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Thread: Walking on a lead

  1. #1
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    Default Walking on a lead

    Walking on a lead



    • Apart from health benefits for dogs and owners, dogs that have a daily walk are generally happy, well behaved canine companions.
    • A daily walk should be enjoyable for you and stimulating for your dog.
    • He shouldn’t drag you down the street but instead should walk calmly by your side on a loose lead. This command will help you achieve exactly that.
    • Training sessions should start in the backyard and be kept short.
    • In the backyard, place a lead on your dog and praise him. Do this several times until he gets used to the feel of the lead attached to his collar.
    • Once he is comfortable with the lead, attach the lead, praise your dog and had outside.
    • Start walking and when your dog starts pulling on the stop, say nothing, wait until the lead becomes loose. When he looks at you, praise the dog, reward with a treat and then start walking again.
    • Repeat this process each time he pulls. Make sure you praise your dog enthusiastically whenever he walks well. He’ll soon learn that he won’t be going anywhere while pulling on his lead.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan View Post
    Walking on a lead



    • Start walking and when your dog starts pulling on the stop, say nothing, wait until the lead becomes loose. When he looks at you, praise the dog, reward with a treat and then start walking again.
    If you have a 50+kg strong and exciteable Rottweiler, or any large dog with a high prey drive...............GOOD LUCK with the above.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerciH View Post
    If you have a 50+kg strong and exciteable Rottweiler, or any large dog with a high prey drive...............GOOD LUCK with the above.
    Haha thats true

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerciH View Post
    If you have a 50+kg strong and exciteable Rottweiler, or any large dog with a high prey drive...............GOOD LUCK with the above.
    Then you should make sure he learns how to walk properly on the leash by the time he reaches 50+ kilos. You have about a year or so...

  5. #5
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    The easiest way to control a larger dog is to train them correctly when they are young so that you dont have any issues when their older and much larger.

  6. #6
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    Exactly, im lucky i knew the guy who i bought my dog so well, that he is a vet and he trained my puppy for me and taught her how to walk on the lead.

  7. #7

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    Im having trouble with my cattle dog. Ive tried all that you said above when he was a puppy (I got him at 4 months old) but nothing has worked. Hes now just over a year and I really want to take him for walks.
    He pulls so hard on the lead that my hand swells and it hurts. Ive tried a choke chain and a head lead as well as the usual type lead. Same result.
    Although he is wonderful with dogs in our yard and happily plays with them and has never fought with any of them, hes a brat out an about. If we try to walk near a yard with barking dogs he tries to go at them.
    Basicaly Ive stopeed trying to walk him, and with a cattle dog, we all know thats NOT a good thing. Please help.

  8. #8
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    Nov 2008
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    I have a 60+kg dog and he walks fine. He is walked in a check chain, rarely do i need to check though, voice commands do the trick. When we first go out though he gets somewhat excited *L*, but soon gets back into heel mode.

    I now have a young GSD, she is in heel training, i use a cloth check collar on her, though she will go to a check chain in about 1 month.

    I start off, as soon as the dog is not in position, i say heel & a quick check, i also change directions often, keeps them guessing and they learn to focus on you. I praise calmly during the training, never enthusiastically, all that does is stir the dog up. Enthusiastic praise is only given at the end of the completed exercise. (walking is an exercise) The exercise isnt over until the 'Free' command is given.

    Verbal commands are handy, i can call my big guy from afar with 'Come, Heel' and he will return and sit in the heel position

    The pup is learning well, she has a very high drive, i would be waiting forever for the lead to become loose if i waited for her to stop pilling and did nothing or said nothing *L*

    But every dog is different, what works for some doesnt work for others

  9. #9

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    Ill try it. I guess I mainly persevere going in the same direction, but I reakon youre idea of constantly changing it could actually do the trick. I do praise too enthusiasticly though, I think Im just relieved that my poor hand gets a rest! LOL
    Hes such a smart boy so I think he will pick it up, I just needed a few new ideas to try and the courage to try again.
    Id love to one day be one of those people that can take their dog fishing with them, or out to the river. You know the people with those well behaved dogs where the whole family gets to go on outings?

  10. #10
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    Dec 2008
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    I'm still working at getting my 1 year old goldie to walk nicely without pulling - I've never had a pup take so long to train. She is very excitable and enthusiastic, very bouncy. I've found that changing directions, weaving round trees and posts, doing slow walking, abrupt stops, sit/stays etc incorporated into the walk keep her listening to me, but once we're back walking she still pulls! I've tried all sorts of leads and head collars too - she nearly strangles herself with a check chain. I'm sure she'll get the idea eventually, but meanwhile it just needs patience and perseverence, praise when it's due, and lots of treats.

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