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Thread: Stopping Geoff Jumping On People

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Default Stopping Geoff Jumping On People

    The next exciting episode in the never ending story that is Geoff The Airedale.

    He jumps up on everyone. Quite gently and balanced so you don't take his weight, but with big paws and scratchy claws. I have told the kids to ignore him, don't make eye contact or give him any attention until he has 4 feet on the floor.

    Worst problem is with our 6 year old because he puts his paws on Will's shoulders and they are face to face.

    I'm considering having him with a dragging lead in the house and stepping on it when he goes to jump on Will. Any other suggestions.

    He isn't rough, just big and boofy and a bit overwhelming.

    cheers

    Curly Girl

  2. #2

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    We stopped Shelby (my screen names sake, now deceased) from doing this with a squirty bottle of water. We had a few stashed around the house and every time she did it, she got squirted, she soon didn't like what happened when she jumped and she stopped. Along with squirting, as you have already said you are doing, we would make sure who ever she was trying to jump at, turned their back and ignored her.

  3. #3
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    Maybe I could stand sort of on the periphery with a squirty bottle when he is around Will.

    Just to clarify, I don't leave him alone with the kids, I'm there or he is behind the baby gate, but I need to get a default that is pretty bulletproof.

    The Battersby dogs home say to tell him to sit, but we aren't having much luck with that yet.

    Thanks for the suggestion.

    cheers

    Curly Girl

  4. #4

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    No worries.

    And yep that's exactly how we did it. The bottle wasn't squirted by the person being jumped on, it came from outside the immediate situation by someone else that was around, ie you while he jumping on the lil fella.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
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    Get Will to carry the squirty bottle but take it away from him if he uses it for anything but jumping dog.

    One woman I know uses a pump action bo-oderant bottle with water in it (a travel supply size ie you put your own liquid in it), to stop her lab from humping things it shouldn't. Why it works I have NFI but it does. All she has to do now is get the bottle out of her pocket and he stops.

    Also get Will to practice getting Airedale to sit on approach ie Airedale comes bounding up and gets a big SIT command (and a treat or a pat if he does), and a squirt and ignored (turn your back) if he doesn't.

    I make people get my dog to drop before she gets a treat, because she somehow manages to head butt their hand and their treatbag while she is still sitting - self rewarding when the treats drop out. I also haul her off when she's "begging", however she's so cute most people can't resist her. So I try to make her work very hard for the treats - going through the trick repetoire but mostly aim for drop - because it's hard to jump on people when you're in the down position. And you don't get a treat unless you're dropped.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 10-13-2010 at 04:30 PM.

  6. #6
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    We had a family conference last night and the new rules are:

    No jumping up ever - even when it's cute. (response to jumping - ignore, turn your back and have someone else squirt - thinking Will might get a little water pistol for his pocket)

    Sit is the default for all greetings, collars on and off, pats and attention

    No teeth games (he is very gentle now, but I want to keep it that way)

    Lots of reinforcement for feet on the floor


    I explained this to the kids by saying we know he is gentle, but imagine what a mum would think if he jumped up on a little child. We know he is just wanting to have fun, but that might not be how other people see it.

    This was reinforced to the boys when we took Geoff for a walk a couple of days ago and he was being a perfect gentleman on a loose leash. A little girl ran away from him crying and her mother snatched her up and gave us a dirty look. We hadn't even interacted with the child, she just didn't like the look of Geoff but the mother blamed us for frightening her. Imagine if he had tried to jump up on her.

    Thanks for all you excellent suggestions.

    Regards

    Curly Girl

  7. #7

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    Sounds like a you have a plan that should work and the family certainly seem like they will pull their weight in supporting the plan.

    Good luck, keep us posted on his progress.

  8. #8
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    Good plan curly girl.

    It's not just the little children but old people that big dogs can knock flat and do major damage. Don't let him do zoomies when there is a risk he will crash into people. Do practice recall.

    I had a great one today. My dog was doing zoomies with a friend and they both ran aross the wet cricket pitch - enormous no-no. So I called her, and she came, bringing the other dog with her. Off the cricket pitch. I was so pleased that she'd come in the middle of a doggy game of zoomies.

  9. #9
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    We only aspire to that at the moment.

    We get a good response doing puppy ping pong in the house or yard, but anywhere else, I could be calling him in swahili.

    Still on a lead outside which cuts down the opportunities for zoomies for a little while yet.

    cheers

    Curly Girl

  10. #10
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    Three times a day, when he's already on his way to you, call him "heeyah" or "c'mon" in a sing song tone that you can yell really loudly when you have to... when he comes, give him a piece of yummy roast chicken or mince or uber treat, and try to make it last for thirty seconds (ages and ages), telling him what a clever dog he is. Don't try using this magic sing song word in the park until you've got him reliably turning up when you say it at home for 100 repetitions (or about three months of three times a day).

    instruction - courtesy of Lesley Nelson's "really reliable recall". It's called a conditioned response. and requires ongoing daily practice or it wears off. And must only be used when the dog is already coming (during the training phase).

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