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Thread: Staffies Fighting

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Rural NSW
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    Third cherry, Neuf.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #52

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    4th cherry...

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queanbeyan NSW
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    13

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    I have read all of the posts, some a couple of times. The information has been great and has really got me thinking. I know that out dogs see us as part of the pack and therefore I must maintain the alpha status. I am confident I've achieved this as both dogs listen and obey me. On the rare occasion one or both have been naughty my body language and or voice does the trick. They show they are aware I am not happy by avoiding eye contact, laying down as a sign of submission etc. and after a few minutes approaching to seek attention / acceptance if that makes sense. One comment in particular that's been made about us trying to dictate to the dogs their hierarchy has really hit me and may be part of the problem. Before I owned any SBT's I owned a 9 y/o female Maltese terrier and got my original male staffy at 2 y/o. I never had any problem and when I look back I can see the Maltese was dominant and was never challenged by the Staffie. She passed away 2 year ago and my staffy actually took it hard and pined for her, refusing to eat for a couple of days and searching for her continuously for a couple of weeks. This led to the decision to get the staffy pup and it was a decision i didn't make hastily. I did ring several breeders first to ask about having 2 males and nearly all told me it should be fine. I did a lot of research about the breed before I got my older male so I knew the history of the breed and what to expect so I'm very aware they can do a lot of damage to both people as well as other dogs. I have stopped trying to dictate their order and let them make the decision. This has already shown positive signs as they have stopped competing for attention. On a good note I have been able to bring them together without either dog showing any aggression but this has been a slow process. I have decided get a reputable trainer to visit and assist. I won't be leaving them together unsupervised regardless of the final outcome. I love my boys dearly and will keep working with them at all costs and do what I have to so neither dog will suffer any injury in the future. At the end of the day they are the most loyal, affectionate dogs I can ever remember owning. Its a shame some people judge the breed or have the view they are nothing more than vicious dogs without ever owning one. Thanks so much for the posts and assistance. Kevin

  4. #54
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    A Doberman, Rottwieler or German Shepherd could do a huge amount of damage.
    A pug couldn't.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    The main difference I see with Bully breeds like Staffords as compared to other breeds is their ability to hold.
    Most breeds will bite... Hard, but they then let go and perhaps go for another bite.
    Staffies HOLD and SHAKE causing a lot mare damage then a simple bite ever could. Puncture wounds heal much easier than torn flesh.

    There are other breeds that HOLD such as the Great Dane, much larger and with a bigger bite force in comparison, the difference is, they ONLY hold, they do not shake, they are pre-programed to do as little damage as possible to their prey. Staffies on the other hand, are programmed to rip and tear it apart.

    Breed does play a big part with dog aggression.
    Agree 100%
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I can see why people are filled with angst in another thread now.

    *backs slowly out of thread*
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Queanbeyan NSW
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    Just an update. It's been slow going and a lot of hard work but progress is being made. Using muzzles and suggested techniques plus a lot of reward treats to bring the 2 together again are paying off. Still a lot more work to do but it allows me to keep both of my precious dogs and there have been no further injuries. I know I will never be able to leave them together unsupervised for their safety. I'm really enjoying the time I'm able to spend with the dogs and they love it too plenty of cuddles, praise and I'm being licked to death. I can see how hard they are both trying to please me, how could you not just love them to death. Cheers Kevin.

  8. #58

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    This is really good news for you.
    It has shown that with some dedicated time that you have put in works.
    All the best with them and I only hope that it does get even better.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Tah for the update Stubbies1962

    I'm glad you're making progress.

  10. #60

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    This thread has been an interesting read and honestly it's left me shaking my head given the comments by some supposedly knowledgeable dog people.

    Someone actually said early on in the piece that Staffords weren't bred for fighting? WTF?

    I don't believe that two Staffords can't co-exist without fighting, but every Stafford needs to be assesed individually as to their dog aggression. It is absolutely the responsibility of the owner of a fighting breed(any breed really but in this case ...) to not only train and socialise their dog, but to understand what may trigger them to have a crack at another dog. I know my dog, there is only one trigger(his ball), but knowing that has meant that he hasn't been in a serious scrap in a long time(with dogs he knows and i know the owner of sometimes we let it happen cause i also know my dog is all bluff and noise and what would look nasty to a bystander we know is nothing(never yet have i had to pull jack off) i.e never has he drawn blood - although he has on a couple of occasions had blood drawn on him - its not a good plan for a dog to go a rotty and a gsd when you're only trying to bluff haha)

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