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Thread: Dog Walking Problem

  1. #41
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    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by allbreeds View Post
    Your dog needs to be trained.It takes about 30 mins or less to get a dog to stop pulling.Persistance and the right training aid.Dont dilly dally with a harness use a tool which will correct the dog properly so it doesnt pull.Its the owners fault the dog pulls not the dogs...
    And no desexing doesnt help ,,actually doesnt help much at all
    And how do you suggest the OP trains his dog? Any suggestions?

    As a fellow Kelpie owner, I can feel your pain. My girl was the WORST puller and on top of that, she was dog aggressive so can you imagine we would walk past other dogs I hated walking her, and we all know if theres one thing a kelpie needs, its exercise.
    I can happily say, she is a beautiful 'heeler' now


    With a lose lead, hold a treat by your side where you want him to be walking. Say a clear, firm 'heel' and walk say, a metre with the treat in front of him, so thats what he's concentrating on. Stop and praise and then continue another metre.
    This should be part of his training, not carried out when you are doing normal walking, so keep it to 5-10 minutes. A Kelpie/BC etc. can usually stay 100% concentrating for about 8 minutes.
    In the mean time, a gentle leader, if used properly, can be quite effective, just to make it easier for you. But please do the training, as a GL isn't incredibly comfortable for the dog.
    Education not Legislation

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Brunswick (Melbourne)
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    5

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    Quote Originally Posted by allbreeds View Post
    Your dog needs to be trained.It takes about 30 mins or less to get a dog to stop pulling.Persistance and the right training aid.Dont dilly dally with a harness use a tool which will correct the dog properly so it doesnt pull.Its the owners fault the dog pulls not the dogs...
    And no desexing doesnt help ,,actually doesnt help much at all
    Training is all good and well, but theory doesn't always apply to real life and to all dogs, especially those with a high drive.. sure you can teach a dog to heal and walk properly in 30 mins in the back yard with some nice treats (I trained mine that at 10 weeks). Take that same 1 yo kelpie out the front gate and heading for it's favorite park and it's another story, and has nothing to do with obedience. My kelpie is very well trained and obedient, and will 'heal', 'slow down', 'stay behind', 'sit' and 'wait' on verbal or visual command on walks both on and off lead AFTER the park.. on the way there her attention span is simply too consumed by anticipation to comply for more than a few seconds, even though I ALWAYS stop when she pulls and she ALWAYs returns to heal.

    Aside from that some dogs never pull, some do... training isn't everything. Ever seen a person walk down the street with 2 or more dogs, with one that pulls? Same owner, same training, different dogs. If you are the lucky owner of a dog that never pulls, that's great, but I'm afraid some of the credit has to go to the dog.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by bombadda View Post
    Training is all good and well, but theory doesn't always apply to real life and to all dogs, especially those with a high drive.. sure you can teach a dog to heal and walk properly in 30 mins in the back yard with some nice treats (I trained mine that at 10 weeks). Take that same 1 yo kelpie out the front gate and heading for it's favorite park and it's another story, and has nothing to do with obedience. My kelpie is very well trained and obedient, and will 'heal', 'slow down', 'stay behind', 'sit' and 'wait' on verbal or visual command on walks both on and off lead AFTER the park.. on the way there her attention span is simply too consumed by anticipation to comply for more than a few seconds, even though I ALWAYS stop when she pulls and she ALWAYs returns to heal.

    Aside from that some dogs never pull, some do... training isn't everything. Ever seen a person walk down the street with 2 or more dogs, with one that pulls? Same owner, same training, different dogs. If you are the lucky owner of a dog that never pulls, that's great, but I'm afraid some of the credit has to go to the dog.
    Great comments bombadda - mine is definately in this category! Well behaved at home, but the walk is another story.

    aussiemyf7 - thankyou for the training tip - I think that may be some of the problem - I'm trying to get my dog to walk well on our walks (not seperate training sessions).
    The other issue is food as a lure does not always work. For instance, if the dog is not doing the correct thing, a treat is not given - which leads to the dog ignoring the treat as he thinks he is not getting it. However I may retract this statement as with short few minute training sessions, the dogs frustrations may be minimal.

