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Thread: I Got a Couple of Problems....... :/

  1. #1

    Arrow I Got a Couple of Problems....... :/

    Well none of these are major things but it would be nice if someone could tell me the correct way to teach them because it would make life much easier.

    Problem no.1 - Disappearing acts
    I Live on a small property in the country so we have the classic wire paddock fences that are everywhere. dogs can easily come into/ out of a yard and often do (excluding on of my neighbours dogs who has never learnt to put his tail down while going under the fences and always manages to zap himself on the electric fence). I own two dogs ( a 3 year old cattle dog cross named Mollee & a 1 year old english springer spaniel name Ellie). Now Ellie is fine and have never left the boundaries of our yard but mollee on the other hand has. While there is no one at home both dogs are on chains (you will read why later) and when someone is home they are both off. Ellie can be left off her chain unsupervised as long as there is someone at home but Mollee however can't, unless someone is outside with her she is take off. So she is on a 9 meter zip line run across out year while she is unsupervised.

    So i want to be able to leave both dogs off their chains 24 hours a day even when no one is home (or at least have them both off unsupervised). Now i could do that now but i would run risk of mollee A) getting onto the very busy main road near out place like she has done before (though lucky we found her on the side of the road eating road kill, not wandering across it), B) Getting into a fight with other dogs (she is not the best social butterfly) or C) trying to herd our neighbours horse, cows or sheep.

    Currently my mum can not afford to get our yard fenced properly no can we afford the $700 or so dollars to pay for an underground fencing system. I want to be able to reliably teach both Mollee and Ellie to stay within our yard but can't currently think of how.

    Problem no.2 - Herding
    Once again this is about Mollee. We have a rabbit and you guessed it Mollee like to herd him. Now this is not a major issue because the bunny is always in his cage when either dog is off & as the rabbit has grown up with Mollee herding him he isn't worried either. She will stop whatever she is doing to herd him. Well she trys to, a normal situation is
    - Mollee sees the bunny
    - She freezes on the spot, eyeballs and points with her left paw at him like a hunting dog might do (waits for up to a minute like this)
    - she drops lower to the ground like a border collie does and runs up to his cage
    - freezes/ eyeballs/points again
    - when the rabbit doesn't run away she then like a classic cattle dog barks and trys to nip him really fast though his cage
    - and finally she repeats this process over and over agian for ages, usually until she is distracted by Ellie trying to play fight with her but she could go on like this for hours i think the longest time she has so far is 5 or 6.

    I am mainly looking for a way to stop this. I know it is her instincts but it surly can't be healthy to run in circles and herd something that can't run away all day?

    Problem no.3 - Drop it
    As a way to exercise both dogs together i play fetch with them but the problem is neither of them drop the ball once it is caught. I have tried a number of times to teach Molle and she will drop it on command when no other dogs or cats are around (she is very protective of her ball) but as soon as Ellie is involved the best i can get is to get mollee to lay down at my feet and prise her mouth open with my hands and grab the ball (she will only let me or my mum do this, if Ellie tried to take her ball Mollee is bit Ellie very hard and fast on the nose). Ellie on the other hand just gets the ball and runs for her life cause Mollee is always chasing her untill she either drops it or Mollee pins her down to steal it.

    So these are my main problems but other than the running away none of them are major issues but it would be nice if i could get them fixed up.

    Thanks for reading and please help .

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claudia3564 View Post
    Currently my mum can not afford to get our yard fenced properly no can we afford the $700 or so dollars to pay for an underground fencing system. I want to be able to reliably teach both Mollee and Ellie to stay within our yard but can't currently think of how.
    Then keep them chained. It's better than getting killed. Teaching dogs to stay within "invisible fence" is very hard and it's a long process. Dogs do tend to jump fences and escape if they're bored.

    I am mainly looking for a way to stop this. I know it is her instincts but it surly can't be healthy to run in circles and herd something that can't run away all day?
    You have herding breed and that's what they do. I don't see the point of stopping the dog doing something that's in its genes. If you don't like it - get a different breed. Sorry to sound harsh, but it makes no sense to me to have a dog that displays a certain breed specific behavior and to want it to stop. You can probably redirect a behavior to something of equal or greater value, but you will have to find out what it is. Or get a couple of sheep for her to keep her occupied.

