based in Perth, Northern Suburbs area.

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