    Thanks again for your help.

  4. #44

    Default Its not theory its training

    Quote Originally Posted by bombadda View Post
    Training is all good and well, but theory doesn't always apply to real life and to all dogs, especially those with a high drive.. sure you can teach a dog to heal and walk properly in 30 mins in the back yard with some nice treats (I trained mine that at 10 weeks). Take that same 1 yo kelpie out the front gate and heading for it's favorite park and it's another story, and has nothing to do with obedience. My kelpie is very well trained and obedient, and will 'heal', 'slow down', 'stay behind', 'sit' and 'wait' on verbal or visual command on walks both on and off lead AFTER the park.. on the way there her attention span is simply too consumed by anticipation to comply for more than a few seconds, even though I ALWAYS stop when she pulls and she ALWAYs returns to heal.

    Aside from that some dogs never pull, some do... training isn't everything. Ever seen a person walk down the street with 2 or more dogs, with one that pulls? Same owner, same training, different dogs. If you are the lucky owner of a dog that never pulls, that's great, but I'm afraid some of the credit has to go to the dog.
    Every thing has to do with obedience.What you are saying and many others are excuses for lack of or bad training obedience.A dog pulls because you let it pull.A dog doesnt pull when its tied to a tree..The only difference is the tree doesnt move where as the owner does.
    Blaming the dog breed or just the dog is a cheap way out.Correct the dog,let it know its not suppose to be pulling.A series of proper corrections when it does pull will soon stop the pulling.
    I have yet to see a dog that will pull and not heel after being trained properly.
    Its one of the way you can tell a dog isnt trained.if it doesnt do what YOU want it to do it isnt trained properly.

    Mabye one of the problems also is that you mention 30 mins training in the back yard.Why not train it where there are distractions like in the park ?or when you talk it for a walk.Getting a dog to deal with distractions is one of the best things you can do to help it.
    Last edited by allbreeds; 08-23-2010 at 01:33 AM. Reason: to add comments

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonathon View Post
    ok, just went for another unsuccessful walk - I'm at the point were I do not enjoy going for a walk as the constant pulling is tiresome (shoulder aches too!)

    It seems every method is excellent - for a week or two, then he ignores the discomfort and pulls again!
    I have two Dobes. Two headstrong, prey-drivey, STRONG Dobes. I'm not exactly small, but you can imagine this was not making walking fun at all. I used a professional program purchased through Steve @ K9... hopefully I can explain it briefly without overstepping the boundaries: I trained each dog separately with a command which meant "do not pull on the leash". I use "easy". Others use "slow", or "close" or "with me", the command does not matter. The method does require you to correct the dog, though, so if you prefer purely positive methods, this one is not for you!! Essentially the dogs started in a really, really low distraction area (my backyard) and were taught that they had to walk on lead (at varying lengths selected at random by me), and the minute the leash went tight, there was a correction ("Ah-Ah" or a check on the chain whichever form of correction you use) simultaneously with a 90 degree turn by me and I'd walk off in the other direction and the dog had to catch up. When the dog came up to my side again, praise and encouragement. Once I got to a point where there was no pulling at any length in the yard, we moved to the front yard. Then the street. Then down the street. Then out to new streets. Each time, the dog leaned with slowly increasing distraction levels that the command applied- pull on the lead = correction, keep lead loose = praise and walk keeps going (ie HUGE reward). My dogs now think I am the sneakiest bugger on the planet and they keep their eyes on me and their ears attuned to my footsteps to avoid being tricked by me going in another, unexpected direction! The other thing I did at the same time was to up my leadership by choosing where my male dog (second in command in our pack) pees. Don't laugh, but as the pack leader, I would normally be the dog marking, right? But, because I was NOT going to pee on trees (I'm a GIRL!!!), I started choosing where he peed- a few meters great loose leash walking resulted in being given leeway to go to a tree or bush or whatever and sniff and pee to his heart's content. If he chose to go do it withou my say so, check, turn and off in a different direction. Compliance gave reward and very quickly I'd see him swivelling his eyes up to me as if to say "can I go sniff there?"...

