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Thread: Separation Anxiety in Puppies

  1. #1
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    Default Separation Anxiety in Puppies

    Hmmm, I'm tired, as can be expected. Lol.

    GSD's just asked me how did Inca sleep last night...what about how did I sleep???

    Inca's anxiety last night was quite extreme. Well, TBH probably not any worse than the usual puppy, it's just that the sound of her voice is VERY VERY loud!!!

    Thankfully, there are no immediate neighbours close enough that the noise and carry-on would affect them and my sons would sleep through a ruddy hurricane. (Lucky buggers. )

    Inca finally realised that I wasn't going to come out and acknowledge her whining, barking, scratching, throwing herself at the door, and yes, she finally realised I also wasn't going to acknowledge her howling like a wolf at a full moon.

    So today I think we shall start on some short separation anxiety exercises.

    Any thoughts, comments or experiences ppl here would like to discuss or add?

    Now, where's that coffee cup again...

  2. #2
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    Sadly the only advice I have is the TOT. It worked for me, I had no idea what to do about Batty's separation anxiety and decided to follow the TOT and see how I went.

    It's brilliant!

  3. #3
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    Oh! Forgot to add! Some nights when Batty is particularly hyperactive and to get him to settle faster I give him a frozen bone He usually drops off to sleep with it still in his mouth!

  4. #4
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    I've heard people use a crate in their room, then the pup can hear you breathing and stuff and know they are not alone, don't know if this would work for because of her size though. Then of course their is the ticking clock, the radio left on low, and the teddy to cuddle up to. If you have tried all this, then sorry I don't think I am of any help! LOL!

  5. #5
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    hmm... When we got bella she had been separated from her littermates and mum for a week already so she was pretty good. Charlie had bella straight away so he was ok too.. Mind you, ours sleep in our bedroom so i think that helped. During the day i would leave the house (ok, i'd go stand near the elevator in the hallway or check the mail lol) for short periods 5mins, then 10 mins the next day etc and gradually built it up to a few hours. And dont worry about not getting much sleep DA - after another week or so you'll get used to it! After 2-3 months of getting up through the night to take pups for wees i can now easily survive on only a few hours sleep! Hehe

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    Oh! Forgot to add! Some nights when Batty is particularly hyperactive and to get him to settle faster I give him a frozen bone He usually drops off to sleep with it still in his mouth!
    Ours take nylabones to bed for the exact same reason!

  7. #7
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    Thank Cate, Yep, I've done all that.

    No, not interested in crating in bedroom.

    Usually I find separation anxiety exercises help greatly, not only with the night whining and stress but with leaving her at home alone at times, leaving her out the back if I go down to the front drive...things like that.

    Hi Angela. I personally won't leave a dog with a bone overnight. Just personal preference for safety reasons. But thank you anyway.

    After today's exercises, hopefully both she and I will have a better night.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie & Bella's mum View Post
    hmm... When we got bella she had been separated from her littermates and mum for a week already so she was pretty good. Charlie had bella straight away so he was ok too.. Mind you, ours sleep in our bedroom so i think that helped. During the day i would leave the house (ok, i'd go stand near the elevator in the hallway or check the mail lol) for short periods 5mins, then 10 mins the next day etc and gradually built it up to a few hours. And dont worry about not getting much sleep DA - after another week or so you'll get used to it! After 2-3 months of getting up through the night to take pups for wees i can now easily survive on only a few hours sleep! Hehe
    OMG!!! I couldn't do that. I wouldn't do that. Need my sleep too much. Probably because my sleep is so badly wrecked anyway by hubby until he moves into spare bedroom.

    Got GSD's treats opened and all ready to go with the exercises once the boys wake up.

  9. #9
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    I think the separation training needs to start before bedtime. It needs to be carried out throughout the day.

    At the moment she is the centre of attention from the family and it is a shock at the end of the day when suddenly she has to be by herself, no litter-mates, no people, but you know all that.

    Start giving her more time outside by herself during the day. If she has a sleeping area for night start training her to use it during the day.

    There are two methods I recommend to my puppy owners:
    1. Crate in bedroom for first week after that move crate to dogs designated sleeping area, you might do this slowly - outside bedroom, loungeroom slowly moving to the spot you prefer the dog to sleep. During the day the crate is kept in the final sleeping area.
    2. You must totally ignore the dog. Remember that if you waited till the dog reached almost fever pitch before going to it, the next night the dog will know he has to go to that level & past it to achieve the results they want.

    Make bed nice and den like, soft toys she can drape herself over (replacement litter mates)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    I think the separation training needs to start before bedtime. It needs to be carried out throughout the day.

    At the moment she is the centre of attention from the family and it is a shock at the end of the day when suddenly she has to be by herself, no litter-mates, no people, but you know all that.

    Start giving her more time outside by herself during the day. If she has a sleeping area for night start training her to use it during the day.

    There are two methods I recommend to my puppy owners:
    1. Crate in bedroom for first week after that move crate to dogs designated sleeping area, you might do this slowly - outside bedroom, loungeroom slowly moving to the spot you prefer the dog to sleep. During the day the crate is kept in the final sleeping area.
    2. You must totally ignore the dog. Remember that if you waited till the dog reached almost fever pitch before going to it, the next night the dog will know he has to go to that level & past it to achieve the results they want.

    Make bed nice and den like, soft toys she can drape herself over (replacement litter mates)
    Thanks MAC. Yep, that's what I intended to do, all day on and off for short periods. But only once the boys wake up.

    You have no idea how grateful I was that she could go all night if she wanted to and it wouldn't bother anyone around us! That was a huge relief.

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