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Thread: Staffies Fighting

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy_07 View Post
    Saying, they're SBTs and should never be trusted together is a cop out.
    I agree with this and that's not what anyone is saying from what I read... but ignoring the fact that both boys are staffords and have now had a fight that required stitches to one of the dog would also be a cop out... the boys should be together as much as possible but with strict supervision... and they should imo not be left alone together...

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    A Doberman, Rottwieler or German Shepherd could do a huge amount of damage.
    Not to the same level as a SBT, certainly not the Doberman. I've seen aggressive Rottys attack very placid staffies (including a family friend's which had never shown any aggression at all in 9 years) and get thoroughly messed up. I certainly don't think staffies can't live together or that they are always going to be a threat, because that's not the case, but these dogs were used for fighting for a reason, and if they do get in a fight it can get ugly. Especially against another staffy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy_07 View Post
    Sure, supervise the dogs. But, just to say, "They're staffies--they'll never get along", in my opinion, is a cop out, without first putting in ALL the effort to keep them from fighting. The first step is desexing, IMO, which probably could have been done earlier.
    I know several people who own two staffies of the same sex that get on fine. It's definitely a cop out, people just need to work on it.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimbastaff View Post
    I do not believe any trainer will be able to help you... As far as the reason the two boys have now had the fight it's not really relevent... once they have had one fight you can be sure others will follow... if you do look to use an outside trainer make sure they understand staffords, they are not the same as other breeds...
    there are plenty of great trainers out there who can definitely help, i myself have helped solve many a problem between staffy 'brothers' and 'sisters'.

    the reason behind the fight is EXTREMELY important. what if the fight was over a bone or a chew toy? the problem is easily solved by removing these items (not saying that is what happened in this case but just an example). you always need to look at WHY something occurred so you can work out a way to solve the problem and get this pack back on track.

    just because there is one fight does NOT mean more will follow. dogs have tiffs all the time, some a little rougher and more violent then others. they are still a family and if you put the work in there is no reason why they can't live like one

    lastly any GOOD trainer should understand each and every breed they work with. each breed is different and unique and a good trainer knows and understands this.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  4. #34

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    I would question why so many breeders are selling staffords of the same sex together firstly.. its should be a rarity rather than common place as your post seems to suggest... and if you read my suggestions I havnt said that outside training won't help... just that they should find one that has some experience with staffords... sure the actual reason for the fight does matter but the original poster doest know the reason and is trying to speculate, that won't help now... two boys can live together in perfect harmony but in my experience with staffords, once they have a fight to the degree that one dog is badly injured (we're not talking about a scuffle here) unless the owner is experienced and the pack leader in every way possible further fighting will occur, and in this case at the expense of an older dog... do you think that's fair... my first priority would be to protect the older dog... it's easy don't leave them alone together... they should still be together when the owner is around as they have always been... and will probably live that way without incident.. but I personally would not risk my older dog... a friend of mine recently had her older stafford killed by her younger dog and they also lived together without ever had a fight until then... it does happen...it's not a one off incident... our breed is certainly capable of it... I just want the poster to be aware...

  5. #35

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    A friend of mine has Staffies and is a very well respected breeder (we are talking bred nearly a dozen Grand Champions) and her kennels have solid, METAL walls between them and the boys are never allowed to even look at each other to avoid problems.
    She has been breeding them nearly as long as I have been alive so if there was an easier (and I'm sure cheaper!) solution, she would have come up with it by now.

  6. #36

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    I have to agree with Kimbastaff here. Disregarding Stafford nature in this situation could be a very dangerous thing indeed. Once individual Staffords have really come to blows they can hold a grudge. Those grudges can sometimes hold until death, as many experienced Stafford owners and breeders have had to learn the hard way.

    Would anyone here overlook a Greyhound's (or any sighthound's) potential for chasing and killing something small and furry that ran in front of it? No. So why would we overlook basic potential temperament traits in other breeds?

    Better safe than sorry. Better to take things into consideration now than regret it later.

    The important thing here is that the OP is asking for help - which is fantastic.

    These boys shouldn't be left together unsupervised - like Kimba suggested.

    An important thing to keep in mind is that the hormones in the young dog can take up to six months to subside after desexing. So give him at least that long to settle.

  7. #37
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    Thanks to everyone for their input. Yes SBT were breed originally to fight and while they are not known to start a fight they will certainly finish it "fight to the death". After witnessing them have 4-5 altercations over the 10 day period and the final one ending with both receiving injuries (the older dog came off second best) I'm very aware of the damage they can inflict. I can only say thank god I was there to break it up as it could have had a tragic ending. I never want to witness them fighting again. I will do what ever it takes to bring them back together again but they will be separated when I'm not home. By nature both are very affectionate and require a lot of human contact and both are very protective of my daughter and I. There were no warning signs before any of the fights that I have detected anyway. On each occasion it just happened in the blink of an eye. Food has never been an issue as they often eat about a metre apart and take "good boy" snacks side by side. I always place the older dogs bowl down first, give him his treat first etc. to show the pup the older dog possess a higher pack status. The only exception to food issues has been when i buy rawhide chews, the older male will take both and growl at the pup if he gets to close. Affection is something they both get lots of but again I acknowledge the older dog first. With other interactions I lead to reinforce that I am "head" of the pack. This problem really has me stumped and i don't want to see either dog suffer injuries. I plan to bring them together tomorrow under controlled conditions to see how that goes. After that I will get a certified trainer with a lot of experience and a good knowledge of SBT to help with the problem. This person may spot the trigger right off the bat and I understand something I am doing may be the trigger I just can't see it. I just want to be a responsible owner and provide both dogs with a safe, loving home environment in which to thrive. Thanks again Kevin

  8. #38
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    Can someone offer any light on this business regarding giving the older dog his food first, and patting the older dog first etc.

    I understand the theory behind it, its to keep the dog the humans think should be more dominant in a more dominant position.

    However, IMO this could just be causing more issues. You might think the older dog shoul dbe dominant, but the fact is, he might not be.

    I would be really interested in others opinions on this type of influence on the dogs behaviours.

    Personally, my dogs bowls are put down at the same time or maybe one slightly before the other. Which ever dog is the first to get to me is the first one that gets pats etc etc. Ive always done this and never had squabbles, maybe the odd snap here and there but that would be it.

  9. #39
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    I have never done this nor had any problems in over 30 years of having different mixes of dogs as an adult.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Can someone offer any light on this business regarding giving the older dog his food first, and patting the older dog first etc.

    I understand the theory behind it, its to keep the dog the humans think should be more dominant in a more dominant position.

    However, IMO this could just be causing more issues. You might think the older dog shoul dbe dominant, but the fact is, he might not be.

    I would be really interested in others opinions on this type of influence on the dogs behaviours.

    Personally, my dogs bowls are put down at the same time or maybe one slightly before the other. Which ever dog is the first to get to me is the first one that gets pats etc etc. Ive always done this and never had squabbles, maybe the odd snap here and there but that would be it.
    And herin I feel Lala hit the proverbial nail. Why set out to create a hierarchy?

    And Crested,all I can say is that in a nutshell I call your 'expert' breeders dogs under/even un socialised.An extremely dangerous thing in any bull breed.
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