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Thread: A Vent About Untrained Labs and Stupid Owners...

  1. #21

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    I think if dogs can't be controlled when off a leash... KEEP THEM ON THE LEASH.
    I have ACD 6 month old pup, now when we go for I walk and there is other people around with or without dogs, I know my dog will definitely want to run up and say hello, and being a pup will get all excited and probably jump on people. Some people are just unsure about strange dogs and i know I get very frustraited when I'm doing the right thing and keeping my dog on the leash and I am the one who gets jumped all over because people can't restain there own dogs.
    Sit, drop & roll!!! So proud of my little man

  2. #22
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    No one minds a dog running around at the beach having fun, but it is up to the owners to make sure they dont jump up uninvited.

    My mothers elderley friend was enjoying a walk on a dog beach with her old dog when a similar thing happened unfortunately as an elderley person she was knocked flying and broke her hip. She had been shouting for the person to call their dog and they did nothing. When she fell, the person grabbed their dog and ran leaving others to call an ambulance and take care of her.

    She has never really recovered and is now terrified of walking her dog on the beach.

    My own elderley mother also gets scared when big strong dogs run at her and has been known to sit down in case she gets knocked over. No old person should have to feel like that when they are out walking their dog. I have at times had to stand in front of her to protect her from such dogs. Their owners dont seem to have a clue what it is like to be old and frail and have a dog running and jumping at you.

    As dog owners we have to respect the rights of other people and allow our dogs to have fun but also to be able to prevent them from causing distress to others.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-10-2011 at 01:15 AM.

  3. #23
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    It's funny how I don't mind a rude lab nearly as much if its dry and not so slobbery.

    There was a couple at the park with two recently shaved SW-F (minus fluff) and a GSP and he was yellnig all the time. He yelled at one of his SW-F when it came back to him and put it back on lead (the dreaded halti) and he yelled and screamed like an axe murdering maniac at any other dog that came near his. And yet his dogs were allowed to approach other people's. Gave this morning's dog walk a decided dark tone. Thank Dog they didn't stay long and most people like that don't come back - because of all the rude dogs rushing up to check out theirs.

    If they had been following proper dog ettiquette, they would have kept their dogs on lead and allowed them to greet all the regular dogs politely before letting their own dogs off lead but no, they didn't do that either. I got the impression they had no idea how to handle themselves at a popular dog off lead walking place.

  4. #24
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    Yes, it is funny.

    I, too, frequent an off-lead beach with the dogs. While, my dogs are usually well-behaved, polite, and recallable, and I'm certainly on-the-ball if they are being pests and need to go back on-lead, they aren't perfect. And, similarly, I don't expect other people's dogs down the beach to be completely perfect, either. In fact, I make a point of wearing fairly crappy clothing down there, because I expect the possibility of being jumped on, rubbed up against, slobbery dogs saying hello to us, and having to run through the surf after the sometimes-still-naughty wolfhound pup I understand the hassle of being covered in wet dog, but I'd also be a) happy to see the wet dog, anyway :P and, b) confident in restraining the dog/calming him/asking the owner to take control of their dog.

    On the other hand, I would be having my own inner rant if someone at our dog park, which is about half and acre, decided to walk in the gate with their dogs on-lead — a sure-fire way to see a fight start in many parks, attended by normal, semi-trained pet dogs, with all the usual dominance, aggression, and insecurity issues that come with them.

  5. #25
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    decided to walk in the gate with their dogs on-lead — a sure-fire way to see a fight start in many parks, attended by normal, semi-trained pet dogs, with all the usual dominance, aggression, and insecurity issues that come with them.
    So what is the person who is still training their dog to recall supposed to do? I don't let my dog off lead until we're in through the gate - or I risk her nicking off and being hard to catch - outside the dog park. I also risk the problem of any dog that takes a sudden dislike to her for any reason at all - or just plays too hard - causing my dog to run away - again - I have an extremely hard time catching her when this happens.

    In my opinion the dog that attacks other dogs *because* they're on lead - is the one that needs retraining and should be kept on lead and out of dog parks or at least muzzled until it stops that behaviour.

    When you let the dog off lead in a new place, that's when you lose control over what happens next. And there are far too many people in fenced dog parks *because* they have no reliable recall or control over their dog.

    Personally I prefer the unfenced dog parks where at least my dog has a chance of escape from an aggressive dog that should never have been off lead in the first place.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy_07 View Post
    Yes, it is funny.

    In fact, I make a point of wearing fairly crappy clothing down there, because I expect the possibility of being jumped on, rubbed up against, slobbery dogs saying hello to us, and having to run through the surf after the sometimes-still-naughty wolfhound pup I understand the hassle of being covered in wet dog, but I'd also be a) happy to see the wet dog, anyway :P and, b) confident in restraining the dog/calming him/asking the owner to take control of their dog.

    On the other hand, I would be having my own inner rant if someone at our dog park, which is about half and acre, decided to walk in the gate with their dogs on-lead — a sure-fire way to see a fight start in many parks, attended by normal, semi-trained pet dogs, with all the usual dominance, aggression, and insecurity issues that come with them.
    Yes all well and good if you are fit and able to push off or restrain a wet slobbery dog. Young kids and old people are not so lucky.