    This is quite a lot of work, but it is well worth it, IMO. You do definitely need to be able to ignore people odd stares as you walk up and down the street randomly, but hey, people staring at the dog hauling you down the street is not much different.

    If that helps at all, or sounds interesting/ useful, check out Steve's webpage, or send him an email and he can talk about the program with you. It's got alot more details than I gave here. I don't want to sound like an advert, but the cost of the program compared to the support and help you get, it is quite cheap and I have found it very effective. Not only that, the program is tailored to you and your dog- what I did may not suit you and your dog perfectly. Yes, my dogs still have the occasional "whoopsie" but our walks are much, much much more enjoyable now. Now I have to teach them to do it under the highest distraction of all- together!!

  6. #46

    Thumbs up

    Thanks Villain & Flirtt excellent response, with useful examples of what to try!

    I've been doing the change of direction lately, up and down the street - takes ages to walk 500m!!
    I too make the decisions to pee - think it helps (I might not look so strange peeing on a tree - still not going to try it in public - ha ha). I might check out Steve's site too!

    Thanks again
    Last edited by jonathon; 09-13-2010 at 03:07 PM.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by allbreeds View Post
    A dog doesnt pull when its tied to a tree..
    I have one that does! She will pull if she is tied to anything, she's convinced she can find a rabbit around here somewhere.. no matter where she is... It's always there, just...out...of...reach

  8. #48

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    Hey dude, this used to happen to me. When your dogs start pulling the lead insted of pulling them back just stand there insted n see what happens

  9. #49

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    Failing that theres some good books out there, if anyone knows any could you suggest some for me plz?, Dog Training Masters Home Study Course looked up dog walking in youtube and someone had a review for that book, seemed to work for them, but idk, probs no different that a high quality library book

  10. #50

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    Hey guys,

    great discussion. I agree that the whole stopping/changing direction thing is useful, as well as mild corrections with a verbal command. As time consuming as it is, it's been worth it for me. The litmus test for me has been my ten year old daughter. I thought I had my big dog trained not to pull, until she walked him and I saw that he was still very capable of doing the wrong thing. We did use a Halti for safety when she was walking him, but now I am helping her to feel when he is 'leaning' in prepartion to pull and the stopping/change direction method is also another good strategy for her to use. I am always there for back-up for her, but I think the dog having to heel with her as well as with me has been really useful in reinforcing hat we want from the dog. I stopped using the Halti due to concerns over it twisting the dog's neck - apparently this can happen even with a 'gentle' correction' and as someone else pointed out, many dogs don't really enjoy the feel of harnesses and headcollars. This dog works his way up to a pull, but if I can address it when it's just a 'lean' on the lead, it works better. I would never agree with yanking, or harsh pulling on the lead, btw.

    Nothing's black and white - I sympathise with those owners who's dogs have a high drive to pull and it's not really helpful to make negative comments when you can't see what is happening in reality. Dog training is a learning curve for most of us mortals and everyone on here who has posted sounds pretty dedicated to doing the best for their dogs. I personally have found little lasting success with harnesses and head-collars - I don't think they truly train a dog to stop pulling. Having said that, perhaps for the owner who is in the interim, it's a better option than the dog strangling itself while dragging it's owner's weight along?

    Steve has had some very interesting comments on another thread on here about training to walk without pulling and the use of harnesses/head-collars.

    Cathy.

    P.S - It's funny - I work in a riding school and ride many types of horses during the time they are being assessed as suitable mounts. Many people poo-poo the idea of martingales and various 'tools' used for addressing negative behaviour in horses - while I agree with the principle of sticking to basics, I have also ridden horses who are much better with a martingale or a particular bit - without extensive re-training, these horses would be out of control to ride and I have been very grateful for different 'tools' in the meantime. At least I can train my own dogs and horses they way I want, lol.

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