    Problem no.3 - Drop it
    As a way to exercise both dogs together i play fetch with them but the problem is neither of them drop the ball once it is caught. I have tried a number of times to teach Molle and she will drop it on command when no other dogs or cats are around (she is very protective of her ball) but as soon as Ellie is involved the best i can get is to get mollee to lay down at my feet and prise her mouth open with my hands and grab the ball (she will only let me or my mum do this, if Ellie tried to take her ball Mollee is bit Ellie very hard and fast on the nose). Ellie on the other hand just gets the ball and runs for her life cause Mollee is always chasing her untill she either drops it or Mollee pins her down to steal it.
    Some dogs are more posesive than others and will not readily give up what they claim as theirs. Either don't put them in a situation where Mollee can hurt Ellie, or try practicing to take and drop things (toys, food, whatever) on command, first just one on one, then when Ellie is around, then practice with Mollee and Ellie at the same time. I can't really describe in writing, sorry.
    Last edited by Fedra; 02-14-2011 at 05:55 PM.
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  3. #3

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    I have sheep & alpacas & can tell you if dogs chase my stock more than once or actully put teeth on them they will be shot on sight & alot of livestock & horse people feel the same. You must keep her home or she will end up shot in a rural farming area.
    I would move your rabbit your dog is a herding breed & I doubt you'd be able to stop it at this stage but really I am most concerned with the wondering. YOU MUST KEEP YOUR DOG HOME.
    Chain it up or spend money on fenecing thats just how it is. I would bring the dog indoors but as it's your mums house you may not be able to do that. Chained up is better than shot & thats what will happen if she keeps chasing stock.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  4. #4

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    Hey there,

    I agree that the priority is to keep your dog under control. I know a guy at our local dog park who owns huskies and they would roam for miles if they were left to escape their yard. He is a very committed and loving owner and he has his four dogs safely chained for up to twelve hours a day, because he has to work. The dogs are used to the routine and they know they will get a couple of hours exercise at night when he comes home. He also sleds them in winter. When he wasn't chaining the dogs up, one of them wandered away at the back of his yard and has never been seen again. Very sad.

    The other option is to build/buy a run, or crate train your dogs so that they can be inside and seperate when you're not home.

    Livestock folk have every right to protect their animals. I had a dog shot many years ago for chasing peacocks up the road because I thought he was not a wanderer. Dogs can be very clever about sneaking off and doing the wrong thing, as that dog was always home when I got back from work and it was only through the neighbours who saw him leave the our property that made me realise (too late) that he was taking off. He never actually approached the peacocks, but even herding behaviour from a distance counts as harassing livestock and could mean being shot or at the very least, dragged off to the pound.

    Good luck with your training efforts when you are home and let us know what happens,

    Cathy.

  5. #5
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    I echo the others. Keep them home, on a chain or run till fencing can be done.
    My 3 ACDs will pack and run off if together and we have sheep on our boundaries with other farmers.
    The farmers have every right to shoot them and ask questions later.
    We built a huge pen encompassing some large jackaranda trees and a garden shed.
    Step 2 was done recently which was enclosing the back yard.
    I am now very much at peace that they can not escape and run off.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #6

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    Well thanks for you answers, i can assure you that Mollee is chained up when unsupervised but i guess i will just look into getting her a longer chain / zip line. I will try what Fedra suggested about dropping and about the rabbit as well.

  7. #7
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    Have you tried on of the electric collars? They are not really electric and have a very low 'buzz' but the dog will respond.

    If you are standing outside and push the button when the dog goes near the fence, you can train it out of goimng near the fence very quickly. I saw a dog once that was chasing cars and was undoubtedly going to get run over - the collar worked after being buzzed once only!

    I know there are people wholey against this method (they prefer positive reinforcement, which I prefer too), but when your dog is in danger of getting killed - then I know what I would prefer.

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