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Thread: Banjos Naughtiest Act Yet.

  1. #11
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    Basically (in a roundabout way) what you are doing. Make sure when you feed him Banjo sits, focuses on you not the food, and is given a yes on total focus, followed by a release word like "okay" before he is allowed to eat.

    Mind you, if Banjo was my dog I wouldn't even be feeding him that way. I'd be making the little bugger sit patiently and calmly, and feeding him every last morsel by hand. Every scrap of food that goes into his gob would be coming literally from me.

  2. #12
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    What sort of training establishment are you taking him to? How has he gone with that so far?

  3. #13
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    ok, will do that as well...
    Taking him to the SA obedience club. He hasnt exactly started yet- He had kennell cough for ages after getting him- the vet advised to wait a couple of weeks after the cough went away to ensure he was contagous before taking him. Took him last tuesday to sign him up and did an orientation talk. They asked us to come back not tonight but next tuesday as they are all full up at the moment...

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz & Banjo View Post
    :-S
    Ok so not on the bed or couch at all.

    um well if biting means actually putting pressure with his mouth and hurting me sometimes and grabbing on to my clothes and trying to rip and growling then yeah.. I dont think he is doing it TO hurt me though. I think he is just playing and thinks it a game?
    No bed, no couch, nothing! Zilch. He can lie on the floor or a rug for as long as it takes till he learns how to behave, and is taught what is expected of him.

    Well, if he is playing he just sees you as another litter mate to muck around with. That is dangerous, so you must change things asap.

    You could try the water bottle. Sometimes with a firm "NO" the voice doesn't quite come out with the autority the dog needs to realise it's not a game. Hence why Banjo just keeps going with you and the loud no is not working.

    I'd have flattened him in one of two ways, but there's no way on earth I'm gonna suggest you try and do any of those options. Sorry.

    With the mouthing/biting, if you stand still and fold your arms across your chest and stand side on, does he stop? Contrary to popular belief, this method does NOT stop all dogs in their tracks, unfortunately.

  5. #15
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    if I stand still and fold my arms he bites my legs or my dress or jumps up my back. :-S
    yes I am going to put my foot down from now on. I can see is is getting very nessarcary.
    hmm perhaps I need to know these flattening options? haha if in a years time things are still not going well I may demand to know.

  6. #16
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    Have you tried clamping his mouth together? And I do mean seriously, no shyness or pussy-footing around.

  7. #17
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    Hi DA

    She's going to SAODC, my dog school. Will teach heel and sit and stuff like that but will only deal with the in home issues if you ask.

    B&J

    Ask your instructor, ask Rob (Chief instructor) or if you want some really creative answers, find Pin Needham (club president, vet and wise person, seen often with a one eyed brown lab) for some ideas. He will probably tell you to scold the bed and the couch loudly and belt them with the newspaper and tell them what bad bad couch / bed they are. In front of your dog. Effect is interesting, should keep dog away/off.

    Think you need to be really firm and consistent. You have your rules, don't make exceptions.

    At training, in that last five minutes, ask questions, start with your most urgent problem. Write a list of questions if you forget stuff or get flustered.

    Be patient.

    Pick one thing first and really focus on that. For now, I'd start with the biting.

    Biting you.

    First bite, yelp, ow, bah,
    and turn your back on dog and ignore, no eye contact, no chat for 3 seconds.

    Second bite, all that for first bite, and squirt bottle instead of ignore.

    Third bite, yelp, bah, time out/apart from you, shut in laundry, outside, in crate - whatever works. Start with five minutes. Don't talk to him or look at him for this time. After five minutes, only let him out when he's calm and not whining or barking. Look for a one second or two second break to start with - long enough for you to say "good dog".

    Jumping on people. Pretty much as for biting.
    When I first had guests, I put Frosty on lead and made her sit or drop, before the guests were allowed to greet her or she greet them. And they had to approach her, not the other way. I used the lead to limit her opportunity to jump. You have to pay attention or they will sneak a jump in.

    If jumping persists, out to the crate. This isn't so much for punishment, you don't scold the dog. You just need a break so you can have a normal conversation and get on with what you're doing.

    Dog aggression, turn him around and walk him away from the other dog the minute he starts growling/barking. Watch for the hackles. Hackles don't always get followed up by an attack but they are your first warning. If he settles - then try approaching again. If he's going for everything, don't let him approach any dogs, just wait it out. Tell him he's good and treat him if he settles at all, even for just a second. Try being on the edge of the group and block his view, reward him if he looks at you instead of hackling at the other dogs. Teach him "leave it". Dog club instructors will help you with that.

