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Thread: Tricks You Can Train Your Dog To Do At Home

  1. #1
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    Default Tricks You Can Train Your Dog To Do At Home

    Hey Everyone,

    I have a plethora of tricks that I've written down instructions on how to teach a dog them here and I thought that there are a lot of people who might enjoy them. I'll also include things like tips to get a great recall etc

    These are positive only methods, work brilliantly with a clicker, but if you don't have a clicker simply condition the word "Yes" or a similar one syllable word to mean "That's right, here's a treat.

    Anyway, to start with I thought I'd write out how to charge a bridge word I know that a lot of our experienced members already know this, but I thought it would help a lot of our new puppy owners and new members

    Next Post will be about charging, then I'll put up teaching to "Wait at the Door".

    I will add to the contents here as I add posts

    ETA: Contents

    1. Charging Your Voice or a Clicker
    2. Wait At The Door
    3. Roll Over
    4. Speak/Quiet On Command
    5. Spin
    Last edited by Angela's Gone Batty; 03-26-2010 at 04:39 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Charging A Clicker or Your Voice

    To 'charge' a clicker or your voice is a very simple exercise. When I say click your clicker, if you do not have one, say your word instead

    Step 1: Have your clicker in your hand, a pile or container of treats with you out of reach of the dog. Make sure you are in a quiet area with minimal distraction at first.

    Step 2: Click your clicker, then deliver your treat. Now there are some people who say click the clicker as you deliver the treat, some who say to click the clicker then immediately give the treat and others who say click then pause a moment, then give the treat. How you do it is up to you - For Batty I clicked then gave the treat immediately.

    Step 3: Repeat about 30 times. When you have done this a few times you may notice the dog startle, look to your hand or look at you at the sound. This is a good thing as it means the association is being successfully built between the click and the treat.

    That's it, simple hey?

  3. #3
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    Default The Wait At The Door Game

    This is something that all dogs really should know. That way you don't have to worry about being bowled over by your dog every time you open the door

    The key to this one is consistency. NEVER let the dog exit before you, make it a habit for him to either sit or stand and wait for you to go out first before giving the ok for your dog to follow. This game will also help with visitors if you practice it when people visit you too.

    Step 1: Move forward, with the dog leashed at your side towards the closed door.

    Step 2: Hold your hand flat with the palm facing the dog and slow down. Click and treat for your dog slowing down to a stop before reaching the door. If the dog rushes for the door simply turn, walk away and start again. Do not correct the dog at this stage.

    Step 3: When the dog is stopping each time, put your hand out and reach for the door. If the dog moves, turn around, walk away and start again.

    Step 4: Work towards turning the door handle just a bit each time, clicking and treating for the dog staying put and not rushing toward the door.

    Step 5: Start to open the door just one inch, then two, then three etc. Work towards this very incrementally, make sure you set up your dog for success! A reward for the right behavior is a better reinforcement than a correction or walking away.

    Step 6: Eventually begin moving through the doorway, while the dog waits in the position as you left him, then calmly give him the ok to move.

    With Batty I actually had to teach him to slowly come out the door as well, as he would wait there until I gave him the ok then race out as fast as his legs could carry him

    Step 7: If you have the same problem as I have just described, it is simple to fix. I wound up luring Batty out calmly, rewarding the walking, not the running. I also started doing this when he was very tired or had just woken up and was still sleepy.

  4. #4
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    Default

    great post

  5. #5
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    Yep, am watching and reading it all.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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    Default Roll Over

    Dog must be off lead, in a distraction free environment.

    Step 1: Ask your dog to Drop

    Step 2: Get some yummy food and slowly move the food from the dogs nose towards his hips. His nose should follow the treat and he should start turning his head to follow too. You may need to be on your hands and knees for this.

    Step 3: Once his head is heading towards his hips, move your hand over his back, toward the ground luring him into a full roll.

    Step 4: Once you have done this at least 4 or 5 times successfully, add in your cue word. I use "Roll". The dog may still be confused and only go part way. Keep practising and make the sessions short and fun. I say Roll as Batty is rolling as the cue needs to be linked to the behavior before being used independently as a command.

    Step 5: Gradually phase out the food lure, until the dog doesn't get the food until completing the roll. The way that I did this was to hold the treat I was luring with in my right hand, luring him into the roll but the treat he actually got was in my left hand. This way he was following the smell in my right but didn't assume that that is where the treat was.

    Extras

    Try Multiple rolls, and rolls in the opposite direction (same method, just going from left to right instead of right to left)

    You can also have your dog drop beside you and teach him to roll underneath you so that you have to jump as he goes under. Be careful with this though, it hurts when you fall!!

  7. #7
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    Default

    Great posts. What about for dogs that aren't food driven?

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    Default Teach Your Dog To Speak

    Also known as Bark on Command

    There are a few different methods for this. This is great to teach a nuisance barker This way they will bark on command instead of at random! Of course, this doesn't work for every dog!

    This one can be a little elusive for quiet dogs as well.

    Try enticing your dog to bark. If he will groan or grunt, click and treat for this and wait for him to get louder and louder, only rewarding the louder noises. You may have to wait a little bit for him to make the noises again.

    You can capture this by clicking and treating when the dog barks, then waiting for him to offer the behavior again.

    Then add the cue word of your choice, I use "Talk To Me" but you can use speak, bark, talk, noise anything really. Also add the hand signal at this point. I use my hand in a 'beak' shape opening and closing.

    Remember to generalise this trick as some dogs won't always do this in a new place.

    Down Sides!!!

    Once the dog is reliably barking on command - usually between 30 and 50 repeats of the same trick, sometimes longer depending on the dog - NEVER EVER reward the dog for barking when you haven't asked for it!! You will create a dog that barks to get what he wants.

    Extras

    Teach your dog to count!

    Teach your dog to bark Once when you hold up One finger, twice when you hold up two, three times when you hold up three etc. Simply replace the hand signal for bark with the number of fingers. You can have both signals too.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    yep...how do we do this for a dog that could not care less about tucker?
    I'll put up the ones for teaching with toys shortly. I've only got my food notebook here, the toy one is in the cupboard

    Hey Cleas, you shouldn't have that problem though!! You have garbage guts dogs Mine's one too!!

  10. #10
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    Default Quiet On Command

    To teach after teaching Speak - Or Before too

    Step 1: Choose one simple word for the quiet command. This word should also be easy to remember and used consistently. I use "Shush" (pronounced Shoosh) but other common ones are "enough," "quiet," or "hush."

    Step 2: If your dog barks without warning or command, briefly acknowledge it by checking for the source (look out the window or door, go to your dog). Then, get his attention with a clap, whistle or similar sound.

    Step 3: Immediately after the barking stops, say your quiet command in a firm, audible and upbeat voice while giving a treat.

    Step 4: Practice the "quiet" command frequently. You can do this anytime he barks, but keep sessions brief.

    Alternate Method:

    Once he has gotten the hang of speak, you can then teach quiet. This is the method I use.

    Step 1: Ask your dog to speak, click and treat. Then cue for quiet, I use a closed fist held up for this one. I got a blank look and silence in response to it and clicked & treated that.

    Step 2: Repeat this about 5 or 6 times before adding in the cue word (I use "Shush" as mentioned above).

    Step 3: Repeat again using both the verbal and visual cues around 30 times.

    If anyone has anything to add to this one I'd be grateful This is what worked for me.

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