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Thread: Clicker Training - Just Sharing a Good Experience

  1. #1
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    Smile Clicker Training - Just Sharing a Good Experience

    3 words: It. Is. Fascinating.

    I keep saying that I've learn more in the past month and half than in the past 3 years but it's true! Even though I've never had dogs before, I always said I wanted a reliably trained dog so the moment we adopted Loeka, I pretty much got started on the basics. And I also started on TOT and NILIF (once Loeka understood sit, of course). And I love training him!

    BUT I'm a total newbie. It was going well but I still felt like I wasn't communicating well what I wanted. I had read about Clicker Training but I thought it would be too difficult or too confusing. But I decided to give it a go and wow. It is amazing - he focuses more on us, his reactions to cues are faster, there is less focus on food because of the lack of luring, etc etc and overall it seems more intuitive. I wish I had known about this before!

    Like I said, I'm not a dog trainer by any means but really this seems to be working for me. So YAY! Now if only he would stop using us as a chewtoy, he would be perfect ; )

    So if anyone else has experience or tips with clicker training, please share! I'd love to hear how you train/trained your puppies!

  2. #2
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    Been using conditioned reinforcers for years now. I like the word yes but whatever works for the individual.

    In my puppy classes I do target stick work so that people can get their timing right. I also get out a stack of pretend $50 notes and ask people to touch from the toes, knees, hips, nose, head, hands in air & keep repeating it. I pick one thing, keep it to myself, say knees and bridge each time they touch their knees after a few goes people get the gist of it and leave their hands on their knees.

    What I've taught so far to my dogs apart from the usual basic stuff is:
    Pushing dolls pram
    Spins
    Turn on the light switch
    Push the lawn mower
    Climb a ladder
    Push the skate board.
    Show stacking

    And a reminder don't forget the release command.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    Been using conditioned reinforcers for years now. I like the word yes but whatever works for the individual.

    In my puppy classes I do target stick work so that people can get their timing right. I also get out a stack of pretend $50 notes and ask people to touch from the toes, knees, hips, nose, head, hands in air & keep repeating it. I pick one thing, keep it to myself, say knees and bridge each time they touch their knees after a few goes people get the gist of it and leave their hands on their knees.

    ...

    And a reminder don't forget the release command.
    Could you explain to me 'target stick work' and how it can help timing? Man, I wish I had gone to your puppy school! Are you in Brisbane by any chance?

    Thanks for the reminder - I do use OK to release him from a sit-stay or down-stay when it comes to feeding time/play time/greet strangers/greet dogs/etc - but what about instant actions like UP (onto something) or DOWN?

  4. #4
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    You can use a stick - dowel, your hand, or like me for the puppy classes I hand out wooden spoons because a class of people with pointed sticks is not a good idea.

    Rub something on the end of the wooden spoon, when the dog reaches out to smell and touches the spoon click and treat. Once you've done that a few times aim to tidy it up by only clicking when the dog gets the end of the spoon. If your timing is right and I'd say yours is because you're having success in other areas of training using the clicker you can hold the spoon out to the side, up in the air, weave between legs etc etc.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    You can use a stick - dowel, your hand, or like me for the puppy classes I hand out wooden spoons because a class of people with pointed sticks is not a good idea.

    Rub something on the end of the wooden spoon, when the dog reaches out to smell and touches the spoon click and treat. Once you've done that a few times aim to tidy it up by only clicking when the dog gets the end of the spoon. If your timing is right and I'd say yours is because you're having success in other areas of training using the clicker you can hold the spoon out to the side, up in the air, weave between legs etc etc.
    Ahhhh fantastic! It's similar to the 'touch' cue? So I can use the stick to guide him i.e. teach him how to walk in between my legs?

    What about timing though? Would I click the moment he walks through my legs or do I click when he touches the spoon? Mind you, he's nowhere near ready to start this but it's interesting to see how one would train that behaviour...

    And thanks again for the info and sorry if I seem like I'm using you as my personal trainer

  6. #6
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    When he touches the stick, I start to introduce the command touch.

    For weaving I reward when he touches the target stick, once he starts to enjoy this I start introducing another command, weave and bridge and reward as he goes thru the leg.

    I teach it with very young puppies for the sake of people getting their timing right. So many people bring forth the treat at the same time they are marking "yes" or "click" and then wonder why the dog doesn't get it. Because body language for a dog over-rides voice commands.

    When I take more advanced classes I will often make people do voice only or hand only commands so that they can see which one their dog takes the most notice of.

  7. #7

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    I like te clicker training too. YOU and your dog will learn to work hand in hand...

  8. #8

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    Nice going. There is really no limit (except you own skill) to what you can teach the dog. Mine are titled in tracking, obedience, carting, rally-O, and schutzhund. I also, from time to time foster aggressive dogs and use clicker along with CC and DS to get them back in shape and ready for adoption.

  9. #9
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    Must admit I struggled with the tracking with the Kelpie's and couldn't get a pass. Should of stuck with it and pushed thru the problems but got lazy.

    I have a Gordon now and she struggled with the basic stuff to the point where I was ready to throw the towel in on basic CD work, but anything to do with her nose, seek back work and stuff like that she excels at.

    What dog were you doing your tracking with.

  10. #10

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    My first experience with OC tracking was with a Brittany and shortly after a Pointer. At the time I was using a rather crude but still effective 'Scent in a Bottle" and later modified it as my understanding of OC and learning theory improved. My current tracking dogs are 2 Sheps.

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