    Frosty is pretty good at "leave it". Use the lead to enforce and treat to reward attention back on you.

    Climbing on top of you when you're eating
    - crate before you sit down with your dinner. Let him out when you're finished. After dinner, set up a small plate of food you don't care about going cold and practice getting some space, ie let him come with you, when he jumps up, you stand up and move at him, if he's not on the couch until he backs off, then sit down, and repeat as often as it takes. Remember you've had your dinner, this is practice. If he jumps up on your couch, try using a chair he doesn't fit on. If he jumps on you, stand up, let him fall off, walk at him till he's where you want him.

    Some people teach their dog "on the mat" or "in your basket" and it's the same as teaching children the naughty corner. Just keep putting the dog back, tell it "good dog" if it stays for a second, keep saying "good dog" for as long as it stays, and as soon as it's off, put it back. You're not going to get to eat anything in this process until he's learnt it, so don't try.

    Be patient.

    Pick one thing first and really focus on that. For now, I'd start with the biting. And I'd lock him away from you while you eat dinner or have guests.

    Triangle of temptation. For doggy dinner time.
    starting point.
    Make him sit and stay/wait until the dinner bowl is on the ground in front of him, then give him a word for "permission to eat". For Frosty she gets a release word eg "free" or "go" like you use at training, and "on special" for ok to eat.

    Gradually extend the time he has to wait, sitting before he can start eating his dinner. If he breaks, put him back and make him wait about five seconds and then release him "good dog" and all. The idea is to help him get it right, so if he breaks, your stay time was slightly too long, so dial it back for the next few feeds.

    Reward him with play. Have you got a tug toy you can play with him? After dinner when he's good in the crate, you could reward him with play with tug toy. It gives him something else to bite that is ok too.

    And did I say before "be patient".

    about when to start. Last Tuesday in the month is "Graduation" so excitable dogs that haven't had much practice can be a big distraction for other dogs in the class. By the time you get to grade five or competition class, it should count as good "distraction proofing" aka "proofing", but in grades 1 through 3, disruptive dogs, late arrivals on graduation day are not very popular.

    You never know how many people are going to show up on any given night, but starting on the first Tuesday of the month is a great idea. Do pay attention to the weather. If it's stinking hot, violently stormy, or really really wet or been flooding, training is likely to be cancelled. You can ring Rob's number in the newsletter about an hour before class starts to check. And check the bom.gov.au for forecasts and rain radars, is a big wet patch headed towards the South Parklands, training might get washed out.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 04-27-2010 at 01:16 PM. Reason: PS graduation stuff

  8. #18
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    he has a kind of short muzzle that is hard to grab... and he moves quickly. I would do it when I could but not sure I would get the oppertunity that often..
    not making excuses but when I have tried it it just hasnt work... maybe I am being to soft i dont know

  9. #19
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    I've had a read thru your other posts now.

    Like DA, all furniture and bedding is now off limits. I didn't realise the extent of the problems you're having with him.

    Be prepared that you will not watch TV or sit down for a while as you will be concentrating on Banjo. Body block him from the furniture etc. Make sure he is always wearing a fixed collar so that you can remove him from furniture, calmly and quietly - just say no, or get off or whatever you want, never hesitate, but don't get emotional about it either.

    I like the stand completely still with jumping and biting dogs, it takes repetition. Absolutely no reaction at all, not anger, frustration or fear; just nothing. I'd go back inside and leave him out, or put him outside if he did it to you inside the house. But I find the best thing the total lack of response.

    Most of your interaction with this dog will now be training, well that's what I'd do.

    Best of luck with it all. Don't be afraid to hang around after class and ask your instructor with some help with these problems and see what they suggest as they will have seen Banjo "in the flesh" so to speak.

    And lastly he hasn't been with you all that long. Like a lot of people with a rescue dog I'm going to take a guess and say you felt sorry for him, he got a lot of attention & love and he's taken that the same way a lot of dogs do and just kind of taken over.

    You'll sort him out.

  10. #20
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    Well you really have to get it under control, as you know. Lol.

    I honestly feel that a lot of (not all) Banjo's behaviour comes from his idea that he can do whatever he likes.

    You need to get serious. Don't mean that in any kind of offensive way. What I mean is however serious you've been up till now, get REALLY serious.

    Thanks for that Hy. B&J, try getting some help from the club. Pick a trainer that you seem to have a good rapport with, and who's training ideas you feel comfortable with.

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