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Thread: How to Controll a Dog That Barks at Other Dogs on Walks?

  1. #11
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    I started having the same problem as well and called in a trainer. We started the program just a few days ago but basically we're going back to square one. Basic heeling training and lots of focus training under as little distraction as possible. Then we can build it up again. Basically while on walks I keep the focus on me and I will do lots of turns and corners so he HAS to pay attention to me. If I see a distraction like a dog I will avoid it because he's just not ready for that yet.

    Like I said it's been only a few days but there is already some improvement

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussieowner View Post
    i dunno if you watch ceaser milan but, you distract your dog with touch. Touching them on their back leg, using your own leg. Does your dog lead you when you walk? My dog use to lead me when she was a pup and would try and chase birds and walk towards other dogs. Now she is always behind me and does nothing but follow, unless i want to let here wander. The perfect walking dog Also never give dogs treats while on the walk, you may think it distracts them but it rewards there behavior.
    lol yep she does lead me! and try to chase birds!! whne she trys to chase birds i pull on the lead and say leave it.. kinda works.. but not really on other dogs.. im still doing obediance classes but i dont feel it is helping much but it is only early days.. i try teching her heel, but finding really tuff. i walk her on a gentle leader harness just so my arm dosent feel sore after a walk. and no i have never hear of ceaser milan.. sounds very interesting

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loeka View Post
    I started having the same problem as well and called in a trainer. We started the program just a few days ago but basically we're going back to square one. Basic heeling training and lots of focus training under as little distraction as possible. Then we can build it up again. Basically while on walks I keep the focus on me and I will do lots of turns and corners so he HAS to pay attention to me. If I see a distraction like a dog I will avoid it because he's just not ready for that yet.

    Like I said it's been only a few days but there is already some improvement
    im so glad to hear that is helping yeah i avoid dogs on walks as much as i can, like try to be on the opposit footpath.. im to scared to walk past a dog that she may lunge.. im in early days of traing too at a basic obediance class.. boy its tuff because there are heaps of other dogs there, she gets distracted so easerly.. but there letting me train a bit further away frojm the other dogs for the first time tonight.. only my 3rd session i so hope it helps

  4. #14
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    Ive got an arrangemen at my obedience school as well. I can take breaks if he's getting too aroused. Take him away from it and let his mind rest. A non sqeaky toy helps as well. It's hard work, hey? But I figure we reap what we sow so if we put in the effort now, it'll all come back to us in the future. But it's 1 good day and 2 ****e days.

    Good luck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  5. #15
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    Welcome to Cesar Millan's Official Web Site | Cesar Millan - there are some good tips there. Using a short leash helps a lot as you must be leading the dog on the walk. Always be the first one in and out of the door at home otherwise you just told the dog its the leader on the walk. My mum and sister can't walk my dog 'properly' because they don't keep the dog beside them on the walk. I use to use choker chain on my walks, not that i need it anymore, but it is good for corrections. You can put energy into the correction as dogs are very strong in general. Also when walking be calm and don't get worried about other dogs coming towards you and ignore your dog when your walking. If you concentrate on your dog the whole way, your not in control of your own walk.

  6. #16
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    Loeka your obedience school sounds great. I always put the easily over stimulated dogs at the end of the line and tell owners to walk them out the second they start acting up, re-focus and come back in on the edge. Believe it or not towards the end of the 6 weeks course they are leaving less and less and some will even slip in a couple of places next to quiet dogs.

    We always talk of critical distance which is picking a distance from the object of the dogs over excitement or aggression where it is aware of it but still able to respond to instruction from the handler. A distance where it can learn. Over stimulated dogs will not learn.

    I think before anyone handles any type of issue they need to start with good basic obedience. I used to do obedience because I liked trialling now I do it because it's a great way to create a bond and have something to fall back on if a situation arises where you need control.

    Even now I'll cross the road to avoid a pulling straining dog coming towards us as I don't want my dogs to ever be put in a situation where they may feel they need to react as dogs learn from experience.