    I dont understand why an on lead dog should cause a problem? When I go to the city and take my dogs to the local dog park near my mothers house there seems to be a mix of on and off lead dogs. Quite a few people including me have our youngsters on lead while we are training them on their recalls and not to jump on people.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    And there are far too many people in fenced dog parks *because* they have no reliable recall or control over their dog.\
    Great point! I 100% agree with you. I, too, have had difficulties with dogs recalling in the past, and am well (and, I mean well) aware of the difficulties in finding the balance to train youngsters in off-lead recall with distractions ie. down at the dog park or beach.

    I get it. I've been there. I'm still there with Wolfie some days. And, I agree with you about the aggressors at the gate being the ones needing to be retrained. But, I'm also realistic. People think they are doing there dogs this great big favour by taking them down the dog park everyday and letting them run, when, in fact, if they aren't able to closely watch their dog's body language, it can also be a serious contributor to some very bad dog behaviour, including aggression and dominance.

    But, if we're realistic about things, that's just the way it is. No matter how good my dog is, and that while he's not a proactively dominant dog, I know that my mastiff will not tolerate other dogs trying to get in his face, space, and dominate him, which is exactly what will happen if I walk them into the gate of the park on-lead, and he's suddenly surrounded by 15 other dogs that see him as the "fresh meat".

    People have dogs for a number of different reasons, and most of them don't have to do with training their dogs to the best of their abilities. Hell, that's not why I have my dogs, either. Although, I'd put money on it being a lot higher on my list of priorities than most, with dogs that are 50kg+ and 60kg+. I'm not really about telling everybody else they're doing it all wrong when we're down the park. I just know what causes fights, and right or wrong, coming through the gate on-lead is reliably one of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    Yes all well and good if you are fit and able to push off or restrain a wet slobbery dog. Young kids and old people are not so lucky.

    I dont understand why an on lead dog should cause a problem? When I go to the city and take my dogs to the local dog park near my mothers house there seems to be a mix of on and off lead dogs. Quite a few people including me have our youngsters on lead while we are training them on their recalls and not to jump on people.
    Yes, good point, also, Kalacreek. But, again, I think that it is realistic to expect there to be a couple of wet, strong, out-of-control dogs on the beach on any given day. If I was going down the beach with my young kids, I'd be inclined to take them to the no-dog part of the beach if I was worried about them getting knocked over, and same goes for Grandma. That said, the story about your friend's grandma breaking her hip is just awful.

    What I said about being on-lead in the park, in my experience, mostly applies to dogs coming through the gate, not so much dogs already in the park that are doing training, which we do regularly, as well, and don't have a problem with.

    I have found it to be a dog balance for the dogs when I do some training with them on the walk down to the park, let them in off-lead and have a good run around for 10-15mins, then back on lead for a bit more training, then another 30-45mins running around with friends.

  8. #28
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    I walk them into the gate of the park on-lead, and he's suddenly surrounded by 15 other dogs that see him as the "fresh meat".
    If you've got the kind of dog that doesn't handle that well, best not to go into the park while there are a lot of other dogs in it. Especially dogs who are regulars and view that park as their own.

    My dog copes really well, but if I see a new dog show up on lead, I call her and put her on lead too so they can greet properly in a controlled way. I also assume any dog on lead at the beach may be dog (or people) aggressive and I usually call my dog back and put her on lead too, and then have a discussion with the other owner about whether it is safe to greet.

    My dog can be great for the dogs who are fear aggressive (I'll get you before you get me), because she will happily do her greeting in the most non threatening way possible, ie upside down. And I can talk the owner through allowing their dog a bit of slack and time to approach or not when they're ready. If that kind of dog knows it has enough slack on the lead to escape or back off if it wants, and that the other dog can't chase - cos it's upside down, they're alot more confident about making friends.

    There are some dogs we can't greet this way. The ones that just want to kill every other dog they see, and the ones that are "too playful" ie have no doggy manners. Though I can talk those owners through only allowing their dog to approach if their dog has enough impulse control to maintain a loose lead ie lead goes tight, dog gets dragged away, lead is loose, dog gets to approach. But in my experience, most of those dogs play way too rough for my dog because they've never had any limits set on them by their puppy mother and siblings or other dogs or their owners. Often happens with big dogs from puppy mills that are adopted out too young, ie at 6 weeks instead of 8 to 12 weeks old.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy_07 View Post
    Yes, good point, also, Kalacreek. But, again, I think that it is realistic to expect there to be a couple of wet, strong, out-of-control dogs on the beach on any given day. If I was going down the beach with my young kids, I'd be inclined to take them to the no-dog part of the beach if I was worried about them getting knocked over, and same goes for Grandma. That said, the story about your friend's grandma breaking her hip is just awful.
    .
    Trouble is what if you have young kids and a dog? I have seen mums and their young children enjoying a stroll on the beach with their dog and also seen them knocked flying by big enthusiastic dogs. My mums local beach is frequented by elderley people and their dogs wanting to walk and keep fit.

    Yes I have seen people turn up to the beach let their dogs off and ignore the havoc they create. One man with a large doberman springs to mind, oblivious of the frightened older folk.

    I think people if they have strong out of control dogs probably need to walk them at low traffic times or do some better training with them. There are plenty of people that make the effort.

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