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Thread: Staffies Fighting

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queanbeyan NSW
    Posts
    13

    Default Staffies Fighting

    Hi, I live in Canberra and I have 2 staffies a de-sexed 9 y/o and a 15 month old male that was de-sexed last week. I got the pup at 12 weeks of age and they both have got along great. Yes at time the older male would "put the pup in his place" but nothing over top. 7 - 10 days ago they started to have encounters that became very nasty and happened like lightening. The day before the pup was due to be de-sexed they had a vicious altercation in which the 9 y/o required stitches to the ear and snout. The vet suggested a bitch may have come on heat in the area which has started the problem. He feels after the 15 month olds hormone levels drop (1 or 2 months time), things should settle. Currently I am keeping them isolated from each other while I seek advice. I have been told I should bring in a K9 behaviour specialist sooner rather than later. I have spoken to 2 and both say they can resolve this problem. One has been a do trainer / handler for 24 years including working with the Australian Federal Police K9's. Of course this comes at a cost and i am happy to pay as long as it produces results. They are both fantastic dogs and parting with either is an unbearable thought but something has to happen. Can anyone give me advice on this problem so i can do what's right for the Dogs and the rest of the pack (the family). Many thanks Kevin

  2. #2

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    Hi, it's important that you remember that Staffords are infact fighting dogs... it's very difficult to have two of either sex together not something I would ever recommend to anyone without lots of experience... my advice would have been to have your young dog desexed as early as possible... but its too late for that now... get him done asap (if not already) and I would also be speaking to your vet about female hormone's... I do not believe any trainer will be able to help you... I would not be leaving these two dogs alone together at least not until your comfortable with them again... (never)... As far as the reason the two boys have now had the fight it's not really relevent... once they have had one fight you can be sure others will follow... I actually do own two boys one older 12 and a youngster 10 months... they are supervised at all times... (I'm lucky that they can come to work with me)... but when I do have the house one is always locked away... if you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask... I've been training staffords for many years and have a good understanding of them... if you do look to use an outside trainer make sure they understand staffords, they are not the same as other breeds...

    Oops just read that your young boy is now desexed... great...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    I hope you can get it sorted, but tbh, I wouldnt hold out much hope with staffs.

    Dont get me wrong, I love staffs, I think they are just th emost awesome little dogs but as the other poster said, they are bred for fighting.

    I grew up with a border collie and a staff and as soon as the staffy bitch reached maturity, she decided she wanted to be top dog and for the remainder of the border collies life, the 2 dogs had to separated. Sometimes they could be OK together but you just never knew when it was going to flare up.

    Good luck though

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queanbeyan NSW
    Posts
    13

    Default Thank you

    Yes the young male has been de-sexed. Having 2 together was something i put a lot of thought into for the reason you stated, they are a fighting dog. I realize that is a genetic trait that will always be present. It was only after I sought advice from breeders, RSPCA etc. and thought about the plan for some months before I brought the pup. I have such a love of the breed and they are all to often a misunderstood breed. Many people I know are terrified of my dogs based on their looks and reputation. I do take ownership of my boys very serious and love them to death and they have provided me with lots of affection and company as I suffer a disability and cannot work full time. Both are purely inside dogs. The strange thing is they will walk together and even eat side by side with no problems at all (but i normally feed the apart, older dog first) so there has never been any food aggression or aggression to other people or dogs for that matter. I will keep an eye out for further posts and continue to work with the dogs under muzzled conditions to see if anything changes. At worst the younger dog will be an outside dog during the day when no one is home and come in of a night. (The older white male hates outside where the younger one loves it). I feel so bad one was injured as I detest any thought of people "fighting" these dogs for fun and that's a major reason re-homing him would be a very hard thing to do. I can still give him a loving, caring home environment regardless of what measures i need to take to ensure their safety. Thanks again for your input as I'm really stressed over this. Kevin.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    I disagree with the others. How can you rule out any help simply because of their breed?
    Breed means nothing, this is behavioural issue, that any breed can have. My Kelpie is more 'vicious' towards other dogs then any SBT I've ever met-no joke!
    We have a Staffy client, and she is the most submissive sooky dog I've ever met. She naturally rolls over when ever she meets anyone or any dog.
    I'm a vet nurse, and what your vet suggested sounds very likely.
    Have there been any warning signs before these attacks?
    Has food, toys or human affection been involved?
    Education not Legislation

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    I disagree with the others. How can you rule out any help simply because of their breed?
    Not sure what you mean by this... infact I am not trying to rule out help, but give the correct advice... Sorry but its a fact that the same methods you might use for a border collie are not adequate in this situation... I have owned quite a few staffords and they are all very different in tempermant... but they are all still staffords and all have the same ability to injure their play alone is enough to injure some dogs... they are rough tough dogs...

    To say that Breed means nothing shows only ignorance... try getting a stafford to round up a heard of sheep and see what the outcome is...

  7. #7

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    Stubbie, just wanted to make myself clear... do not separate your two boys while your with them, treat them the same as you had prior... but I wouldn't be leaving them alone together when you are not home.... dogs (especially males) forget about the fight as soon as it's over... revenge is not a word they understand... they will be buddies again... but you need to understand the reason the fight happened doesnt matter now, what does is that you have seen the results of a minor fight and am sure you don't want to see it again... your focus needs to be on the future and making sure your old boy is safe always...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Staffords wern't bred to fight, so your herding analogy doesn't work.
    Education not Legislation

  9. #9

    Default

    History:

    The Staffordshire Bull Terrier was developed in England during the 19th century for dog fighting. In order to create a faster and more compact dog breed, Bulldogs were crossed with small Terriers (likely Manchester Terriers and similar breeds). At the time, Bulldogs were large, fierce and intrepid - much different than today's Bulldog.
    Before landing on its current name, Staffords have been called Bull-and-Terrier Dogs, Bulldog Terriers and Old Pit Bull Terriers. Once dog fighting was made illegal in the early 20th century, Staffords became more widely recognized and loyal and affectionate companion dogs.

    The Staffordshire Bull Terrier was brought to the US towards the end of the 19th century, but was not officially recognized by the AKC until 1974.

    Staffords were infact bred to fight... as much as many people might like wish they wern't..

  10. #10

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    KS.. i fully agree with you about our beloved breed. It's well known in general that the SBT's were indeed bred for fighting. I find it rather funny that non SBT folk seem to know all about our breeds past & history.

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