Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Settling in Question.

  1. #1

    Default Settling in Question.

    Hi Everyone,

    We picked up a gorgeous 5 month old puppy from the pound over the weekend. She is really a affectionate dog that is just happy to be around you and seems to have no desire to run off. We also created a outdoor dog house for her, and our side fence was getting completed the day after we got her - to our amazement she actually got out but luckily just sat at the back door waiting for us! The problem has since been fixed with the dog house.

    My main concern now is the fact that she is such a loving dog that she is very whingy when we leave the house or put her away for the night. Ultimately, we would like to be able to leave the dog house unlocked so she can walk in and out as she pleases overnight. We attempted that last night but all she wanted to do was sit at the back door. Also found that she tends to wait at our side gate aswell, in anticipation for us returning home. This also turns into some whinging and howling of a night - but we never go down to see her while she is like this.

    I just don't want this to turn into some ongoing behavourial problem and would like to see if anyone else has had the same experiences. Is it just her settling into the new home or should we be doing something different to make sure this doesn't become a problem?

    And last but not least, what's the best way to teach a dog not to bark at something. She is quite got but we catch her out a bit of a night and don't want to yell out at her since this can be seen as "joining in". Suggestions would be great.

    Thanks in advance!

    Andrew.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    planet Earth
    Posts
    568

    Default

    [QUOTE=dru;120395]Is it just her settling into the new home or should we be doing something different to make sure this doesn't become a problem?

    It's new environment and the fact that she desn't know to how to be alone. You have to teach her and do it gradually, first for short periods, then longer and longer without too much excitement when coming and going.

    And last but not least, what's the best way to teach a dog not to bark at something.
    Teach her to speak and shush on cue
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, QLD
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi Dru.

    Dog's are social animals. They crave attention. Your departure predicates times of lonliness. What you need to do is slowly densistise her to times of aloneness.

    Start using a slow program of away time. As she is still a puppy, get lots of chew toys and give them to her when she is on her own as well. I would get a kong, or one of those magic cubes where you put her food in it and they will spend half the day trying to get food out of it.

    Make that part of her food earning routine. I have written an article about puppy crying when they are alone over at ezine articles How To Stop Your Puppy Crying When They're Alone

    As far as the barking goes, train the dog to bark on command then use a command for it to be quiet. I have written an article on that too. Visit my website at How To Stop Your Dog Barking-A Short Guide For Dog Owners

    I hope this helps.

    Glen

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •