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Thread: Stopping Geoff Jumping On People

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
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    743

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    Zoomies!

    Sorry to hijack, but have not heard the term before and just love it! I could have pressed "thanks" but then you wouldn't have known what for....

    Zoomies....... my new favorite dog word :-)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern Beaches, Sydney
    Posts
    86

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    Because I'm not very experienced with training, I'm using Sue Ailsbey's levels as a training guide.

    At the risk of sounding like a proud Mama, Geoff is very clever, but Airedales don't do things just because you ask.

    At the moment, we are only on level 1 and playing puppy ping pong, which I think is a lesser version of RRR.

    Stand at least 10m away from each other and don't say the C word until the dog offers a return to you. Our target is 100 reps (short sessions) then start asking when he isn't 'in the game'.

    Can I overlay the RRR on top of that, or should I get one sorted and then up the ante for the second?

    Cheers

    Curly Girl

    PS - You have no idea how helpful these conversations have been

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    I think you can do both Curly Girl

    The method I outlined is only part of the recall games that Lesley puts on her DVD. All recall games (my fav is hide and seek), are good for encouraging your dog to come back to you. The conditioned response one I described needs its own special word that you can yell in a panic and be heard over a long way. But you can use the same techniques to use on your regular recall word like "come". Actually my dog will come to anything I say in the sing song tone - her name, the word "custard", "evil hound", "dinner" etc. But it's not as reliable as the "emergency recall word" - the one you condition and use as little as possible.

    So yes, play as many recall games as you like. The idea of the conditioned response is it bypasses the bit of the brain where the dog thinks things like "In a minute, I'm busy". The dog just does it, bypassing the "do I have to" thought. It's like pavlov's dog. Ring the bell, feed. Presently ringing the bell gets you drool... even when there's no food. The dog doesn't think "I'm busy now, I'll drool later".

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Zoomies!

    Sorry to hijack, but have not heard the term before and just love it! I could have pressed "thanks" but then you wouldn't have known what for....

    Zoomies....... my new favorite dog word :-)
    Greyhounds do great zoomies.

  5. #15

    Default Conditioned response

    Hope this clears up the classical conditioning ... there also is instrumental conditioning but that isn't what we are looking at here


    CLASSICAL CONDITIONING

    Classical Conditioning describes the mode of learning in which feelings and involuntary reactions are learnt. The dog has no control over his response.

    CLASSICAL RESPONSE

    If a dog has an automatic response to a stimuli eg., a command or signal, where it does not consciously make the decision to act or not act this can be termed a classical response.

    A prime example of classical response is calling the dogs name it turns and looks at you.It has no reason to look at you but it just cant not do it

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