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Thread: Problem with Drop or Down in Heeling

  1. #11
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    just keep practicing.

    drops in trials will be done on grass, so you need to practice for wet grass.

    Having said that I had a client with a dog who would do fabulous drops unless the grass was wet. He would drop but you could always see daylight underneath him in the wet - fail.

    In the end we decided he would only trial on fine days, and in the warmer months. So yet he was withdrawn from the odd trial because of weather.

  2. #12
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    Treats are great to start a dog off but there does come a time when you need to be sure your dog does know the command, which she will have learnt from treats ect. then once you know she knows the command, you need to let her know are in control, not her, that she will drop or there will be a negative correction, this need only be a quick reef on a choker and you need to learn how to do that so as not to harm your dog, and you must to have timing perfect so as not to be ineffective.

    If you continue with treats alone you will get results but only when it suits the dog to want a treat, to have negative things happen for dis-obedience teaches proper obedience, you may need help to discern the diff between being just plain harsh and proper timing to correct and get maximum benefit, even with a small breed it is well worth while to learn.

  3. #13

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    You don't gain or lose points for a slow drop. The judge will only take off points if the dog doesn't drop. Concentrate on getting the drop every time you give the command rather than how "snappy" the dog does it. If you haven't bought the rule book, do so. You'll get heaps of conflicting advice when you talk to people, but if you read the rules & understand them you'll be very clear on what's expected in the ring.

  4. #14
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    I think you can get the rules online.
    Australian National Kennel Council
    you want the obedience ones.

    I've heard stories of judges deliberately steering the team towards the wettest muddiest patch in the arena and then asking for the drop. If you're sneaky, you walk through it and then drop, and maybe lose some points for accuracy. The comp I went to recently, had wet grass and mud patches and the drops were in that.

    Like GSDs4Ever said, slow drops are ok, as long as they happen eventually and you don't "double signal". CCD is not a speed contest. A lot of big dogs have a great deal of physical difficulty with the drop.

    I saw some good bows, ie drops with the front end only in that comp too.

    Frosty would fail the "stays".

    She will drop on anything. Trick is to stop her from rolling over as well.

  5. #15

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    The most important thing to remember is to toilet your dog before you enter the ring. It's a real "trap for young players". I learnt the hard way.

  6. #16
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    The down stay
    The dog is to stay off the lead in the down position until the completion of the exercise.

    Zero Score for a dog which fails to remain in the down position or which moves more than half its body length where it was left.
    Minor deductions for minor movements fidgeting or for a dog that lies down in a position which is commonly known as the dead dog position.

    Minor deductions in the heeling pattern for poor sits, downs, stand, for failing to accompany the handler.

    Anything done quickly and smartly without double handling will improve your score.

    This is for CD, but CCD is very similar. You will still lose minor points for poor sits, downs stand, for occasional guidance with the heel; for the use of more than one command; for failure to carry out any of the lessor points of the exercise. In fact you will lose points for poor performance thru all the classes.

    I find it easier to not let a habit form.
    Last edited by mouseandchicken; 05-06-2010 at 07:11 AM.

  7. #17

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    Another trick for a newbie-make sure you look to see if there is a second page of replies.

    Sorry about that.

    I have the rules and I am feeling a bit more confident with her drops.

    Her stays are great and I can't remember when she last broke. I can walk over her or bounce a ball or anything like that.

    She still lags with her heeling, especially around the figure of 8. My footwork has improved so I am more confident. What I haven't improved on is keeping my speed consistent so any clues on that would be helpful.

    I have rather nervously entered a double trial next Sunday

    I did enter one about 3 weeks ago and we scored 84 but it was a NQ because of her heeling-we scored 14 so I am discouraged. Not sure if we have improved but at least the handler will not die of fright and nerves this time (I hope).

    Thanks again for all your advice and sorry for not replying.

  8. #18
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    Find something that really motivates her. It may be a toy and not food.

    Don't over practice boring heeling, this can kill motivation.

    Look up and focus ahead, be confident that your dog will be right there beside you. Constantly tilting your head to the left checking your dog is up with you can be off-putting to some dogs especially small dogs that lag.

    Pick a point in the distance opposite you, then move your eye to something slightly to the right of that and walk towards it. Often we walk into our dogs and this can be off putting.

    Only reward when the dog is right up beside you, ignore lagging. Correcting lagging IMO doesn't work. Which is why I like a dog that pulls as apposed to lags.

    For the figure of 8 practice speed up when your dog is on the outside and slow down when your dog is on the inside is the general rule, for you I'd only do the speed up (walk faster encouraging dog to keep with you).

    Don't do too much off lead training, being on lead is still the best training tool.

    When I was trialing I would practice each evening doing a basic run thru and then make my last practice on a Wednesday night. Leaving the dog fresh and wanting to work come Saturday.

    I also didn't over practice the dog just before I went in the ring, only doing about a 30 second heel and a couple of sits, then sat down on my chair and awaited my turn.

    This suited my dog.

  9. #19

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    I will try this. I think I tend to slow down as Cindy lags which adds to the problem. I also think I stride and need to keep my speed up but use shorter steps.

  10. #20

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    Well sorry about the delay in posting results but...
    First trial we failed heeling. I was disappointed because I thought that we had done well. Cindy dropped well (for her) but I think I was varying my speed too much. She lost no other points apart from 1 pt on recall for a crooked sit. If only we could heel.
    The pm trial was a disaster. She lagged a full lead length and I couldn't work out what was wrong. She was not a happy camper.
    Turns out she was bitten by a spider (we think) and so has been to the vet and on anti biotics. She is sort of energetic today. Poor baby. After the vet she did not talk to me all day. 2 injections = bad mum

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