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Thread: Stopping a Big Dog Jumping Up on People?

  1. #11
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    Thanks MAC!! Oh, training isn't something I'd normally be doing, but CG belongs to my best mate's FIL, he's undergoing chemo which is why she's been in kennels and now here. I am trying to correct the behaviour for his sake, so she doesn't flatten him when she can go home.

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

  2. #12
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    Aww that's really nice of you GAG. Best wishes to the family.

    If she's at your place for a long stay, I might be able to pop over to lend a hand, although I'm waiting to find out if I'm required for Jury Duty. My panel wasn't required today but I have to ring again tonight.

    Glad I missed today given the weather. Hate having to track into town. I'll go just about anywhere else but I hate having to travel into there.

  3. #13
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    Wow thanks MAC, that's a really generous offer, will see how i go, if I'm not seeing any progress in a couple of weeks I will certainly take you up on your offer, CG will be here for probably 2 months, maybe more, so lots of time to get those manners into place! Will be a learning experience for me too, I've never given any kind of formal training to a dog!

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

  4. #14
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    My dog trainer friend told me to walk straight into my dogs if they look like they're about to jump - mixed results so far since Marnie is more of a fan of the sneak attack from the back or side so by the time you know she's jumped on you she's gone already! But she said no knees, you can break a dog's ribs. And don't hold your hands out to stop them, they'll take that as a reward for jumping (free pats!) Failing that, stealth attack with a water squirter

  5. #15
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    I have done the gentle knee in the chest with many dogs for over 30 years, no broken ribs.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    I have done the gentle knee in the chest with many dogs for over 30 years, no broken ribs.
    I guess my concern would be that if a dog is launching himself at you it can be hard to control how gently the knee hits the chest! I'm just regurgitating what I've been told but if it works for you, great. Not going to argue with 30 years of experience to my 1!

  7. #17
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    I do agree about the launching, mine mostly used to jump from a still position so those ones are really a bump as you see it coming. The run and launching ones No.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #18
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    Aug 2009
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    Jumping For Joy | Dog Star Daily

    I like what MaC said about cracking the door and then shutting it again. I do practise that with Frosty. If she says she wants to check the backyard for cats, she must sit at the door and stay sitting until I get it open and tell her "go", otherwise, having said "sit" once, I just stand next to the door and wait. If she stands up when I touch the door, I put my arm back at my side and wait again...

    Ian Dunbar says teach the dog "Sit-Stay". I find the most reliable way to do this is over dinner. Frosty must hold a stay for a measurable amount of time, before she gets to "go" eat her dinner. And I gradually extend the time. But if she breaks - I've made her wait too long and I shorten the time again.

    Paul McGreevy says - make the dog work for affection too or rather a dog will work for affection. Ie if it is behaving unacceptably and you reward it by talking to it, or patting it (pushing it off) etc, you re-inforce the behavior. So one "sit" command and wait, ignore all the jumping (wear protective clothing), until you get a half a second sit, then praise like you found a cure for all cancer. Gradually build up the sit time.

    And be patient, practice a little and often.

    I have been known to stick my knee up when a dog charges me. I'm pretty crap at timing to get a dog in the chest and flip it, but I do find it works very well. But the owners tend to yell at you. I yell at them back that they should not let their 35kg GR jump on people.

    However I find a treat in hand and a sit command works on most dogs, better than the knee chest thing. And it hurts my knee less. Most times, the dog only gets a pat for sit though, which is usually all they wanted.

  9. #19
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    Oct 2009
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    Devonport, Tasmania
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    *DA peeks in for a chuckle @ Grey's*
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