    If it's a nice relaxed dog coming towards us I'll pull up next to them at a safe distance and ask if their dog is social. That way the dogs are not meeting head on and eyeballing each other.

    I believe in rewarding good behaviour with whatever the dog most desires where ever it is. So if we are out walking and they are all calm and relaxed they will get a reward. If they start to pull or whatever I left about turn and they have to retrace their steps, nothing more boring than going over already travelled ground to a dog.

    There are lots of methods for training a dog, finding the right one for you and your dog is the key.
    Last edited by mouseandchicken; 07-01-2010 at 08:32 AM.

  7. #17

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    I just met this lovely owner (the OP) and her very anxious but beautiful dog and she is NOT ready for group obedience classes.
    After 3 classes they haven't noticed her probable hearing problem and they haven't even been able to get her safe on walks ON lead.
    Cesar Milan is great.. he gives one on one sessions and prepares those dogs before filming by getting them focused on him and submissive to him. In reality it takes more than one 1-1 training session to get such an anxious dog focused on their owner.
    This kelpie needs to be trained to focus on her owner before going to classes.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    Loeka your obedience school sounds great. I always put the easily over stimulated dogs at the end of the line and tell owners to walk them out the second they start acting up, re-focus and come back in on the edge. Believe it or not towards the end of the 6 weeks course they are leaving less and less and some will even slip in a couple of places next to quiet dogs.

    We always talk of critical distance which is picking a distance from the object of the dogs over excitement or aggression where it is aware of it but still able to respond to instruction from the handler. A distance where it can learn. Over stimulated dogs will not learn.

    I think before anyone handles any type of issue they need to start with good basic obedience. I used to do obedience because I liked trialling now I do it because it's a great way to create a bond and have something to fall back on if a situation arises where you need control.

    Even now I'll cross the road to avoid a pulling straining dog coming towards us as I don't want my dogs to ever be put in a situation where they may feel they need to react as dogs learn from experience.

    If it's a nice relaxed dog coming towards us I'll pull up next to them at a safe distance and ask if their dog is social. That way the dogs are not meeting head on and eyeballing each other.

    I believe in rewarding good behaviour with whatever the dog most desires where ever it is. So if we are out walking and they are all calm and relaxed they will get a reward. If they start to pull or whatever I left about turn and they have to retrace their steps, nothing more boring than going over already travelled ground to a dog.

    There are lots of methods for training a dog, finding the right one for you and your dog is the key.
    Thanks, the obedience school is Metro Club in Chermside by the way - just a quick shout out in case anybody googles :P

    Ahhhh and thanks for reminding me to keep an eye out on distance - finding out that critical point where he gets too aroused.

    Speaking of lunging dogs, I've realised many owners haven't got a clue about dogs and while I'm training the dog, they will let their dog rush towards my dog. I'm quite shy so I'm learning how to politely say, "Please back off as my dog is training and I want to keep him focused."

    Same with a jogger the other day! I was TALKING to my dog, trying to keep his focus on me while walking by these joggers that were stretching (I was just going blablablabla GOOD DOG GOOD WATCH blablablablabla and rolling my tongue) when this jogger starts clicking his tongue and reaching out to pat my dog while I'm OBVIOUSLY busy trying to keep him away and focused on me! I didn't want to get narky because I didn't want to get Loeka hyped up but I just curtly said, "Please don't do that" and walked on. But it really got my goat, to speak. Anyway, joggers and dogs in Paddington beware :P

    /end rant

  9. #19
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    HA, I feel for you. I have a large creek next to me and people are always walking there dogs. I train in a large grass area well away from the track and people still find there way across my path and start talking to my dog. Training is made harder when people walk by or talk to your dog because the have a limited concentration periods, after that they are mentally tired. Like yourself though im somewhat shy, but i don't care how I come across any more. Walk in between me and my dogs training and I will let you know about. I try to be as nice as I can about.
    Last edited by aussieowner; 07-02-2010 at 04:10 PM.

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