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Thread: An Alpha Dog????

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Yay!!!

    Now let's give you some useful stuff to read

    Calming Signals Community

    Flying Dog Press - Suzanne Clothier - Registration Required!
    (you must log in to read articles, but trust me, it's worth investing those 5 minutes )

    Sirius Dog Training

    A-Z Parenting Resources | Wonder Puppy
    (this one's good, browse through for some useful literature)

    Using 'Dominance' To Explain Dog Behavior Is Old Hat

    Good luck!
    Awsome. Gonna get started on my new reading list today :P
    Thanks

  2. #82
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    You can get some really good books from about 10 bucks (more or less) on e-bay or Amazon.

    Turid Rugaas: "Calming signals", "My Dog Pulls. What Do I Do?"

    Barry Eaton: "Dominane-fact or fiction"

    Ian Dunbar's "Before you get puppy" and "After you get puppy" are free to download from the net (pdf - some 100 pages, it's not too heavy to download)

    Patricia McConell: "The other end of the Leash"

    "One on one" Nicole Wilde

    "The Power of Positive Dog Training" by Pat Miller

    for those really eager to go deep into dog's psyche, development and behaviour there's Applied Dog Behaviour and Training" by Steven Lindsey. I downloaded all 3 volumes, but now I'm not sure was it legal Anyway, these books are for those who study dog behaviour, so for starters just stick with the ones I listed above.

    When you read some of those books and articles, you'll see that it works better than Cesar Moron's techniques

  3. #83
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    Thank you Will start the ones by Ian Dunbar first since I can get them from the net... easier access xD

  4. #84
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    Type Ian Dunbar in YouTube, he's got some good clips there

  5. #85
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    Oh crap. In Ian Dunbar's 'after you get your puppy' it says the pup must meet at least 100 people before 12 weeks. Mine didn't meet ANY... I got her at 13 and the breeder didnt socialise her at all.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Masha View Post
    Oh crap. In Ian Dunbar's 'after you get your puppy' it says the pup must meet at least 100 people before 12 weeks. Mine didn't meet ANY... I got her at 13 and the breeder didnt socialise her at all.
    Masha don't take all of the advices too strictly and literally.
    But yes, the more people and animals and other dogs pup meets since early age - the better. The more sounds, noises sice eraly days - te better later. A lot of behaviour problems come from early puppyhood, as early as the time when pups were blind and deaf. His books are great for any owner and breeder. For example breeders that breed dogs for search and rescue, police etc... expose pups to gun shot noises, simulation of thunder and all sorts of "weird" sounds dogs very often get scared, so later on they have less or no problems with it.
    Last edited by Fedra; 01-15-2010 at 12:39 AM.

  7. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Why do you people want submissive dogs so much??? I don't get it!
    I ask that all the time. Why would you want a submissive dog. I think this is a short cut for people who don't want to take the time to train their dogs. Submissiveness, makes them easy to manage and with little self-volition because they've been made to frightened to do anything. In my view people who want a submissive dog want something just above a stuffed dog puppet.

    What I like in a dog is basically the same thing I like in a person: Confidence, self-initiative, intelligence, manners, socially adaptable and a job.

  8. #88
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    Don't worry what you should have done, don't worry what the breeder didn't do, you just worry about having fun. Read the literature and take things in baby steps, you can't achieve everything overnight.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Masha don't take all of the advices too strictly and literally.
    But yes, the more people and animals and other dogs pup meets since early age - the better. The more sounds, noises sice eraly days - te better later. A lot of behaviour problems come from early puppyhood, as early as the time when pups were blind and deaf. His books are great for any owner and breeder. For example breeders that breed dogs for search and rescue, police etc... expose pups to gun shot noises, simulation of thunder and all sorts of "weird" sounds dogs very often get scared, so later on they have less or no problems with it.
    When we first went to visit the reg breeders we got Troopa from they had a cd player in with the puppies playing all sorts of different sounds. I didn't know what it was all about until I was reading one of my dog books at a later date.
    I'm glad that they exposed him to it as I've never seen him get spooked by any noise as of yet

  10. #90
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    Masha

    I agree with what mouseandchicken said...forget about yesterday...live for today

    Look...having a submissive (read over-submissive dog) is not much fun. We rescued our Rex at 3 years old and this poor bugga had had a terrible first 3 years of his life. We got him home and he would pee on the floor if we just raised our voices the tiniest bit...he would stress urinate on the floor when we came home...he would be "bowing" his head not looking in our eyes...he was a downright mess.

    It took 1 week to change his stress urination behaviour. We simply completely ignored him when we got home...we didn't talk to him...we didn't look at him etc until after about 15-20 min when we could see he was not stressing anymore. I would simply just walk past him casually...pat him on the head and say..."how are you mate?" We let him eat next to us...invited him up on the lounge to relax and be with us and slowly we began to see this beautiful dog emerge. After a couple of weeks...I remember coming home and there was Rex standing at the door...waiting for us. This time though his tail was wagging slightly and he was looking at us instead of cowering and peeing and I knew we had turned a corner. I then went to my bedroom and here was this warm spot on my bed (and also Rex hair) and I knew he was starting to relax around us and beginning to trust us. It was the most amazing feeling to see this lovely boy change before our eyes out of the love, compassion and understand we were showing him.

    The point to this story is...it doesn't matter what you did yesterday...it matters what you do today

    Take a step back...let Dora be a puppy with all the funny antics. Remember what I said about the "boot camp"? Forget about Boot camp now. The only things I would be working on is...teach her to look in your eyes when you ask her to to get her attanetion...you need this attention later when you train her. Teach her to sit before you feed her...it means please in doggy language. Do the "food circuit" for short periods of time...it is fun for you and Dora and will teach her in a fun way to come to you when you say...Dora, come

    Like I said...Cesar can be dangerous for people who do not know how to interpret what he is doing in a proper way...and really, the only person who can do that is Cesar.

    In my opinion...it is not about having a submissive dog...it is about having a dog that has bonded to you because it trusts you...not fearing you...if you understand. It is MUCH easier to work with a dog that is "driven" than one that is submissive and shuts down.

    Keep your training sessions short, because Dora's attention span isn't all that long right now.

    Get her out in public. Bring a zip bag full of her most loved treats...go to a shopping centre where you can sit on a bench...ask people to gve her a treat (if you trust she will not bite them). If you think it is too premature to do this right now...just take her there and sit amongst a lot of people. If she starts shaking...ignore it and let her release the stress.

    Have fun...fun...fuuuuuuun

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